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I just got 4 new tires on my 2008 Honda Fit Sport. Here is the report from the alignment:

enter image description here

The mechanic said that nothing can be done about the rear-left wheel because the alignment is not adjustable. Is that true? If so, how can I use this car without going through tires yearly??

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    IIRC, the rear toe shouldn't cause you any wear problems, it will just crab the vehicle a little. Your total toe for the rear shows to be in tolerance, so I don't know. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Nov 19 '14 at 2:42
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    Just a note: you can use the stackexchange interface to include your images in line with your question. That's saves a step for people answering them as they don't wander off to another website. – Bob Cross Nov 19 '14 at 16:23
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To answer your question, there aren't any alignment adjustments possible at the rear of the Honda Fit. Here is the reason why:

enter image description here

This picture shows the front and rear suspension on your vehicle. It shows it to be made as a torsion suspension. At the front of the torsion bar are two pivot points which locates the suspension, then there is a spring and and shock with supports the load of the vehicle and dampens any road obstacles. There is nothing there to adjust to correct your issue. The whole setup moves up or down at the tire side while pivoting off the front where it is attached to the vehicle itself. If the road surface is uneven, the torsion bar will flex to provide stability, as well as while cornering.

While this is a very simple, basic setup, it works quite well. The downside is, there aren't any adjustments to be had. There are two things to think about here:

  • Since this is at the rear of the vehicle and the tires are just being pulled along (these trail the vehicle), you should have a minimal expectation of wear. The front tires will always wear faster because of ever changing geometries while turning.

  • The only way I can see there being a problem here is if there was actual damage done to the torsion suspension portion or to the wheel bearings themselves. I would bet if there were an issue with either part of this, the alignment guy would have said something when you got it done. At this time, I'm highly doubting there are any issues of this type.

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    by "there aren't any alignment adjustments possible with the Honda Fit" did you mean "aren't any adjustments possible on the rear wheels"? – GavinR Nov 20 '14 at 16:40
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    @GavinR ... yes, that's absolutely what I meant. I updated it to reflect. And when I say that, you could possibly make adjustments, but it would take extraordinary means, such as cutting and welding the torsion bar. Yah, I don't thing so! – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Nov 20 '14 at 17:08
  • @Paulster2 can I assume all rear torsion bar setup won't have adjustments? I'm tempted to update the shocks for my 04 Toyota Echo, and the service manual says there are no rear adjustments other than replacing the suspension parts. So if I change the shocks (and / or springs), taking it in for an alignment is mostly to check that it's not gone completely out of whack, right? – Calyth May 27 '15 at 15:39
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Rear end CAN be aligned. About $25 for 2 round "shims" to be installed between the rear wheel hubs and their mounts on the suspension. (SPC Performance 75600 Dual Angle Camber/Toe Shim, Yellow & Alignment Camber/Toe Shim Rear Specialty Products 75800 (one for each side).) Then take it to a shop that knows what they are doing. Must 1st measure alignment, then remove rear wheels, drums, and rear hubs. Mechanic will then install the shims in a particular orientation, put the hubs back on, then the drums, then the wheels, then recheck the alignment. Front end will need to be realigned once all back together.

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