25

Do exactly what the manufacturer of the vehicle states in service information. Why do I say this? The nut rotational friction and bolt clamping force are both affected by the choice of lubricant used or lack thereof. Almost all OEM's specify no lube. This is done for several reasons. Dry results in the most thread rotational friction, a most desirable ...


17

Fatigue failures of UNTIGHTENED studs ; been there ,done that. When loose , apparently the wheel moves enough to cause fatigue. Fatigue ( axial) fractures are flat as shown in photo. Replace all the studs , it is cheaper than trying to check them for fatigue cracks. I did it on a Nissan Titan , left one front wheel finger tight and drove 900 miles and did ...


11

It may be that the rims you have are the incorrect size for your hubs. The hub center in your photos show light rusting where id expect to see some wear or rubbing from contact. Wheel studs are not intended to hold the weight of the vehicle vertically. They are designed to hold the rim sideways against the hub center. The rim should press firmly onto the ...


11

tl;dr: No. An impact wrench isn't a cure-all. The mechanic explained that sometimes lug nuts are much over torque because all shops use impact gun to tighten them. That does not cause any problem as long as they are opened using an impact wrench. Well, that's not quite true. Over-torque is bad in and of itself. At a very high level, it damages ...


10

I can see where your mechanic is coming from. The reason being that, although like Steve Cross notes, the impact wrench applies a lot of force suddenly, it applies the force in an evenly rotational direction. ANY wiggle in the socket (Which there will always be or you wouldn't be able to get it on the nut) and the breaker bar will be putting lateral force ...


8

Overtorque is the most common reason in my experience. The next most common issue is corrosion/seizing which then breaks the stud when you try to apply enough torque to remove the nut. Always use a torque wrench and apply anti-seize to prevent future problems. If those are pressed in studs you may be able to press them out and replace them. Otherwise you'...


4

In my experience, garages always tighten wheelnuts so much that you have a major challenge getting them undone if you have a puncture. While they shouldn't do this, it obviously gets them in less trouble than it would if your wheel fell off, so they will continue to do it. Using excessive force on a short bar will damage your wheel nuts. Force will not undo ...


4

I ran a service station for a short stint in Vermont and we always used Permatex anti-seize compound on the lug studs. Most of the time we would also find ourselves wire brushing the threads before removal of the nut and again before applying the anti-seize and reinstalling the lug nut. That was due to the use of salt on the roads of which the state of ...


3

Thanks to everyone for your input! Well I finally got the wheel off. After MULTIPLE cobolt bits I managed to drill down on three sides (triangle) around the broken bit and was finally able to break out the center part with the broken bit. Man I do not ever want to have to do that again. These lug nuts must have been hammered on by a 1000 pound gorilla ...


3

It's a plastic cap that covers a 17mm wheel bolt. There should be a little hook tool with the tools that came with the car to remove them. Or you can use a small screwdriver.


3

I have the service manual for the 93 Buick and you have to grind the old studs out and put a small stud in for replacement or remove the hub. You can not install the regular size stud without removing the hub!


2

Is this on the front or the back? Also, did you try taking the brake rotor off of the hub? In either case (front or back), you should be able to remove the caliper, brake pads, and rotor off of the hub. When you get down this deep, there should be plenty of room to get the studs out and replace them. EDIT: IF you cannot get the studs out, you'll need to ...


2

Most mechanics will only use an impact to take them off. They'll use a socket/wrench to put them back on, then a torque wrench to tighten them to spec. It's someone at a tire shop (without guidelines) who will use an impact gun to put the lug nuts back on. A good tire shop will at least use torque sticks to ensure the lugs are not over tightened when they ...


2

As a supplement to JeremiahD's suggestion, I would also try applying heat. There is some debate as to whether this car is fitted with nuts or bolts - if it's a nut, heat could be applied to the socket/extension bar while a turning force is applied(encourages the socket to establish thermal conductive contact with the nut) thus keeping the flame away from the ...


1

It sounds like drilling the nut until it splits is about your only choice. Have a wheel on my car showing evidence of this. Make a shield to protect the wheel from the drill and don’t break the drill in the nut.


1

IDk if you want to do this but you could take a torch to it and that might heat up the nut and expand the molecules enough to break whatever is holding it on. Slowly apply heat while using the breaker.


1

If it is that bad - then the easiest method that won’t cause damage , if done correctly, is to drill it out. I would make a metal shield to protect the ally wheel and a drill-guide to make sure the drill does not slip . You will also need to control the depth of cut but that is easy to work out using one of the other wheel bolts and it's head (or wheel nuts ...


1

For under $100 US Harbor Freight sells a locking lug nut removal tool set. It is a set of sockets that cut into the damaged nut and allow it to be removed. The advantage of the set over individual sockets is you can use progressively smaller sockets if the lug nut continues to round off.


1

In theory you could try a solid carbide, perhaps even an diamond-tipped, drill bit. Attention: Those tips are probably more expensive than a tow truck to the garage, success is not sure, and need careful handling. In practice it would be more viable, as Solar Mike commented, to remove the hub and replace it / send it to a garage.


1

tl dr: Don't use anything but the proper lug pattern/size. The biggest problem with using a lug pattern which doesn't match exactly is you will most likely never get the wheel to align correctly. It will almost always be off center. The reason? The lug holes are sized to be centered exactly on the lugs themselves (seems obvious, right?). When the lug ...


1

Personally I would say don't use it - but get it checked by a competent shop / garage they will tell you for sure. I would consider going to the breakers / scrap yards and find the same car and source a good one that way and have it checked of course with your own tyre.


1

I would be more likely to use an anti-sieze type of grease on studs or bolts that are more prone to rust. I think that the conical mating surfaces of the nut / wheel provide the friction to keep the nuts tight, so lubricated threads helps to preserve the threads with repeated removal, installation and re-torque of the nuts.


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