8

It might not be the tires so much as the alignment. If the bearing was worn but had "gotten settled" in a particular orientation, it might not have been noisy. Then you changed the alignment and started stressing it slightly differently, and now it's gotten loud. I wouldn't be too quick to blame the mechanic.


8

Sounds like your pads sticking to me. The pad should slide in smoothly ideally they should be so annoyingly smooth so that they fall out if your are not careful. I have had stuck pin and stuck piston before, both resulted in extreme pad wear on one side of the pad, or the back pad in the caliper. I have also had stuck pad, mild uneven wear, noise. In my ...


6

They look exactly the same. The threading is probably the same on both nuts. Use a hammer and flat head chisel to peen the new nut. These nuts aren't meant to be reused and as long as you're hammering into the groove it's fine


6

As @Moab stated, if it wasn't needed, it wouldn't be there. In most cases, the clip is there to maintain bearing position. Without it, the bearing walks and it drastically shortens the life of not only the bearing, but anything which the bearing comes into contact, mainly the CV joint. When the bearing walks, this puts pressure the CVJ every time you turn a ...


6

Likely a sticking caliper, if you're ok doing your own maintenance and comfortable with brakes.. Firstly just check your brake fluid level is ok and not too low (NO need to top it up!) we just don't want it to get too low during the next proceedure. If its at least half full that's fine for now. Pull one pad out from troublesome caliper and pump the brake a ...


5

I've had this issue with cars fixed at my past shops. The old tires would mask the sound of the wheel bearing starting to go bad. New tires would suddenly make the sound stand out. Old tires can also affect the wheel bearing if their wear is uneven. They could put uneven pressure on the bearing as the tire rotates. Could the shop have done it? There is a ...


5

Pretty urgent. Less urgent than say, having no friction material left on your brakes but way more urgent than any regular servicing. Driving around with a dying bearing will hurt both economy and safety but mostly safety. If the wheel is not a driven one (e.g. if it's the front wheel and your car is rear wheel drive) it's possible for the hub (and wheel) to ...


5

It looks as though the boot has split and is spewing grease all over the place. If there isn't a lot of dirt let into the boot, you should be able to just replace the boot (yes, this is a chore, but a heck of a lot cheaper than replacing the half-shaft). When you replace the boot, you'll want to put some grease back into it to supplement what was lost. If ...


5

I've replaced bearings without either a puller or a press, it's perfectly doable, although a bearing insertion set does make things much easier. These are cheap and you can get them off the internet. Failing that you can do without. Bearing race removal: First you need a hammer, punch, gloves, safety glasses, a torch and a piece of scrap wood to go ...


4

The faster you travel wind noise will often shroud noises that the vehicle is making so don't think that the fault has gone away at that point. It depends really on how bad the bearing is with regards to what driving it's ok to continue with, really a failed bearing should be replaced ASAP. Some bearings will just hum along for months and months.. But that ...


4

My father had the exact same problem that you describe on his 2007 Honda CR-V and it turned out to be a drive shaft. Apparently they fail quite regularly on this model. Replacing the shaft resolved the issue.


4

To identify a worn bearing, raise your car, run it, and put a scope etc. on the hub. The weight of the front end will produce different noise, with the car in the air. Jack it up, Use a screwdriver, and have a friend spin the wheel, while you listen on the hub. If its bad you'll hear it.


4

Fist thing is to check that the bearings have been torqued properly, over tightening is easy to do and a common problem on newly replaced bearings. Also if one bearing goes it is sensible to replace the other side at the same time. It is also very easy to get grit in the bearing grease whcih can cause very early failure. Equally it could something ...


4

As well as the items mentioned in @Orb and @Chris answers, it's also worth checking the flexi hose to the brake for any signs of swelling - sometimes the rubber can perish and swell, causing the hose to behave like a one-way valve - as you press the pedal, there's enough pressure to force the fluid through to apply the brake, but when you release, the fluid ...


3

Inner and outer bearing parts should stay together, as the wear patterns and small irregularities "match". If you mix them, then you risk premature failure - if you have a high use then you should replace them, also the time to replace may outweigh the initial cost of new ones now. If the use is low then you may get away with it.


3

This is a bit of a difficult question to answer over the internet because none of us can physically be there to observe the symptoms you're describing. However though, cars are just like any other man made functional device used on a daily basis. You could go in for an oil change and your piston rod bearing could fail. Is this the lube shop's fault? There is ...


3

This is a job for a slide hammer - fixed to the hub and will apply the force directly in the most useful direction.


3

It isn't integral with the rotors, but the bearings are integral with the hub itself. It comes as a unit, which attaches to the steering knuckle. The rotor is separate and attaches over the lugs (wheel studs) onto the hub. You cannot change out just the bearing itself from the hub, at least they really aren't made that way. This is very common on modern day ...


2

This is the part that lets the wheel go round. It is very urgent that you repair it. The bearing can seize and cause your car to swerve at whatever speed you are going and hit something/somebody. I would not use the car until it is fixed.


2

The 07 Altimas (the automatics) have a CVT that seems infamously noisy from cursory research. Is it like the noise you hear around 30 seconds into https://youtu.be/WblGvAPPGX4?t=30? It's tough to hear over him talking but you can hear it "winding down" in the background when he pulls his foot off the pedal. Apparently there are a lot of complaints of ...


2

Bad bearings CAN produce heat, depending on the exact bearing failure it could under circumstances also produce very significant heat (in extreme cases they could get so hot that the grease is burning) but that is no effective indicator since fluctuations of pad brake pad pressure/effectiveness and other factors can also produce heat. Under circumstances a ...


2

While you'd want to believe the mechanic will catch/fix everything, it really is beyond their control. They may or may not have checked it when up on the lift, but really, if that had found it, you'd still be paying for the work, so it isn't like they are charging you extra if you take it back there and they fix it for you. You might be able to ask for a ...


2

The hub has to be removed so that the old stud can be pushed out and the new one pressed in, but the bearing does not need to be removed from the hub itself. Perhaps the mechanic was talking about the "hub bearing unit or "hub bearing assembly"... As for the ball joints being "cut"- I am not sure why the mechanic said "cut"- cracked is more relevant as the ...


2

I would use a "listening stick" - long screwdrivers work or a stethoscope... Both of which I have used with success, but identifying noise and isolating exactly which is responsible is an arcane art and mistakes are still possible...


2

Differentiating between wheel bearing noise and CV joint noise is difficult. Several times, I have replaced wheel bearings at the owner's direction, only to find later that the problem was the CV joint. With the wheel up, I would see if there is ANY play in the wheel horizontally or vertically. If not, my experience would say that it is more probable that ...


2

There's a few possibilities: The bearing is defective: a bad bearing would cause noise Badly installed bearing: if the mechanic installed the wrong bearing, installed it wrong, didn't grease it properly, etc then it would likely make noise. Whatever the mistake the bearing should be replaced with new as it could have been damaged Something else is rubbing: ...


2

These are sealed units, and usually the grease is good for the life of the bearing - unless water has gotten in. The back cover will be either pressed in, or the housing peened over the edge of it, so getting them apart, and as importantly, getting them back together and sealed up, might be challenging. I did some very similar ones on a Chevy a while ago, ...


1

Did you have to beat the old rotors off? It sounds like you have a dust cover/backing plate rubbing the rotor when turning right. Probably on the bottom of the rotor since it will flex ever so slightly during a turn. If you were to remove the rotor, you should see a shiny spot on the dust cover somewhere. Or you could use a long screwdriver or something ...


1

The only sounds I can hear are the rubber CV boots squeaking as they rotate, and a bit of disc pad to disc contact which is normal. I can't hear any bearing noise. A wheel/tyre size change may change the rotational sound freqencies & characteristics a little but not do much as far as creating bearing issues. Well not unless there was some extreme ...


1

Rear wheels can be put out of alignment by hitting kerbs etc. Fitting hub bearings, either semi, 3/4, or fully floating types does not affect the alignment, but collapsed bearings will - however other problems are more obvious... As for adjustment , some of the fixings are designed with eccentric bushes ie the hole is off-centre to allow adjustment, or the ...


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