12

The following repair is cheap, easy and should last for 3 to 5 or more years depending on your climate, but it's not the "correct way" either. Remove the rust, paint and body protection around the hole with a wire brush wheel. Extend the area until you have clean, non-rusted metal all around the hole. Cut some glass fiber pads that cover the hole and all of ...


8

I have no idea if this is legal where you live, or what tools or supplies you have, but this is what I would do to repair a junker/beater. I have used this for quick farm fixes without welding. You will need; a piece of sheet metal a few inches larger than the rusted area drill and bits pop rivet gun and rivets some kind of sealant Now the fix; Clean the ...


7

Your car is ten years younger (and has 1/10th the miles) but I suspect I know exactly where you hit. Most likely, the scrape you heard was the plastic under tray. This piece does what it says on the tin: it sits under the engine and catches drips, spills and leaks. It has the side benefit of sitting lower than critical pieces (like the front differential)...


7

If it hit directly under the front seats, there shouldn't be much to worry about - most of the important bits are further forward or further back. as @spicetraders says, try to have a look underneath and see if there are any scrapes or signs of leaks - a good torch/flashlight is essential. No noises is a good sign, as the most vulnerable part in the middle ...


6

I'm tall and can't quite stand up straight in my transit, or at least not with my feet together. It's not as bad as you think, even when cooking. Even to get this much height I had to be mean with the insulation. Mostly I think about insulation against the cold as I use the van in the UK/France and it doesn't have a/c. There isn't much difference when it ...


5

You can fix that by removing the remaining rusted metal, and welding some new steel there. There's really no other way if you live in an area with mandatory yearly car inspections. Try to patch the hole using a simpler way, and you soon find yourself with a failed mandatory inspection. Welding isn't expensive. If you don't have the required skills, you can ...


4

The very best solution is to powder-coat them - but you need to get them to a paint-ready condition before you take them to the powder-coating company; otherwise, it could cost quite a bit. Harbor Freight sell powder-coating kits, but I've never tried them, and if this is a one-off job, sending it to a company will be the most cost-effective solution. ...


3

If you are not worried about appearances (or failing a vehicle inspection) and the main goal is just to prevent further rusting and closing the hole: Remove the rust as much as possible (wire brush, maybe cut of the worst bits with a angle grinder or hacksaw). Dab some rust-stopper/sealant over it to stop further corrosion. (Some leftover Hammerite from ...


2

I don't think putting part of the insulation outside the bodyshell is going to be very effective. Metal is pretty good at conducting heat/cold, so your floor will tend to have the same temperature as the outside walls and roof: When it's cold outside, the interior heat will be transported from the floor to the walls, cooling down the interior. You have to ...


2

Aerospace landing gear applications usually require springs to be coated in Duralon (name brand), which is a Nylon compound that is applied much like a powder coat. It is used for its flexibility, impact and corrosion resistance, and it provides a smooth, clean finish so damage and defects are easier to visibly identify.


2

I doubt this is CV joint/axle related as if that was the case you'd feel the vibration regardless of the throttle position. If the problem only occurs during acceleration I'd lean more towards the possibility of a failing/worn engine mount or pitch stopper/dog bone.


2

Definitely do the screwdriver poke! I found a gorgeous 1999 Jeep Cherokee. Naive at the excitement of the price I failed to look at the underside. The inspection center poked and prodded. By the time the inspection was completed (and failed), I had a hole in my muffler system along with about $2,500 worth of rust related repairs for a $1000 vehicle. Lesson ...


2

Its possibly just surface rust. However to check you're going to have to do the squeeze test between fingers and thumb on the thicker structural sections, then if you still can't determine how severe or not the rust is.. Its time to get an old screwdriver out and tap (with the handle part) on the rustiest bits. If the material is corroded right through ...


2

The metal strip does not look like it's part of the vehicle. My suggestion is to pull it out. When you do, use some kind of silicone caulking or even black Permatex sealant to plug the hole. You don't need moisture getting into the vehicle from the underbody.


1

If that is the worst rust on the vehicle, then I would say you have bought a solid car and there is nothing to worry about as far as rust is concerned at the moment. A wire brush down and a coat of under seal should keep that rust at bay.


1

It appears to be attached to a plastic undertray, and looks like it's a parts label of some sort. If you're near the dealer, you can have them take it off (it'll be covered under the warranty), or you should just be able to strip it off yourself.


1

That definitely is a strange looking "metal." If in doubt, I've had pretty good luck with this rubberized undercoating. It boasts a "rust encapsulator" formula as well. Remember, prep is 90% of it working properly. Also as a preventative measure, you can buy rubber caps/pucks for jacks and jack stands from multiple places, so you never have and metal to ...


1

It looks like the underbody coating got peeled of, exposing the zinc-coated sheetmetall. The photo does not show the zinc being ruptured, albeit the mentioned dynamic makes it possible that the rust barrier got penetrated. Either way the thick coating needs to be repaired as it protects the zinc from mechanical (stone chips) damage. I would cure this with ...


1

Depending on the type of plastic/PVC, if the pipes are too close to an exhaust manifold then yes it's likely that it will melt or at least suffer. However if the pipes are a good few inches away from say a rear exhaust box or pipe then you may be ok, as the rear of an exhaust system is not as hot as the manifold end. You could place a small piece of the ...


1

An old thread, but still, ...in houses it is accepted as BEST practice to insulate OUTSIDE the existing brick walls, rather than inside If you insulate inside you will inevitably get cold spots, and that's where the moisture will condense, causing damp, mould, etc. etc. all in hidden little corners where it's difficult to see and difficult to deal with. If ...


1

This noise could be from any part of the car on some type of flexible mounting : suspension parts or even the exhaust. Another possibility is that there is a loose bolt or screw in a cavity under the seat for example (had that and a so & so to find...). updated after your edit.


1

Check the engine mount or the main pulley (balancing shaft harmonic balancer).


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