Hot answers tagged

25

In aggregate yes, however that's not the same as saying all large vehicles are safer than all small ones. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety aggregates and publishes data about fatality rates in new vehicles in the US. You can see a general trend toward larger being safer, but bigger being safer is not guaranteed. The IIHS also publishes data ...


13

Looking at this page, it shows the curb weight of a Volkswagen Passat B5.5 1.9 TDI 130 6sp to be 1342 kg. Subtracting this from your number, it comes up with 83 kg for your driver weight, or about 183 lbs for us 'Mericans ;-) This should be fairly close as long as it is the same spec as yours. It should be fairly close, though. I'd imagine there are some ...


13

This is a question that has been addressed by Consumer Reports and other publications that are easily accessible via a Google search. To provide an answer to your question, larger cars are not necessarily safer, according the the US Dept of Energy and the Berkley Lab's research. The Berkley lab article also notes that vehicles are being made lighter with ...


13

Would this be safe? tl;dr: No. It's hard to say exactly how unsafe or how bad the consequences might be. Assuming the rails themselves weigh on the order of 5-10 kg, you're talking about almost doubling the advised load on the whole system. From reading that advisory, it's hard to say exactly what failure modes their mechanical engineers are expecting. ...


7

I read an interesting article a while back that views the question slightly differently. Their take is basically that it is likely any additional safety for the occupants will be a pyrrhic gain, imposing a disproportionate safety risk to those around you for a small personal gain. The “Arms Race” On American Roads: The Effect Of Sport Utility Vehicles And ...


7

tl;dr: It depends on many factors. Size is not a magic spell of safety. Let's break down the first paragraph from the same previously cited IIHS link: By far the largest number of motor vehicle crash deaths are occupants of passenger vehicles including cars, minivans, pickups, SUVs and cargo/large passenger vans. The likelihood of crash death varies ...


7

All other things being equal, a bigger (more massive) car would be safer – for its occupants. But all other things are rarely equal, either in the design of the car or in the dynamics of the crash. Hence crash testing and endless debates about passive and active safety… So, if you're looking for a safe car, you really need to look at the data on the ...


7

Regardless of weight, the advisory height limit of 50 cm will likely be violated if the plan is to carry the two kayaks on their sides. I'd advise against doing so for this reason alone.


4

An online search lead to, 440 lbs if its a 250cid motor. Closer to 500lbs if it is a 292cid motor. The 292 is about 2 inches longer so it weighs more.


4

You'll need to know the weight of the trailer and it's maximum capacity (which should be on a plate on the trailer, for any reasonably recent trailer), the maximum towing weight of the car (which should be on the data plate under the bonnet - for a UK spec one it's 750kg unbraked or 1700kg braked), and any restrictions on your licence. It'll then be the ...


4

Depends on your comfort level. AC system (complete, condensor, compressor, evap, piping, etc), stereo, and every bit of interior except the seats and critical controls. Glovebox, airbags, related control modules, wiring, door panels, carpet, insulation, sound deadening materials, even the entire dashboard can be removed and the critical instrumentation and ...


3

The electric, toy quad is made for kids "ages 8+". The average weight for an 8 year old is 50 lbs, so the 30lb number is obviously not the rider weight limit. I think it's pretty clear that the rider weight limit is 120 lbs. It's a toy, so you can't expect nice detailed specifications of "payload capacity" or "towing capacity" or anything else that would ...


3

I regularly used to drive a Vauxhall Agila of the same age with large loads on the roof (bikes, roof boxes, long lengths of wood/plumbing/ladders, small boats, a big TV, and even a bath). My biggest concern was always the stability of the car, It is really light and tall, so too much on the roof lifts the centre of gravity high up. Couple this with cross-...


2

The spare tire and jack are a good place to start. Lots of weight there, and most people would not change a tire on the side of the road and have their vehicle towed instead. This has the added benefit of freeing up space in the trunk for things people are likely to use, like booster cables, windshield washer fluid container and a jerry can.


2

Short answer: no. When crashing a small and large car together, there might be a difference, but you'd be far better off, as others have said, examining the specific safety scores and record of each individual model. If yes, should it serve as a safety guideline when purchasing a car? Hypothetically: If people based their purchasing on the size of the ...


2

I'm seeing your towing capacity for the PT to be ~2200lbs. Please remember, this towing capacity also includes any weight which is on the inside of the vehicle, such as people and cargo. If you are moving an entire household, you'll most likely exceed this by quite a bit. Most of the hitches I'm seeing available for the PT are only rated at 2000lbs, so you'...


2

Adding weight will change the resonant frequency of the handlebars, yes. But if the weight you added made that resonance closer to the problem frequency, then it can amplify them dramatically. It is always worth experimenting with weights, but also steering dampers. Altering both can help you get rid of unwanted vibrations. I'd be tempted to suggest it may ...


2

tl dr: Actually, it's not something which is imposed by the law, it's something which is there by design. Don't do it as it's not safe. There's several things which goes into this: Power: You have to have the power to get your vehicle moving. If it is underpowered for the load, you can run into issues merging into traffic or climbing a hill (yah, I'm ...


2

As HandyHowie says, the rated towing specs of a car are not about the amount it can pull, but the amount it can control - in in particular, the amount of braking available. The heavier the trailing load is relative to the tow vehicle, the less stable the combination is - you'll find plenty of videos on youtube of what happens next. Vehicles designed for ...


1

Basically, there is no difference between the two. Weight is weight. It will affect the braking, take off, fuel mileage, etc., pretty much the same either way (rolling resistance of the tires may have an effect, but it shouldn't be too much). Towing is a little easier on the suspension because the car itself isn't handling the overall weight. Most vehicles ...


1

Yes, a stiffer torsion bar (aka anti-roll bar) will reduce weight transfer. Say you're turning left: as the car begins to turn, the weight is shifted to the right, and the right suspension (spring + strut) begin to compress due to the extra load. As the suspension compresses, the anti-roll bar is also pressed down. Depending on the stiffness of the anti-...


1

In my opinion the safer car is the best handling one. I believe all these analyses are for deaths in case of a crash. A better handling car avoids many crashes but is lighter (in order to handle better) and has a higher death rate per crash. I always prefer the best handling car to avoid as many crashes as possible since cars are made safe for crashes with ...


1

it is very dependant on design and construction - Euro NCAP rating is probably a good indicator for you. For example, the 2015 Honda Jazz (a Supermini) scored 5 stars whilst the 2016 Hilux (Pickup Truck) scored only three Clearly size isn't everything!


1

Any additional weight in the passenger compartment will be spread across all four wheels, but obviously not equally. If the additional weight is nearer the rear wheels, they will receive more of the weight, but some will be on the front. So extra passengers would make it more likely for you to ground the front of the car. To lift the front of the car you ...


1

Personally, I would try it. Assuming there was a built in safety factor, I loaded 100 lbs of mountain bike/rack onto the 75 lb limited factory roof rails/cross bars on an '04 Toyota RAV4, and other than a little bit of flexing in the cross bars, there were zero issues after an hour of 70+ mph highway cruising. Just to make sure, I would strap them on and ...


1

I don't think it's necessary to go into specifics. Just generally speaking you can already determine that it is not a good idea. These things are tested to breaking point and then a large safety margin is applied. By overloading the rack by 30% while driving at the fastest speeds it will have been tested at you are eating up a large portion of the safety ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible