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3

I have accepted Paulster2's answer to give credit. This answer is to provide further context. It turns out that the bulb is not an H4 or H7, but something that is called a D1S which is not exactly cheap, but can certainly be replaced without replacing the entire headlight enclosure. There's enough of a base on the bulb that I don't think Paulster2's ...


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Yes, I would agree it looks like your headlight is going out. Volvo no longer sells the V70 here in the States (we have the XC70, but not a V70 in 2014, anyway). With that said, the other Volvo models use an H7 main headlight and an H9 for high beams (please check with the store for your particular application UPDATE - Per the OP's answer, the bulb is ...


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Here is where the jump points are for your V70: Positive jump point is located behind the fuse box by the strut tower: The negative jump point is located to the right side of the engine (as if sitting in the driver's seat) where you can see the clamp on the metal loop: Attache them in this order (per Volvo):


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You can find the parts list for Volvo online here. The link of interest will be Home> Volvo> V70> 2001> Electrical system> Switches, turn indicators, main and dipped beams, WIPER/WASHER And it looks like the smallest part they sell is the entire turn signal switch. It looks like they run between $67 and $148.. Hmm.. not cheap. The price depends on the ...


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Almost certainly a poor connection within the bulb holder. You might be able to clean up the connections within the holder with a fine bit of sandpaper or "wet and dry", then adjust them with a tiny screwdriver to improve the contact, but it's probably easier to get a new unit...


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A mechanic friend of mine took a look at it and we found the issue when a 1cm long spark was arcing over from the ignition cable to some metal nearby. After fixing it with some gaffer tape the engine ran without issues. It needs to be replaced and then should be good to go!


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Seems like fuel, but you might be over-thinking it... Cheap enough to replace the fuel filter to eliminate that. But before I did that, I'd put a fuel pressure gauge on the injector rail and route it so you can duct tape it to the windshield, or pin it under the windshield wiper. Then duplicate the problem, observing fuel pressure. You might actually have ...


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