Hot answers tagged

24

No, hubcaps are purely cosmetic and do not need to be fitted. Some designs improve fuel economy and reduce wind noise by having a fairly flat surface but a car with one or more missing hubcaps is perfectly safe and in the UK, for example, hubcaps are not required to pass the annual MOT (safety inspection).


6

Yes, 9 is the stem length in the graphic you have pictured.


4

Behind the handle are two studs with nuts that hold the handle in place. You will need to take the interior door panel off and reach into the door to tighten these nuts.


3

TL DR: This isn't how it's supposed to be. They should be the same from side to side ... however ... However, stuff happens. As Solar Mike aluded to, things happen on the assembly line which can give you the wrong options. More than likely the dealership never even noticed, or maybe they did notice and that's why they made it the convenience vehicle. ...


3

The shiny plastic part of the lock lever is attached by a clip onto a metal rod that continues into the door panel and connects to the locking mechanism. The shiny plastic knob must be removed in order to pull away the faux woodgrain plastic panel that surrounds the door handle and lock lever. The plastic part of the lock lever can be removed by working ...


3

The instructions for cutting the piece out of it for the Auxiliary Heater are for when you are installing a new (or replacing rather) the wheel housing liner. You just need to follow the instructions for removal, not for modification, even if the Auxiliary Heater is present.


3

It obviously depends very much on what kind of trim pieces you are wanting to respray. What they are made of and the sort of finish you are after. I am not sure what the trim is you wish to renovate but most cars of the last. 25-30 years or more have utilised some form of moulded hard plastic or softer rubberised style materials. Hard plastics are ...


3

Yes Depends on how long it is on there, when the glue dries out it can be hard to remove without damaging the paint (if you need to do remove them for some reason), also the paint will not match anymore as the rest of the car will fade slightly, the paint under the molding will not. See 2


3

Get something like 3M Super Weatherstrip Adhesive or Permatex Super Weatherstrip Adhesive. Follow the directions on the product. You'll probably want to use some painter's tape (the blue stuff) to keep the trim in place while it cures. If it's a leading edge (appears to be so), make sure you have the tape covering the point of the trim so the wind won't try ...


3

The most convenient solutions are an electric engine block heater (as @mikes mentioned) or a petrol/diesel powered stationary heater. The latter is expensive, but generally more powerful than a block heater. Putting a space heater inside the car interior is possible, but has some drawbacks. Running an extension cord into the car is one: I'd recommend to ...


2

You could have a block heater installed. A block heater is a heating element that runs on household current. It is usually installed either in place of a freeze plug or in line of a large radiator hose. The power cord will then be run through the grill for access. The heater warms the coolant in the engine block and radiator. You could theoretically switch ...


2

While it is not imperative that it is completely flush together, it will make a difference. You will have a leak possibility there. This is the reason you replaced the weather stripping in the first place. What you need to do is stretch the weather stripping down on both sides so it will come together in the middle. If you start at dead center on the top ...


2

@Fred Wilson's comment is right on the money, high, positive long term fuel trims at idle that reduce at higher engine speeds indicate the presence of higher-than-normal unmetered air. The fact that it's unmetered indicates that you need to look for something after the MAF/MAP sensor. Things to check include: Unplugged/damaged hoses (e.g. EGR, PCV) ...


2

I have driven on steel wheels with no hub caps in the harsh Finnish road environment for about 6 years. I had hub caps on neither the winter wheels nor the summer wheels. No problems encountered. The reason for doing so was that I didn't want to remove and reinstall the hub caps two times per year at wheel changes. The car was of course inspected annually. ...


2

Personally i would be looking at epoxy resin, fibre-glass or similar. If the panel or body can be rotated or oriented so it is near flat it will make things easier. Epoxy has a number of advantages. It bonds well to many surfaces, and can be sanded and painted. Its less likely to crack than bondo/bog/filler and can be added in layers. Welding or ...


2

Ford has a parts resource web site that appears to have the parts and the references, but as so many things internet, some of the results are obscured by too much detail. It appears that you are seeking an apron or related front panel per a page on the above site. The best I can determine is that the part number is 16C274, but I can be incorrect about that....


1

Just to close this out...I discovered that someone bought and installed some type of "after market" stick on imitation chrome covers for door handles. So either one side fell off or they never did the other side. Grrrr. Thanks for the replies.


1

That could mean anything. It's a code intended for the folks who build the car, not so much as an indicator for the customer. My guess is the M represents a color code. The '1' for some other option that's not so obvious. (leather or vinyl trim? wood trim? cut outs in trim parts for optional switches, etc...) I'd guess that label is used by build folks ...


1

It is most likely a model name linked to the Suzuka circuit - there was probably a race that they won around the time or an anniversary of a race that they won.


1

From other cars I have worked on, you release the clips holding the panel on and pull it out to clear the button then slide it sideways off the handle.


1

I'd plug weld the hole then dress the weld and lead load it or add a light skim of P38. If a job is worth doing, it's worth doing well. All other methods tend not to last as holes that have been simply bridged and filled without welding tend to "drop out" and show through the paintwork after a few months.


1

So, if your car has the auxiliary heater, then you will have to remove that piece of plastic (?) 70 by 50 mm to clear pipes (probably). If you do not have that auxiliary heater, then the parts will fit with no other modification.


1

A tube heater (first hit on google) on the dashboard does a good job. You can either run a suitable extension through the door seal (I suggest the bottom in case of rain/snow/meltwater, and the driver's door so you don't forget about it). The tube shouldn't really touch the plastic of the dash, but in my Transit the end caps are the only points of contact ...


1

You're overthinking this. Just: start the car turn the heater on lock the car with the keyfob (engine and heater still running) go back inside your home and have a coffee for 20 minutes


1

It looks it is held by plastic rivets. You may be able to get them from dealer. Dealer can certainly help you with the information and if you don't ask them to fix, it shouldn't cost you anything.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible