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Fortunately that damage is mostly cosmetic. That style of wheel, where the spokes run out to end flush at the very rim of the wheel is a pretty stiff geometry, so you're unlikely to have deformed the ledge and face that the tire seats on and seals against. Wheels where the lip is projected out from where the spokes attach are far more prone to bending with ...


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As the others said, the edge should be ground and the tire inspected closely for any cuts in the side-wall. But, one more thing: You should get your wheel re-balanced. When you hit the curb, your rims can get warped a little and if the wheel is not probably balanced, you can get an unpleasant wobble and wear out your wheel bearing much faster.


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Wheel looks OK, but that sharp edge should be ground down. If it were my car, I would try to get a small tool between the tire and the wheel and pull the very edge of the scraped area out just enough to get in there with a file and take the sharp edge off. If you don't have the tools, or don't feel comfortable with that, then take it to a shop that does ...


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You are probably fine, it doesn't look very deep however that is a bad place to get a scratch since it can affect tire integrity. For nothing else but peace of mind on your road trip you should probably get it repaired or replaced. That can probably buff out. Many tire shops can have you in and out in 15 minutes.


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Are you planning on taking your car to a race track? If we are talking about tires and handling, the order of importance is generally as follows: Tire compound Tire width Tire construction (e.g. sidewall stiffness) Wheel width This is why race cars (real ones you see on TV) use tires that are worn out after 40 minutes of driving. They have extremely soft ...


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Wrong. Do a test. Torque one wheel unloaded and one wheel loaded. Then with both wheels unloaded, loosen them. They are not the same.


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Some research over at https://www.hubcaphaven.com/p/8892/aly59444-bmw-x5-wheel-silver-painted-36116761929.html show that these wheels (based on the partnumber 6761929) have an offset of 40mm. Given that '40' appears in the information given, I'd be pretty solid with that number.


1

If you are replacing your springs because they are sagging then yes, you will need an alignment because the new springs will raise the rear end. Raising the ride height will throw off the alignment, the bottom of the tires will point in towards the center of the car, what's known as positive camber. This will be bad for your tires because the outside of the ...


1

Short version: try it and see. Long version: The 15" tires are 2.6% larger in overall diameter than the 16" tires. This will make your speedometer read 2.6% too high and effectively reduce acceleration of the vehicle by 2.6%. At 2.6% this is not really an issue for most people, e.g. when the speedometer indicates 70 mph you are really going 72 mph - not a ...


4

It takes skill to make a GOOD weld in aluminum and it is very complicated ( expensive) to heat-treat an aluminum weld to bring the strength back to the same as the wheel , if possible at all. Routine welds in aluminum are low strength, not that some shop might say "sure we weld aluminum". It would be cheaper to buy a whole set of rims than to get a good weld....


2

Cast aluminum rims can normally be repaired. Forged aluminum is trickier. There are specialty shops that deal in repairing rims, go to one of them. This is not something you want to do yourself. If its a factory rim, consider buying a used replacement (much cheaper). See Craigslist


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It can be repaired, but I would seek a professional. Refer to this instructibles article to get an idea of the work involved. https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Repair-a-Cracked-Alloy-Wheel/


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Welding is not an option when it comes to rims especially aluminium. If it was bent you may had a chance to fix it... I would recommend replacing the rim with good quality ones.


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You can get tools just for this job - Do a search for "locking wheel nut removal tool" For example this one from Laser Tools - https://www.lasertools.co.uk/product/6972


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I would drill a 2mm hole each side and then split it open with a chisel - should either split or use a large screwdriver to turn it. I would also make a template to hold the drill steady so as not to add to the damage.


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The wheel is done, so you're better off just buying a spare. You can buy matching OEM wheels online from a variety of web sites, and also through interchange amongst full-service scrap yards. The wheel is made of aluminum and steel, and recycles nicely. Let the tire shop do it. If the tire is undamaged just have a tire shop transfer it to the new wheel. ...


-1

Yes, you should drive slowly, (not on the highway) and with the hazard lights on to the nearest wheel and tire shop and replace it. Just kidding, you'd be safer putting a spare on, but if it holds air you could drive on it in an emergency. Driving that at speed would be extremely dangerous due to increased risk of a blowout, which could send you into a ...


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Do NOT drive this at all. Change the wheel before driving it again. That can cause sudden loss of control if the bead shifts.


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Well i am not sure this should be answered but in compliance with the site rules, DON'T. Also if i may ask back isn't your tire deflated?


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I am wondering would this do any good: Lets assume we are balancing the right front wheel. Lets put the right wheel up on a stand, as if changing the tire. Turn on engine and the first gear. The differential should make sure only the raised wheel spins. Leave it running in idle and observe the wheel. Any imbalance should show up as jumping/vibration. It can ...


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