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20

In a word: NO! Please do not use an impact wrench on these. You run the distinct chance of stripping out all of the threads in the head, which will cause a huge nightmare for you having to have threads replaced (Heli-coil or the like). Just use a socket/ratchet and you'll be fine.


5

It's called a double D or shock absorber socket


5

Use PB Blaster(the BEST),NOT WD-40(Water Displacement Formulation 40) or any brand of penetrating solvent,Liquid Wrench,etc. An impact wrench is a formula for disaster. Use a breaker bar to get the plug to move just a bit is good,apply more penetrant and,hard as it may to do so,WAIT. Days,even.If you can get the plug to move, even a bit counter-clockwise,re ...


4

The breaking point would be dependent on the size of the bolt, then significantly reduced due to the corrosion. I think there's a higher chance of snapping the bolt with a breaker bar anyway, compared to an impact driver as the driver only applies rotating force to the nut.


2

For larger fasteners, a bigger issue, when working on a rusty vehicle especially, is rounding the bolt heads/nuts with an impact gun. For smaller fasteners, breaking the bolt is probably more likely. If you are concerned with either scenario, break the fasteners loose with hand tools (either a small ratchet or a breaker bar, depending on the fastener) so ...


1

Yes they do. Annually at least, and the good ones are sold with calibration certificates from new.


1

The only thing I can think that your so-called mechanic is talking about being a Toyota-specific part is the Crankshaft Pulley Holding Tool which is OEM part# 09213-54015, it's not exactly some arcane unicorn baby tooth that is hard to get a hold of. It's applicable to a wide range of Toyota engines and is easily available from either Toyota themselves (see ...


1

MIG is much easier to learn than stick , especially for thin steel/low amperage. Gasless requires flux cored wire to get an adequate weld . The ductility and toughness are not as good for flux cored as gas but good enough for sheet metal. I suggest getting a unit that can use gas or that gas can be added on later.


1

For thin sheet aka car body panels I would go with the gasless mig (the wire produces its own gas via the flux it is treated with, so you have to get gasless mig wire which is more expensive...). I have used both and made many things with stick - even dung forks using old broken lorry halfshafts and 8" angle with 6mm rods to get the runs down faster. Would ...


1

Use the proper disconnect tool. You do not want to damage the line and have to replace it, or have it leak. Depending on where you buy it, sometimes the tools can be expensive especially in smaller parts stores. Amazon sells several fuel line disconnect tool kits for under $10.


1

Many tools are made to Fed Spec GGG-W-641E which you can still find on the internet as of July 2019. This spec gives test-torque requirements for 1/4, 3/8, 1/2, 3/4 and 1.0 inch drives for ratchets, universals, hinged breaker bars, extensions, etc.


1

I was fighting with a stuck rubber hose on my car when it just popped into my head that I had a heat gun in the trunk. I had loaned it out to my brother and he was just returned it to me. It was the kind of gun you would use to scrape paint. I tried it on the hose. I moved it around a lot and just tried to get it to soften the hose up. It worked great. ...


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