4

I won't say a good alternator will "never" charge at 16.5vdc, but keeping it there for any length of time will boil the battery very quickly. Your line of thinking is correct in that a good alternator should be charging in the 14.1-14.5vdc as long as there's no major load on it. If there is, the voltage will be down some from this. When it starts ...


3

One would expect that the fins are currently aligned with the airflow. Cutting holes or grooves perpendicular to the fins is not likely to improve the cooling by a large factor. Some turbulence can be expected by airflow over the holes or grooves, but it's likely to be offset by the lack of surface area caused by the removal of the material. Consider ...


3

No. You need to connect the wire on terminal 30 to the wire on terminal 51, that is assuming you have not replaced the wire to the generator. If you have then you need to connect the alternator to the battery positive with a with suitable for the current output of the alternator. Then you need to find the ignition warning light wire and perhaps use the ...


2

I wouldn't worry too much. You can go a little deeper in checking the system. But you will need a load tester. I wouldn't worry about 0.4v. You could turn on as many loads ad you can. Head lights/hi and low beam, a.c., blower motor, and radio. And check the voltage.


2

While the answer by Paulster2 is good, I have something to add. It matters where the voltage is measured! If you measure the voltage close to the alternator, it can be greater than when measured in the battery terminals. The reason is Ohmic voltage loss. To save costs, wires in cars are typically thin and the voltage loss can be great if there's a lot of ...


2

It depends on the car and the age. You don't specify make and model, but on Jaguars the charge control is matched to the "newer" type of battery which is calcium based and the voltage can be higher 15.5v during parts of the charging cycle. Older charging limits varied between 14.2 to 14.8 volts depending on the state of charge and if the battery had just ...


2

I would check the grounding straps, engine to body, engine to battery or body to battery. On some vehicles they are fitted across the gearbox mount - shorter so cheaper...


2

This sounds like a poor or loose connection or a broken cable somewhere. You need to check, inspect and test each cable and connection between the battery and the alternator - including all the ground cables / connections. When testing the cables you need to pull or stretch them to check they are physically ok.


1

Here is the 4 pin diagram, it has never changed over the years for external regulators. A= Battery, to alt and battery. I= Charging indicator on instrument cluster F= Field (alt) S= Stator (Alt)


1

Short answer: 1. Yes 2. All But really, your bikes magneto should be able to keep your battery charged while you're riding without increasing wire size and changing the bulbs. I would clean up the grounds and all connections, put a little dialectic grease on each one, make sure they're tight. If that doesn't solve your issue I'd be more likely to turn my ...


1

Removing mass from the cooling fins will actually hurt the cooling ability of the cooling fins. There are three ways (I can think of) to help with the cooling of the fins: Increase the area and/or mass of the cooling fins. I think @fred_dot_u covers this in his answer. Increase the air flow going over the fins. This can be done by creating some small ...


1

So a “new original” alternator - 6v or 12v.. You put a 12v ignition system so the battery needs to be 12v and so does the alternator and the regulator. If those things are mis- matched then they won’t work, it seems lucky that it runs.


1

13.5 V is a bit low even at battery terminals. If you have a two-wire alternator, it is much, much too low at the alternator output terminal. You said your alternator has a separate signal wire. If that is used, it means you don't have a two-wire alternator. I would bump up the voltage by 1 volt to 14.5 V at the battery terminals, if possible. This may mean ...


1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAN_bus#CAN_bus_monitor Control Area Network Bus (CanBus) is the data network protocol on modern cars that controls engine, transmission and other vehicle functions. +BM is the positive supply reference input for a bus module on the CAN That voltage must be within certain limits or there is a fault elsewhere in the system. The ...


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