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14

Sounds like a lean condition Here's something to chew on regarding identifying a lean or rich condition on a motorcycle. Symptoms of Lean or Rich carb settings on a motorcycle What I believe you are hearing is backfiring. It isn't loud because the baffling systems on modern motorcycles are so effective. If you have a lean condition that suddenly appears ...


9

It depends on how you do the skipping If, when you do it, you hear loud clunks, that means you are not matching the RPM's to the road speed, to the transmission. Motorcycles have a synchronous transmission with with relatively fragile shift forks operated by a shift drum. The forks move the gears side to side to engage. if you are hearing a loud 'clack' ...


7

From the picture it looks as if your brushes are completely worn out. If there's no other fault, that is (theoretically) an easy and cheap fix. It appears however that getting brushes for this particular starter isn't as easy as it normally should be. For more information have a look at this thread: http://www.tiger800.co.uk/index.php/topic,11947.0.html as ...


6

Popping I too have a Tiger 800xc (2013) and have noticed it popping when downshifting and revs are too high for that gear. I did notice a significant difference in this behavior after 12,000 mile service, and using 91 RON fuel (not all brands and outlets are same... for me ARCO has worked best). At this point, I consider some of it as normal behavior. ...


5

Frequently, a motorcyclist will adjust his/her front forks up or down in the triple clamps to change trail and rake on the bike. Changing trail and rake on a motorcycle can effect the handling of the vehicle and change the weight distribution under cornering and braking. Increasing the rake makes the bike more stable at higher speeds and decreases ...


4

From what I can tell, the later models (2002 / 2003) had a new fuel map and were a lot smoother. It ought to be possible to remap the ECU on the bike or possibly replace it with one from a later model. If you find a prospective bike to purchase ride it and see how it feels. It may be that the fuel map on the bike has already been adjusted, if not, budget ...


3

It's not oil or fork fluid, I think you have a leak in your front brake caliper (whichever side you saw the fluid on), which is why your braking seems ineffective: You're losing brake fluid, which is why your brake fluid is low in the reservoir Air is being sucked into your brake lines, air compresses so they are spongy As for what's happening my guess is ...


3

The 2015 is a reworked engine The 2015 Triumph Speed Triple engine is a bit different from the 2012. Different cams, crank, connecting rods, pistons, etc. The clutch plates in the 2015 are a bit larger in diameter. The clutch plates you found may barely fit but I would not use them. They are different part numbers.


3

There are companies that can recondition these, at least here in the UK. I have had one of mine done before in a couple of days. I assume they must use common components due to the fast turn around.


2

As Brian Knoblauch stated, fuel injection systems normally shut off the fuel delivery completely when the engine is in an "overrun" state, i.e. when you get off the accelerator completely with the vehicle in gear and the RPMs sufficiently high. In this sense, you can't be too lean in overrun--it's perfectly acceptable to have no injection at all. As for ...


1

Largely, it's the oil pump making the high pitched whir. To a lesser extent, in the following order fuel pump>>air induction>>tune of exhaust. So, no it will never sound like a Triumph. From top to bottom, the engines are designed differently.


1

This problem can be resolved by using TuneECU TuneECU is a free tool supported by a community. I am unsure if it's open source. This tool can access your ECU and change individual settings within the map based upon throttle position and RPM. You will want to download map number 10166 and upload that map into your ECU via the TuneECU application. This ...


1

The on/off throttle transitions can be resolved by a mixture of remapping ECUs (in the case of a fuel injected bike) or re-jetting the carburetors as well as fitting a "Throttle Tamer Tube" to your accelerator handle. Basically its a slightly different shaped cam on the Throttle handle that slows down/speeds up the transition so between on and off throttle ...


1

It's very possible that there's no difference to the calibration itself. It depends on the manufacturer, but you'll commonly see revisions that are simply an operating system or process change, where the logic that interprets the tables gets tweaked, but the actual calibration data remains the same. If you look at the actual MAP file in hexadecimal, and the ...


1

You might have a tear in your CV carburetor diaphragm At the tops of your carburetors there is a cover with 4 screws that gives access to your CV diaphragm and slide. The CV (constant velocity) carbs adjust for barometric pressure automatically. The difference in pressure from your intake tract and the atmosphere raises and lowers you slide that has the ...


1

Throttle never reads 0% as the throttle plate angle is around 25~30 degree's. RPM should not 'hang' on a fuel injected bike, you may have leaking injectors or fuel pump regulator may not be working properly? Your much more likely to get after-fire in exhaust system on over run. What year is the 600? I know early ones had some issues but all the newer ...


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