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100

Plexiglass is flammable. While it doesn't release toxic gases or excessive amounts of smoke, it is still rated B2 (normally flammable) and thus forbidden as interior material in motor vehicles, including windows. Here is a relevant US standard if you're interested in details. Collision behaviour mentioned by Thomas is also a crucial property, especially ...


43

Because of how it reacts in a collision. Auto glass is designed to shatter into small bits that are fairly dull, as opposed to large, sharp daggers. In the US, your car must be outfitted with glazing material that meets certain specs, and material type is not specified. If anyone could get plexiglass to satisfy those specs, I am sure it would be lower cost ...


32

The most effective thing I've found for this is heat. Warm the sticker with a hair dryer. When it gets warmed to a certain point it will easily pull away without leaving residue. One word of caution though, when it comes off the glass completely it will try to stick itself to your hand. Hot plastic is not something you want on your hand, so wear gloves ...


24

On glass, heat would probably work well as mentioned, but I've worked at a car dealership for years, and always removed stickers and window paint with a simple straight razor blade and windex. The windex is really just for lubrication - spray a bunch around the sticker, and scrape it off using the razor blade at an angle. Any remaining residue can be ...


22

In addition to to the other factors mentioned. Plexiglass is not opaque to UV radition like silica glass. Passengers would get sunburned driving around exposed to sunlight. Used to be, when not all cars in hot climes had air conditioners, you could tell those drivers who did not because they'd roll down the driver's side window and sometimes put their ...


16

Plastics are awesome. One of their characteristics is that they easily degrade in UV / sunlight. In my experience that is the weakest link in its usage. With that said, there are a whole lot of plastics used on modern cars. Generally headlamp lenses are made of polycarbonate. The polycarbonate material has a thin coating sprayed on top of the lens to ...


12

Every window has what's called a window regulator (here's a representative image): The window itself attaches to the window track. This keeps it steady and level while moving up and down. As you can see, there are gears at the bottom which connect to a motor (or a crank if a manual), which prevent the whole assembly from going down all at once. This is why ...


12

Acetone and isopropyl rubbing alcohol (90% and higher) are very effective at dissolving glue without affecting glass. It will affect any other plastic layer on the window so you should check for any anti-UV screen or other. I suggest a combination of Steve Matthews' answer (remove the plastic with heat) and afterwards get the eventual glue residue off with ...


11

The black dots blend the border into the glass A: Windshield glass contains a black enamel band (called the frit) around the periphery that is baked into the glass. This black band includes a border of dots. See figure. The band has an etched surface to enable adhesive to bond to the glass, says a sales manager at Able Auto Glass. When car ...


9

There are limits on the amount of cracking allowed on a windscreen before it fails safety inspection. Obviously, if your car isn't in a state/county that requires safety inspection, that's irrelevant. What is relevant is the fact the windscreen is an integral part of the structural strength of the car. If it's cracked, it's weakened, and may cause more ...


9

In the simplest terms possible, the windshield acts as a spoiler or fairing, pushing the air out and up as your vehicle gains speed. The air naturally will push back to be along the side of the vehicle. With the front windows open, there is enough pressure to push the air out away from the windows to give the feeling of less drag. With the rear windows, ...


8

Total Guess It's very cold. You drive around. You roll down your window to smoke. Moisture from respiration builds up on the edge of the window while you smoke. You roll your window up. Moisture is trapped between your window and the rubber insulation. You park and go inside. The window freezes to the surface of the insulation.


7

I think in answering this question you need to answer the initial question which is fundamentally, is plexiglass used for glazing in road cars. The answer to this question is that it is a very definite yes, it is used. One example of a production vehicle that uses plastic windows is the Porsche 911 GT3 (991 GT3 R). Taken from wiki information about the ...


6

tl dr: There are no major safety issues with using wax on your windows. I have done it before without issue. It will do a couple of things for you. First, it will fill in minor imperfections in the glass. When I say minor, I mean the really minor stuff. This will help it look more optically clear. The second thing it will do is cause a whetting effect with ...


6

it scratches too easily. thus, it cannot be used in a road environment


6

Rear and side windows are generally made from tempered glass which has been heat treated to set up residual stresses in the plate which put the interior under compression. This is what causes it to break into small granules rather than long shards. However, although it has decent tensile strength it is still a brittle material and very notch sensitive. The ...


5

Safety glass will most always look the same no matter how or where it shatters, mainly due to the design of the glass. It's made to break into a thousand little pieces (you'll still find pieces five years from now if you still have the car ... they just get everywhere). I don't think you'll ever be able to conclusively figure out, with 100% surety whether ...


5

Well, there are some downsides. First, most cars turn it off automatically so the manufacturer doesn't think you should leave it on all the time. The way the defroster works, it's a grid of thin conductive silver ceramic lines that are painted onto the rear window, before being baked on at high heat. In operation it is a high current device that on average ...


4

This does not make sense because you can get tint in ever darker shades. If you want the ultimate in darkness, get some limo tint. Having multiple layers on the window is just asking the outer layer to show wear signs due to the extra thickness. If this happens you'll get tares and discoloration of your tint. There are two considerations: The extra cost of ...


4

First: how to fix. You can take a scraper to the inside of the car window. The windows are definitely hardy enough to withstand having a scraper used on it. I do it all the time, and have never had a problem. However, if you are concerned about it, there is an easy work-around: heat up your car for a few minutes and turn on the heat full blast pointed ...


4

Without replacing it, there are few options. You would need heat to smooth the material back down. Using a heat gun sparingly & carefully may work, but doing so improperly would likely make the situation worse. The other option is to trim the parts sticking up with a very sharp razor blade. Careful not to cut deep into the material, only along the ...


4

Sticker remover or sticker adhesive sprays and manual scraping work a treat. I'd use a plastic scraper or credit card to avoid damaging rear defroster lines.


4

Some older cars have more than one controllable "window" on the door, so there needs to be more than one window crank. For example, here's a photo showing a car door with 2 window cranks. You can tell that there's 2 different pieces of the window that can be controlled.


4

For the angle of the rear window, vertical is basically for the load volume / carrying capacity, getting things with a high roof line opening. Well, some sedans or sedans with a hatch-back did have rear wipers...


3

Apart from collision/fire behavior, automotive glazing has to resist damage from road debris - stones and such. It also has to resist abrasion from dusty/dirty windshield wipers. That requires a hard material which plexiglass is not. As well, you need an undistorted view of the road ahead, which requires that the windshield be of uniform thickness and free ...


3

As mentioned in my update to my question, I'm fairly certain it is a "glass to lift plate bushing", it's a 2-part bushing. Looks like a black plastic t-nut that screws into the middle of this white plastic piece. Then the screw from the window regulator screws into the black t-nut to hold everything together. I mentioned I was going to purchase one from ...


3

In many ways, a better solution would be to install an auto-dimming mirror: most auto manufacturers nowadays offer this feature as an option the dimming gel relies on light-sensor input to decide whether to lighten or darken installing window tint reduces night-driving visibility not all legislations approve of the installation of window tint. Auto-dimming ...


3

When you park at work, try to orient your car towards the south, which will help solar heating of the front of the car. With any luck your ice will sublimate, and when you run the heater in the car the fresh but dry air will further get moisture out of the inside compartment. Outside, polymer coatings such as Rain-X on glass, and wax on painted surfaces ...


3

Use a UV ray light. Keep phosphorus material inside see if it lights up. Light on the outside, glowing material inside, through the window you hope it does not light up.


3

For anything that's just glass, I would follow @James' answer regarding a razor blade and any glass cleaner; it's definitely the best tactic. For the inside of the rear window where you have the defroster lines running, I've had the best luck with the aerosol "professional strength" version of Goof Off (or likely any other xylene/heavy solvent based cleaner)...


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