11

The blockage probably isn't in the nozzle, it's right at the inlet of the pump. Some have a screen, many don't. You can wire the pump backwards temporarily, to run the pump in the other direction and hopefully push the blockage out of the pump's inlet. Or put compressed air into the outlet hose of the pump - the hose that leads to the nozzle. You can ...


10

I fixed a leak in my coolant tank (which is the exact same plastic) using a few strips of plastic* cut from a spray bottle I bought at a hardware store. You can either use a heat gun or a soldering iron to melt the plastic into place. Just be careful of burning the plastic. This video is a good guide. Even though it's a much larger tank, the technique is ...


9

I would put a hosepipe into the washer fluid filler and just flush it out with water. AdBlue is apparently non-toxic, so there should be no problem doing this - https://www.carbuyer.co.uk/tips-and-advice/152834/what-is-adblue


7

The wiper motor itself shouldn't be damaged by frozen washer fluid, what may be damaged is the washer pump motor however mine has frozen several times and as long as you don't keep trying to use it, it should be fine.


6

High Pressure Air I would disconnect the hose from that sprayer from the motor that gives it the pressure to spray. I would go where there is high pressure air. In my case that would be my shop. I would have an air gun with a rubber tip. I would take that air gun with a rubber tip and push it tightly against the sprayer nozzle and use the high pressure ...


6

If you are at least slightly handy with tools (or have a nice friend who is) then it probably wouldn't be too hard to remove the tank c/w pump from the car and take it inside to the warmth and let it defrost in the bath tub and maybe even run some warm water over it. This may fix the tank and pump, but line is harder. Possibly fill tank with winter fluid ...


6

Here's a parts explosion The hose #9 you could drain through. I like the coolant idea. pour coolant in the reservoir, it might take a bit but it will turn the slush into liquid. There a glycerin in it and it's alcohol based so it's miscible with any alcohol in your wiper fluid. Nothing bad will happen. Others chime in if this is ridiculous to you for ...


5

I can't tell from the photo but the washer system only contains a few parts. With the hose disconnected turn on the wash cycle. If fluid squirts from the hose the pump is working. If any of the hoses leak then repair or place them. The final part is the nozzle. This is the part that actually forms the spray pattern .Depending on the make and model you may ...


5

If you dont hear any buzzing sound from the pump then. Check for a blown fuse. If the fuse is intact then remove the pump and take it to a mechanic to fix or replace.Also if possible check the wiring. Overfilling does not cause any problem as long as the pump is working. Fuse Location for VW Passat Note:Number 24 is the fuse for windscreen washer motor.


4

Your theory sounds good to me. Do run the windshield washers before parking the car. Now, about fixing the current scratches: There are products that allow you to polish the windshield to remove scratches. In the same way that you would polish the paint. I do it to my car every month, except that I use the regular paint polish rather than the more expensive ...


4

I've personally had success clearing these nozzles using a sewing pin; the type that a seamstress may use to pin a garment together just before it is sewn. You can not only use the pin to clear the nozzle but you can also use it to adjust the area of the screen that it's point at once it's been cleared.


4

It's definitely possible. My choice for a repair like this would be JB Weld, but I would think lots of products would do fine, though I'd be skeptical of any kind of caulk that's not going to bond tightly to the plastic.


4

I just did this last weekend. It is an easy job! The consensus on must of the Vauxhall/Opel forums is not to try and poke anything into the hole, you'll just ram the blockage further inside the nozzle. Here are the steps... Unclip the "strings" which hold the parcelshelf in place Unscrew the plastic ball joints which those string were clipped to Unclip the ...


4

Drawing from years of experience with many glass treatments, if anything, RainX increases the wiper blade life when used properly. This could either be due reduced use of the wipers or the added lubrication between glass and blade. You say: I've had a set of Bosch flexible wiper blades on my car for a little over a year now, and they've always worked ...


4

Rain-X, like any chemical that sticks around, has a residual film which can attract dust and debris. When you used your wipers on this chemical it allowed everything that has been accumulating on your wiper blades to clump up and cause poor performance. The alcohol you cleaned them with dried the rubber up severely, so it may be too late for those blades ...


4

The only solution to defrosting the fluid in your washers is temperature. Typically it is easy to warm up the washer bottle and pipes, as they are under the bonnet and the engine provides warmth, but the main problem is the jets (which is why some manufacturers provide heated washer jets as an option) Removing as much ice or snow from around them helps, but ...


4

The check valves are there to prevent fluid from draining back to the tank so that the spray happens as soon as you ask for it. Weak output from both jets suggests a common point of failure. Some things to check: A kinked or pinched hose. Clogging of a filter in the fluid reservoir. A failing pump motor. Low voltage to the pump motor. Another possibility ...


3

I've managed to repair these jets (and re-align them) by using a dress pin pushed down the nozzle. Typically either dirt or polish (depending on how you maintain your car) accumulates at the exit point of the nozzle and a pin is enough to clear it.


3

Screenwash is water based, and it's adding alcohol that stops it freezing - which is something you do need to do, otherwise it'd freeze in the tank and potentially burst it, as well as being no use. However when the liquid gets to the jet end of the system, and is exposed to the air, the alcohol evaporates, and the remaining water freezes. Therefore there's ...


3

Do you have a Haynes manual or similar for the car? They usually describe how to remove the various bits of trim... Before trying to remove the trim, have you tried cleaning the nozzle out with the tip of a needle or a fine bit of wire? The bottom photo shows the trim to be in four parts - the window surround (two parts), the lower panel and the lock ...


3

The Nozzle is the bottle neck, therefore that is the most likely place for a clog. Pull the hose from the back of the nozzle and use a needle to clear the blockage and reattach the hose, making sure that no debris are remaining in the hose/nozzle.


3

As most pumps have the motor external to the fluid then cooling is not an issue as they are only designed for intermittant use. The pump is usually a vane type design so there is little or no friction between the vanes and the body so lubrication there is not an issue, ergo the running of the pump for brief periods is not a problem - most drivers stop ...


3

A quick search for "washer fluid MSDS" yields a material safety datasheet that lists the flammability limits for methanol as follows: Lower Explosive Limit (LEL): 6 % (by volume) Upper Explosive Limit (UEL): 36 % (by volume) Flash point: 90 °F Autoignition temperature: 878 °F So methanol will readily vaporize (flash off) if it comes in contact with ...


2

I tried unblocking them with pins, but they turned out to be really blocked. In the end, I simply bought some new mist washer jets on eBay. It was like £5, and I was going to upgrade anyway. I simply fitted them myself by hacking them slightly, by trimming down the plastic stumps. Do NOT cut off too much, or you will need to buy some more as they won't ...


2

Some owner's manuals will recommend using a needle or small pin to dislodge debris that causes clogging or misdirection of flow. It is normal for the spray nozzles to get clogged in dusty environments; you shouldn't have to replace them.


2

I have found the real key to getting the bugs off is, the shorter they are on the windshield, the easier they come off the windshield. If you are in a swarm, I understand this can use a lot of washer fluid and will keep the wipers in the on position a lot. Been there; done that. ( Try travelling in southern Virginia in the summer time at dusk and see the ...


2

Yes, there is special windshield washer fluid that is designed specifically to remove the remains of bugs from your windshield. I don't know what the active ingredient is in these formula's. I have used this fluid and did not seem to do any harm to the paint of my vehicle either. All the major auto parts stores have several brands of this type of washer ...


2

Whatever you do, don't try to unclog the nozzles with anything solid. This is a sure way to break them - you may end up washing the windshield of the car behind you. Even dislodging ice from around them could be tricky because it could change their alignment. If the clog is caused by ice, my suggestion is to find a heated parking place (like in a shopping ...


2

According to the Data sheet I viewed on line it should do no harm. How effective it will be, will depend on how much it is diluted by the water in the washer tank. The formula may also evaporate quickly in the tank. In short it is better than straight water, but likely not as effective as a product designed to be added directly to the windscreen washer tank.


2

LOL - I literally just dealt with exactly the same problem too. What I did is stick a roof heating wire inside the tank and plug it into a wall outlet for 12 hours. Another solution from a friend was to boil water and continuously pour it in the tank until the ice is melted, then normally drain all the water using the pump to spray it all out and then fill ...


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