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Fortunately that damage is mostly cosmetic. That style of wheel, where the spokes run out to end flush at the very rim of the wheel is a pretty stiff geometry, so you're unlikely to have deformed the ledge and face that the tire seats on and seals against. Wheels where the lip is projected out from where the spokes attach are far more prone to bending with ...


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As the others said, the edge should be ground and the tire inspected closely for any cuts in the side-wall. But, one more thing: You should get your wheel re-balanced. When you hit the curb, your rims can get warped a little and if the wheel is not probably balanced, you can get an unpleasant wobble and wear out your wheel bearing much faster.


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Wheel looks OK, but that sharp edge should be ground down. If it were my car, I would try to get a small tool between the tire and the wheel and pull the very edge of the scraped area out just enough to get in there with a file and take the sharp edge off. If you don't have the tools, or don't feel comfortable with that, then take it to a shop that does ...


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You are probably fine, it doesn't look very deep however that is a bad place to get a scratch since it can affect tire integrity. For nothing else but peace of mind on your road trip you should probably get it repaired or replaced. That can probably buff out. Many tire shops can have you in and out in 15 minutes.


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Are you planning on taking your car to a race track? If we are talking about tires and handling, the order of importance is generally as follows: Tire compound Tire width Tire construction (e.g. sidewall stiffness) Wheel width This is why race cars (real ones you see on TV) use tires that are worn out after 40 minutes of driving. They have extremely soft ...


1

Some research over at https://www.hubcaphaven.com/p/8892/aly59444-bmw-x5-wheel-silver-painted-36116761929.html show that these wheels (based on the partnumber 6761929) have an offset of 40mm. Given that '40' appears in the information given, I'd be pretty solid with that number.


1

Short version: try it and see. Long version: The 15" tires are 2.6% larger in overall diameter than the 16" tires. This will make your speedometer read 2.6% too high and effectively reduce acceleration of the vehicle by 2.6%. At 2.6% this is not really an issue for most people, e.g. when the speedometer indicates 70 mph you are really going 72 mph - not a ...


4

The vast majority of air compressors sold in the UK are mains powered - in fact when I was looking a year or so ago I couldn't find any affordable petrol powered ones (my garage doesn't have mains electricity) - I ended up buying battery tools instead.


2

Continental say 5/32" or 4mm- https://www.continental-tires.com/car/tire-knowledge/tire-care-maintenance/tread-depth Some winter and all-season tyres come with an extra set of wear bars set at 5/32" or 4mm for when they're considered unsafe for snow use but they're probably still good for snow/ice-free roads right down to the normal wear bars. On snow/ice-...


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If the tires look OK, they are probably fine. Issues to check for: cracks in tread and sidewall bubbles in tread and sidewall even wear cuts, embedded foreign objects Storage conditions make a big difference. Storing tires in dark plastic bags away from sun light and ozone sources makes them last longer. Tires not mounted on a vehicle last longer. There ...


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It's perfectly normal for a motorcycle front tire to be worn on one side more than the other. The explanation is simple, you travel a much greater distance when you turn LEFT in places where vehicles drive on the RIGHT or vice versa depending on which side of the road you normally drive on. Here is a link to an explanation: Tire Wear Explanation Scroll ...


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All examples are considering vehicle is traveling forwards. First I'll start with a front-wheel drive vehicle. Upon any acceleration/ torque the front tires try to toe in. This is a natural force, but since there are so many moving steering/suspension parts on the front, some "play" has to exist. When these cars were first coming on the scene, manufacturers ...


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The wheel is done, so you're better off just buying a spare. You can buy matching OEM wheels online from a variety of web sites, and also through interchange amongst full-service scrap yards. The wheel is made of aluminum and steel, and recycles nicely. Let the tire shop do it. If the tire is undamaged just have a tire shop transfer it to the new wheel. ...


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Yes, you should drive slowly, (not on the highway) and with the hazard lights on to the nearest wheel and tire shop and replace it. Just kidding, you'd be safer putting a spare on, but if it holds air you could drive on it in an emergency. Driving that at speed would be extremely dangerous due to increased risk of a blowout, which could send you into a ...


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Do NOT drive this at all. Change the wheel before driving it again. That can cause sudden loss of control if the bead shifts.


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Well i am not sure this should be answered but in compliance with the site rules, DON'T. Also if i may ask back isn't your tire deflated?


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