Hot answers tagged

20

Fish plating a frame is typically used when someone is building a custom frame and two pieces of steel are met and a plate is created to overlap both pieces to add structure support:


10

How can I shorten a drive shaft? The easiest way to shorten a drive shaft is by taking it to the shop and having them do the work for you, to include balancing. I take it this is not what you're asking for though, so here goes: Are there any warnings before proceeding? There are three big issues with shortening the drive shaft (DS): Length Squareness ...


8

A useful technique with MIG on thin metal is to create the weld by a series of overlapping tacks rather than a continuous run ie strike the arc, create a puddle then release the trigger and repeat, starting the next tack on the edge of the previous one. Here you want to use a bit more current than the minimum to ensure decent penetration, the pause between ...


6

NOTE: My original answer addressed only the cargo cover attachment point. If you're trying to secure the tailgate strut attachment point: I can't see any way to proceed that doesn't involve removing the plastic trim from this area. It isn't super difficult but it will be tedious to carefully remove the brittle plastic fasteners holding the trim in place ...


6

That exhaust looks well beyond the point of welding, even internally sleeving it would leave nothing around the outside to weld to.. I mean you could try gas welding it but to be honest I can't see any weld job lasting more then a day or so, theres just not enough good material left unfortunately... Especially towards that box section in the picture.


6

You have a couple of options: Open butt joint Butt joint with backing Lap Joint Offset joint Open Butt Joint Source I would not recommend this for joining frame rails, even though some manufactures (Toyota for example) recommend this type joint for sectioning procedures. Butt joint with a backing Can be made from a piece of one of the frame rails, or ...


5

TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) is used generally on thinner metals and or aluminum. It would have less penetration than MIG (Metal Inert Gas) Welding. I would not recommend TIG welding the Frame on any vehicle.


5

I would recommend checking the regulations of an appropriate race series, as anything that meets or exceeds these specifications should also be suitable for road use. For example, the UK MSA regulations on Roll-over protection state: K1.3.8. Guidance on Welding. All welding should be of the highest possible quality with full penetration and preferably ...


5

I was watching the show called Stacey David's Gearz ... it's one of those Saturday morning vehicle shows (at least that's the time I see it). He's been around the block a couple of times and his shows are a little cheezy, but he seems very knowledgeable. This one episode I saw, he was shortening the frame of a C10 to take it from a long bed to a short bed ...


5

It is always possible to repair something like this no matter how bad it is, it is just a matter of whether the work needed is worth the cost. If you need to pay someone to do the welding for you, then you will be wasting money on an exhaust that will probably fail somewhere else soon. If you have a friend who can do the welding they should be able to wrap ...


4

If you are in a country where cars get mandatory safety inspections, don't even think about it - any "non-standard-looking" repair will only attract the attention of the inspector, not just to the exhaust but to everything else on the car that might have been "repaired" to the same standard. Just get the failed section(s) of the exhaust system replaced with ...


4

Plastic welding is great for a small crack or slit in the surface of the bumper. However, it is not structurally sound enough to reattach a broken mounting tab. I've tried; it never works. The one thing you might try, if you're short on cash (although that estimate you posted seemed reasonable) is to get a two-component polyurethane adhesive (actually ...


4

Just because the cost of auto darkening is the same now, that hasn't always been the case. When they were new, the tech was much more expensive. When you're starting out and buying tools, you don't have much money, so you get the basics you can afford and build from that. If you start with a manual hood, you're going to learn with that and get used to it, ...


3

You need to sort out the alternator, once that is functioning correctly then check out the sensor issue - my car is very susceptible to showing spurious issues when there is low voltage and they all disappear when the voltage is fine. As for the welding - well, best practice is to disconnect the battery and some even go as far as to disconnect the alternator ...


3

Mig welder is what I use for welding nuts to broken fasteners, 100-120 amps or better should do it on that size bolt. Stick welder about the same amps, use a 6013 rod, 6011 for better penetration if needed. My amp recommendations are general in nature, you want the most heat and penetration you can get quickly without melting the nut completely.


3

I made the repair as follows: -blasted the manifold casting -shaped a "nickle" to fit over the hole (the coin is mostly copper) -heated manifold in a household over to 400F -used bronze braze to attach the trimmed coin to the manifold -replaced manifold in oven, and baked for 2 hours, then let the temperature drop over several hours Since then, about 80 ...


2

I've had success brazing cracks in castings, but haven't tried patching them like you suggest. But it seems like it should work… All we did by way of pre- and post-heat was to warm the part overall with a rosebud, and then let it cool slowly after brazing. It certainly seems worth a try.


2

Without an actual picture and the ambiguous verbage used, here's your options: most often, minor crashes do not damage the bumper itself but the "clips" that hold it on. With the proper tools, you can remove your bumper cover, replace any damaged "clips" and then reinstall the bumper cover if the cover itself is cracked, your quote listed the part as $370. ...


2

As a viable alternative, wrap the drain plug threads with a few turns of PTFE "plumbers" tape on reassembly.


2

If you can It would be a more permanent repair if you could remove the sump, drill out the old worn threads and carefully weld a new nut onto the sump, either on the inside or outside.. This would give you a brand new thread to work with, and is a far more robust repair.


2

It looks like the exhaust split at the flange right behind the catalytic converter - if my eyeballs are correct this can be an expensive fix (300-500 just for the part in my area), as the rot seems to be on the flange of the converter. Not something you can get away with yourself if you are in an emission controlled area.


2

Penetration is only a key point if you are welding structurally. For body panels you are just trying to first stitch it together (as you are showing in the pictures), but then you need to fill in between the stitches so the weld is complete all the way around. Then, once you grind it down, you have a complete seem without gaps. The "stitching" process is a ...


1

This section appears to be pretty far gone from the picture. Take a body hammer or a thicker screw driver and tap/stab the metal to see where it is brittle. Your best bet is to strip the paint off to see how far the compromised area actually goes. From there you can cut out the metal, form a similar piece and weld it in.


1

My suggestion is to take a Dremel tool or a angle grinder and clean out the weld, then you'll be able to back the nut off. The threads are already buggered from the welding which they were accosted with. Clean up the weld the best you can off of the shaft (and I mean really clean them up), then back the nut off, which should pull whatever debris off of them ...


1

As other answers have said it is possible to weld manifolds but it's not easy nor guaranteed to be successful. A lot will depend upon where the hole is and how good the guy is doing the welding. Some just can't be salvaged. Nine times out of ten you're going to be much better off just replacing the affected part - unfortunately as you've already discovered ...


1

Welding sheet metal is tricky even with a TIG welder under ideal conditions in a shop. MIG & stick are even riskier. Your situation offers MANY points of failure. Even if you can get a torch into the back side of the battery tray mount, there may not be enough metal left to weld. I would suggest you use a "cooler" low-tech approach like a rivet nut ...


1

If possible.. try drilling a hole.. big enough for a large screwdriver and a replacement nut to fit through.. in the side of the subframe, in front of OR right next to the area where the captive nut is spinning. Stick the large screwdriver through the hole using the hole itself and the flat of the screwdriver as a lever to jam the captive nut to stop it ...


1

I encountered a similar problem some time ago changing a wishbone on a Mk3 Golf. The solution was to replace the subframe with a good second hand unit purchased cheaply from a vehicle breakers yard which was thoroughly cleaned and painted before fitting to prevent corrosion. Depending on what access is like, you could potentially cut an opening in the ...


1

There are a few reasons. Firstly the first few generations of auto lenses had several drawbacks: they were expensive, had a restricted field of vision, and in some cases didn't give such a clear view of the weld as fixed shade lenses – especially metal coated ones. This is particularly important for MMA and TIG welding where you need to be able to see the ...


1

practise, practise, practise... Also, don't attempt butt joints - get a tool (usually air driven) to swage the edge about 1/2 inch to allow an overlap which helps prevent blow-through. Good luck...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible