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4

Plastic or nylon housings like this usually contain one-half (either male or female) of a push-on spade connector. Here's a female one, with no wire: The male connector part slides into the female part between the female's rolled-together edges. On the back face of this metal connector, you'll see a small tab of metal, pushed down at the left so its end is ...


4

The fuse box is designed for all vehicles and positions only used as needed for each vehicle. First check if those empty fuse slots have terminals in them, without terminals adding fuses does nothing. Then check the legend to see if that item or function is fitted or valid for the vehicle. Example : A fuse position can be provided for diesel heater plugs ...


4

Its probably not the fuseable link; more likely is that the starter motor needs to be shimmed. The starter motor has a small gear ( the pinion gear) which sticks out on a shaft to engage the flywheel. if the pinion gear doesn’t stick out far enough, it will spin but not turn the flywheel. The starter will test fine on the bench. Sometimes the pinion ...


3

The low beam circuit uses dedicated fuses. There are no fusible links in the headlamp circuits. In your case fuse 11 is the passenger side low beam.


3

D-GN Low Speed GMLAN Serial Data 2–3. Not Used BK Ground BK/WH Ground TN/BK High Speed GMLAN Serial Data (+) (1) 7–13. Not Used TN High Speed GMLAN Serial Data (-) (1) Not Used RD/WH Battery Positive Voltage


2

There are two connections because the current to drive the starter is high so it has a direct supply from the battery and the other connection is the control. The connection through the ignition switch, park switch then solenoid is for two reasons: To operate the starter when it is safe to do so ie not in gear The starter needs a high current (in excess of ...


2

The smell you describe could be a sign of damage, or it could just be your power supply under a heavy load. The damage could be in the charging system, or the car. Your nose is a valuable tool for tracing that smell, as well as a visual inspection: Male charger plug: If you're using a bench power supply you likely hooked up a car charger male plug to it, ...


2

If all you can get is 16mm² cable, then put two of them in parallel. 2x16mm² would have a lot higher current carrying capacity than 1x28mm² cable. The other thing I would check would be that the new cables had similar thickness strands of copper, so that they have similar flexibility


1

A quick way would be to install an inline fuseholder and connect it to the hot side of an existing "Hot on run" fuse.


1

Easiest way to do what your asking is use a digital multi-meter in continuity mode but first you want see which side of the fuse is connected to the supply so set your meter to DC and remove the fuse, turn your ignition on and check voltage at the fuse terminals. Which ever side of the terminals read 12V is your supply, next for simplicity, remove the SJB (...


1

Braided hoses expand less than all-rubber ones, because metal which surrounds the braided hose expands less than rubber. When applied to brake hoses, this makes a difference in high performance driving where high brake pedal pressures are involved - due to reduced expansion of the lines, brake pedal feels more linear and consistent. This is especially ...


1

That's usually a break in the wiring harness to the MAF sensor. Pretty common actually. Disconnect electrical connector to MAF. Key in RUN position. Check for battery voltage on Pink wire. If you see that, flex the wiring harness to see if it stays. Check for good ground on black wire. Flex harness. If you find intermittent, fix the broken wire.


1

Looks like you car has a throttle pedal sensor. My guess would be that you have a bad earth connection somewhere, so that the sensor is having to find its earth through the lighting circuit. I would check the resistance of the ground connection at the throttle pedal as a start.


1

If it is the thin “wires” on the glass then I have had success in the past with silver conductive paint. You have to find the breaks and clean them back to metal - I used a razor or scapel but be careful they are very very thin. Then mask each side and coat over the break. Follow the instructions for the paint.. remove the masking and test only when dry. ...


1

If I had been handed this "basket case". I'd simply get a (car/truck) manual that has the wiring diagram in it, and patch it back together. I'd also wager that a search for "year model wiring diagram" will turn up some possibly better diagrams that you'll find in the manual. HTH


1

If the opening in the dash is sufficiently large, then it will be a straight swap, assuming that the wiring is "standard". Most ICE have adaptor harnesses available to match the ICE to a vehicle. If the opening is not large enough then different parts will be needed, sourcing the may be easy or challenging.


1

I found two part numbers for you: Standard Motor Products - PN: S685 WVE/Aiirtex/Wells - PN: 1P1005 The end of the Standard Motor Products looks like this:


1

Maybe an automatic control has a faulty sensor ? My 2011 Murano has auto wipers that turn on and off and adjust speed according to any rain : Such a system would cause your condition with a bad sensor. I expect it would need to be evaluated by the dealer.


1

A diode will work but will drop some voltage. A Schottky diode drops less than a silicon diode but may still be noticeable (or not). As Solar Mike says, a relay will work, and is liable to be cheaper than using a diode as automotive relays are a very well developed technology with an immense market. Any automotive SPST (single pole single throw) relay with ...


1

I would use a two relay setup for this. The relays shall be parallel and one pin or the coil goes to the low beam switch and the one of the other relay to the high beam switch. This way no diode is needed. But are you really sure you want to enable low beam with high beam? Driving at night has the low beam always on. In the day the high beam is only for ...


1

In some manner, the 12v always-on power isn't always on. Connect your voltmeter or test light to the always-on circuit, and leave it connected for the same length of time it takes for the head unit to lose memory. You'll probably find that he 12v always-on power goes away. Then you can search for the fault in the always-on power circuit, and rectify it.


1

Along with Paul's diagram below, the second diagram should get the job done.


1

i'm really surprised! you have really a good knowledge in diagnostic techniques, any way upon to my experience that car has faulty ecm motherboard , you have to make sure in case if you disconnect the ecm you will loss " ROM" the keep alive memory or not because the same thing with camaro , if not you can disconnect ecm and see voltage will drop to zero at ...


1

If you can't find silicone insulated wire, try nylon coated pvc insulation. it's very common at any electrical supply place. It's rated for higher temperatures and the nylon coating helps protect the pvc from degrading. A little more expensive than regular wire, but less expensive than silicone insulated wire.


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