Hot answers tagged

55

What you are failing to realize is the non-drive axle provides stability. Yes, the two tires with power going to the ground needs traction to motivate the vehicle down the road, however, you still need to be able to control the vehicle. Regardless of whether your drive axle is up front or in the rear, the opposite axle provides the means to keep the vehicle ...


34

There is something (very) wet inside your car. Feel around the floor, look at all the lowest points of the floor. If the front passenger floor is wet check the hoses to the heater core. Check all window gaskets. Check the spare tire well and the trunk gaskets. Check to make sure that all windows roll up completely. A fold or tear in a gasket or debris can ...


27

Is it magnetic? if so, a big magnet (from a speaker for example) might help...


23

Your vehicle will be perfectly fine. You don't necessarily need to do anything before leaving.


21

Do you use the circulate feature on your car? This should be turned off. It looks like the image below: I learned early on that this causes this exact issue in the winter. My theory is that the moist warm air we breath out is circulated over and over and then sticks to the cold windows. When you shut that option off, you are pulling in fresh (dry) air from ...


20

As Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 said, saving the rims turns out to be a better solution. Usually, we keep two sets of rims: one with our winter tires, one with our summer tires. A very rough average lifespan (with my driving) for tires is around 3-4 years, so we can just swap our rims 3-4 years in a row before having to replace the tires. Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 mentioned that it keeps ...


19

Clean out the interior first; make sure there's no food or anything that could spoil or attract a hungry animal. You don't need to disconnect the battery unless you already need a new battery.


18

I would agreee with the articles - waiting a minute or so (generally the time it takes to clear the ice off the windows...) is generally fine. As the other answers say, the engine will idle high to start with, as the ECU compensates for the colder block and thicker oil by running the engine richer. This will cause more wear to the engine, as the oil is ...


16

The pros and cons of running dedicated summer and winter sets of wheels/tires will depend on individual situations. For what it's worth, I advocate having dedicated summer and winter tires available if the different seasons of your area makes sense to do so. The alternative would be to run all-season tires year round, which I don't recommend, but opinions on ...


16

If the area you lost it in isn't too large, you could shovel the snow into a big bucket, bring it inside, and let it melt. This could be tricky if the area you might have lost it is large, or if the snow is deep. Any other way of melting the snow in place would also work if you have a portable source of heat. If you're in no rush, just wait until spring!


16

I would disconnect the battery, apart from that all else will be fine. Most cars have circuits, like the clock, that consume power at all times. Disconnecting the battery stops this drain, but it won’t stop the natural discharge of the battery.


14

If the site of the tragedy is such that you can easily acquire water, use a hose (or a bucket) and simply run/pour water over the area to melt the snow. Since snow is an insulator, running a propane torch will be an exercise in patience (and an exercise in buying a bunch of propane). Water is cheap, melts snow faster, and is less likely to burn your house ...


14

Unfortunately, not really. The concern with 10 year old tires is degradation of the rubber leading to increased risk of failure. This degradation happens regardless of how much you use them. Tires are generally manufactured to last about 5 to 7 years, usually the tread wears out before the rubber goes. As you noticed the rubber has already changed, once you ...


14

Neither option is ideal. The way the current winter tires are described, it seems that they would be equally bad on ice as a set of summer tires. If you don't plan on using the car in snow, it makes sense to at least have grip for non-icy conditions. Fresh summer tires would be much safer in this scenario. Please bear in mind though that weather is ...


13

One other thing to keep in mind when letting a car warm up. You're only warming up the engine. Remember all the other components that stay cold until driven: rear end, shocks, suspension components, tires, etc. So even if you let a car warm up until the engine is closer to operating temperature, you should still drive easy at first, until all components ...


13

It sounds like you're spot on for your car. Words of advice: If you only want to change the oil once a year, use something like Mobil 1 Annual Protection, which is a full synthetic oil. It's good for one year or 20k miles. Remember, oil is dependent upon time as well as mileage. Driving it once every 1-3 weeks for 20-30 minutes is spot on for less used cars....


12

Bob cross makes some good points, however, I would offer the following opinions: Winter tires don't have the dry grip that summer tires do. Your "high performance" handling will be limited with your winter tires on. Therefore, I wouldn't be too concerned about the incremental difference in handling due to the difference in unsprung weight between steel and ...


12

I second Gabriel's comment: Probably cost. Nickel Moly Chromium Stainless (316) is very expensive, this random kitchen sink is just a sheet of stainless stamped into a cube, and it's $500+ retail. Given the price I have to assume it's 316, otherwise it would be even more. I can only imagine what a single wheel would cost a manufacturer. Even using Powdered ...


12

For one month I think that you are just fine without any extra precautions. But if it's for a longer period, then you may consider the following ideas. I recommend three action points, one on them is stolen from the comment of user Jeff Y. Maybe increase the air pressure in the tires by about 0.5 bar (and check the pressure of the spare tire at that ...


11

tl;dr: Cold dry air has a substantial effect on horsepower. This can be confirmed through experimentation on any modern car. I can think of two scientific reasons as to why this may be: Increased air density Decreased humidity Yes and yes. You're already most of the way there. Let's take a quick trip to simplified theoretical model land:...


11

I can see a few reasons to do this: The weather in some places will be so cold that even with the thermostat fully closed the cooling system isn't able to warm the engine up to operating temperatures. Inhibiting air flow through the radiator will reduce the amount of heat rejected to the surroundings, allowing the engine to get up to temperature. The cold ...


11

Install a metal detector app on your phone. Seriously. They work pretty well.


11

On my car the A/C is on all the time - as per the handbook, specifically to control the humidity inside the car. You should consider running with the A/C on over the winter and see if that makes a difference.


10

tl;dr: Ambient air temperature should generally not interfere with engine efficiency or fuel consumption, but will affect overall power output. Do not confuse efficiency with power output. These are two separate things. When your intake charge is more dense, you can throw more fuel at it and creates more power. (NOTE: The idea for the engine management ...


10

In very cold climates there are electric heaters that replace the dip stick. They are plugged into an AC outlet and because they reach the oil pan they can apply heat directly to the oil. That way the oil doesn't get cold to the point where it totally looses it's ability to keep your engine protected at start up. It's plugging in that electric heater that "...


9

No, you cannot. You state that " I would only have to scrape a little bit to get there safely", however this is not correct - you should clear ALL essential windows before you move the car - the first mile or so as you get out of your neighbourhood are probably the most dangerous, as you will be more likely to encounter pedestrians, cyclists, etc, who you ...


9

Driving through snow of any thickness is increasing the rolling resistance of the vehicle, meaning you will need to use more engine power just to maintain your speed. Since there's no such thing as a free lunch, more engine power requires more air and fuel, which you are observing as more throttle required. How much fuel will be consumed is affected by: ...


9

A full tank of gas will minimize condensation in the fuel tank.


8

Regular washing and waxing is your best bet. We kept our cars in one piece through the Rochester, NY winters with nothing more than this. The wax provides a sacrificial protective coating for the painted parts of the body. You can apply wax to your wheels as well. As a bonus, the brake dust will be easier to wash off of a waxed wheel. Then wash, wash, ...


8

Wash off the salt whenever possible. Inspect the car regularly (especially in locations where salt and water can get trapped). Repair any noticable damage immediately (damaged paint, damaged undercoating, etc). Set aside some spare funds in the anticipation of such repairs. My experience is that body panels don't rust, it's the strut towers, floor, and ...


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