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I recently installed new brake pads. They haven't been bedded in yet and I don't intend to use them for daily driving.

The pressure feedback from my brake pedal progressively increases as I apply more force to it, but I'm able to push it until it feels like it is stopped by a physical barrier (with engine running and while stopped). The pedal maintains constant travel distance with constant pressure from my foot. The bite seems good. I only needed to press it down a couple inches (well before hitting the physical barrier) to get maximum braking during a few 50-10 mph tests. I've also flushed the brake fluid and it is the same.

Is this amount of pedal travel normal?

  • When you apply the brakes, does the pedal hit it's limit? An absolutely hard stop at the end of it's travel? – DucatiKiller Jun 16 '15 at 5:24
  • Was the travel comparable prior to changing out the brake pads? – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Jun 16 '15 at 11:27
  • @DucatiKiller Yes that's what it feels like (that I can't push the pedal any further). – user219694 Jun 16 '15 at 18:27
  • @Paulster2 I didn't pay any attention to it before I changed the pads, just assumed the car came out in good working condition from the factory. – user219694 Jun 16 '15 at 18:28
  • Did you bleed the brakes? – MrDoom Oct 24 '15 at 0:47
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First of all, if you worried about brakes have a proffesional check them out.

That said, I've had the same problem after replacing pads before. Jumped in the car and pressed the pedal down hard, thinking I was simulating a hard braking situation. I was convinced that the pedal didn't normally do that, but the reality is that in a normal driving situation, you are not pushing on the pedal that hard.

Most of the time, you apply pressure to the brakes until it is obvious you are slowing down, and this point is (hopefully) well before the floor or end of petal travel. This does not take a lot of force, or certainly less force then most people actively realise. You said yourself:

I only needed to press it down a couple inches (well before hitting the physical barrier) to get maximum braking during a few 50-10 mph tests.

Since this isn't a daily driver, start your daily up, and push the pedal all the way in. I haven't driven a car yet where you can't "bottom out" the pedal-- when stopped with engine running/brake booster engaging.

I wasn't convinced this was normal until I test drove a brand new (12 miles) car, and was able to push the pedal all the way down. It takes far less pressure from your foot to stop the car than to bottom out the pedal.

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