10

Those are the limits. Going above specified torque can damage the thread in the nut or engine block, or on the bolt. Especially aluminum and light metals are prone to failure due to bolts and nuts that are fastened too tight. Going below the specified torque means that the bolt or nut is not fastened good enough. It may come loose and that can bring a lot of ...


10

Couple of notes on how to read this manual. A White wrench in a black square has the units N-m (kg-m, ft-lb) A Black wrench in a white square has the units N-m (kg-m, in-lb) So - the bolt very top left in your diagram should be tightened to 51 inch pounds (i.e, 4.25 ft-lbs - not very tight!). The nut on the left immediately below that bolt should be ...


9

Firstly.. If there is a gasket it should be replaced. If the studs etc are in very good condition then you could try undoing & re-torquing them. However due to the materials and heat cycles these parts go through the studs are often very tight or seized up. To repair this you'll have to be prepared to remove and clean up all the threads, or just buy ...


5

This means that the final torqued setting has to be done with the vehicle sitting on its wheels so the suspension is in the "normal" position. So this can be on the pavement or when on a ramp but the mass of the vehicle must be taken by the wheels. If you tighten the bolts/nuts with the suspension "hanging down" then the rubber bushes end up "stretched when ...


3

I would suggest that the difference is down to how the torque is applied to the pulley (I assume that is the part with the crank bolt you mention). Some pulleys have a taper fit and using a three-stage torquing regime allows things to settle between stages. If the full torque is applied in one hit then the taper may "lock" and give the appearance / feel of ...


3

@Steve Mathews you are correct : it is to with the stretch and yield of the material used in the bolts, a search on google gave this site amongst other explanations which, fortunately leaves out the maths used in stress calculations. https://user.xmission.com/~kd7olf/torque.html Do note the warning about NOT re-using that type of bolt.


3

Your torque wrench is not 100% accurate, so aiming for the limits may end up over or under-torquing it. Best to go for near the middle of the range. A modest torque wrench might be accurate to +/-4% of indicated value over a the stated range. So why the **** do they specify a range rather than simply give the nominal torque, you might well ask- the range ...


2

Here you go, "Tighten the nut to 30 N.m plus 120 degrees (22 lb ft plus 120 degrees). Inspect to ensure that 21/2-41/2 threads are visible above the nylon washer."


2

Reputable sources (e.g. Haynes, Chilton's, Alldata, etc) are paying a licensing fee to republish OEM information, or at the very least asking permission. Haynes is probably the only "paper" DIY repair manual source left, and typically they only publish information on older popular vehicles, where the income stream from the OEM manual is little or no ...


2

Judging from the ratios between the numbers, they are different units: Newton.meters (kilogram.meters, pound.feet) 1 Kg.m = 9.8 N.m and 1 lb.ft = 1.36 N.m From the diagram, I would think the cylindrical thing is a separate part, which is screwed into the cylinder head with a torque of 14.7 to make sure it is fully inserted into the head, and then the ...


2

If I understand your diatribe, you've torqued your wheel lugs and suspension bolts to the top end of what the manual stated you should torque them to. If this is what you did, quit worrying about it. You have done exactly what you needed to do for safe operation. Lug nuts will stand up to far in excess of what the rated torque in the book is given. You can ...


2

You seem to be asking, "I messed up but it is OK?" My answer is NO, this is not OK! You need to disassemble the engine and assess the damage. If the threads come out of the block, better now than after you've re-installed the engine in the vehicle. As a minimum your head bolts need to be replaced. It's possible you damaged the cylinder head ...


1

Pattern 1 is better as it is more side to side taking turns.


1

Things to look for: be sure surfaces between hub and rotor is clean. Be sure that the surfaces between rotor and wheel is clean. It is always recommended to recheck the lug nut torque after driving a short distance. If all the criteria above has been met, there is a possibility that the torque may need readjustment due to heating and cooling. Another ...


1

If there are doubts about the aftermarket publishers recycling figures, here is a late 70s Datsun factory service manual: and Haynes.. You can pretty much find every drawing in the Haynes book in the FSM. Re torque specs Haynes took the liberty of rounding ranges to a single number, eg 93-107 ft-lb in the FSM is 100 in the Haynes book. I did at a quick ...


1

None really as long as you have it sufficiently tight - if too loose it will vibrate looser and cause damage. Many bolts do have a torque specified but they just get tightened - lug or wheel nuts are correctly tightened to the torque specified in most cases now. Any shop that uses a buzz gun I would avoid... The drives shaft nut usually gets tightened to ...


1

High pressure hose is 37nm, return line is 28nm


1

This means that you tighten to 60Nm, then, you tighten a further 45 degrees, that is 1/8 of a turn. Edit: Nick C's comment is correct - I mis-read the post... Edit 2: The extra load provided by turning so many degrees is to "stretch" the bolt a given amount and that is how it can be specified. Some manufacturers give a torque setting, then a second torque ...


1

There are many methods of tightening threaded fasteners. The most common being torque control tightening. Torque specifications are determined by the fastener being used. After engineers determine the size and strength for the application, whether the fastener is dry or lubricated, they can calculate the torque specification. T = K x U x D x P T = torque ...


1

Here you go. Torque: Ft Lbs. 1) 25 2) 44 3) 66


1

110 Nm is the proper torque for the caliper the steering knuckle bolts.


1

Titanium M5 metric bolts have a torque specification of 25 inch pounds. Yes, you should use thread lock for all handlebar related bolts that are related to your safety as a rider. You can use the lowest level of thread lock.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible