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1

I hate to say it but that doesn't look great - it looks to have taken pretty deep chunk of the sidewall out, and there's what appears to be a deeper split as well. You really don't want to try repairing that with rubber cement - that will have completely different elasticity to the actual rubber of the tire and I could see unpleasant things happening as the ...


2

I believe your theory on the battery dying and then rebounding is one possibility and it's not uncommon for a nearly end-of-life battery or the unit it is powering to exhibit unpredictable behavior. The other possibility that comes to my mind is an intermittent connection, either to the battery or some other component in the sensor. In either case your ...


0

Get into your car and drive to a tire store and replace the tire. The side wall is the thinnest part of the tire and that's exactly where your cuts are. I'd even be thinking about putting on your spare and not even driving on the cut tire... it's just not worth taking the chances of getting a blowout.


0

it may be holding air ok but it could fail at any time , if it was on my car I'd be replacing it


0

Try it and see. The most important factor is rim size. The reason is that the wheel must fit over the brake caliper. Take out your tape measure and then measure overall height and width. If it mounts, clears the brakes, and is close in size you are fine.


1

Sorry to say that tire's a write-off - the upper damage is to the structural part of the side wall and you can see what looks like one of the metal bands through the hole. Honestly I'm surprised/impressed that it's remained inflated. This is definitely not something that can wait - if you've got a spare I'd be swapping to that and getting a new tire ASAP, ...


3

Yes you do. You need to get this fixed now - it is very unsafe. You have a split in the side wall, which is serious - there are a lot of stresses there. In the UK that would fail. I'm concerned about your wheel as well - I'd get it checked when you go in for a new tire.


-1

Thanks for your suggestions, I had the tire replaced a few days ago, it wasn’t fun, but I did what I had to do.


13

I can tell you that in the UK, it would fail an MOT inspection. Specifically; 5.2.3 (d) (ii) "A tyre with a lump, bulge or tear caused by separation or partial failure of its structure" Given that it would fail a UK MOT, I'd personally advise that in my view it is not safe to drive on.


13

That needs changing NOW It is not safe even though it may not be loosing air it could fail at any mment...


6

This is a supplement to Zipzit's answer. Added as an answer due to the image. As Zipzit said - the photo is deceptive. That appears to be a NEXEN NPRIZ AH8 tyre. If so, the object appears to be at about the location shown, so well off the tread proper, as zipzit says. Larger version of image here Image from here and many other locations. ...


3

As a tech i would replace that and knowing that brand of tire would advise you they provide warranties for exactly this situation the brand of tire offers a 1 year or 2/32 tread warranty chexk with your local retailer


0

I am a tire technition and honestly in most cases if it's in the belts and it's a small hole from like a nail or screw like in that picture it can be repaired with just a patch, however most places have the plug and patch all in one and those require drilling the hole bigger to make it fit, in that case it damages more belts and can cause the tire to blow ...


1

That's pretty close to the sidewall..it only about 1-1.5 cm in..no where near enough to clear the chord band really ..yes you could repair it but ..its not the holding air that's the problem it's the structural nature of the sidewall that makes repair difficult..


0

that might be too near the side wall but i have used kits like this before with good results https://www.summitracing.com/parts/amk-1034-a/


7

As the 'guy' who fixes it, the long and short of it is that I would NOT repair that. It's not a financially-driven decision, it's safety. The steel chords are the strongest part. You would be drilling them and in turn opening up to sidewall failure. I would be prepared to replace it, but it might be repaired as a personal favour (still NOT recommended). But ...


39

That one looks too close to the sidewall. Bring $$ and replace. Reference Here Apparently that tire repair guidance originates from the guidelines set by the USTMA (U.S. Tire Manufacturer Assoc.) Now obviously that reference is designed to help sell tires, but its pretty safe, sound guidance.


1

The ABS system doesn't care about tire size. The biggest concern when going to a different size is fender clearance especially loaded and while turning. As long as the replacement tire is reasonably similar in size, you shouldn't have any problems. Is there a club or owner's group for this type of car? Others there may have some specific size ...


0

Depending on the car, if you only switch on 1 axle then it could confuse the ABS system, which would detect different speeds front and back. On some vehicles with 4wd it could cause major issues with the central differential.


3

Here is a good resource for tire sizing: Tire Size Calculator The larger 225/65 tires are only larger by 0.9" diameter which means less then 0.5" of reduced clearance. (The radius of the tire is 0.45" larger than the smaller one.) Unless the clearance on your Odyssey is unusually small, there should be no problem fitting these tires to your car. The ...


0

I would not stack 2X4 higher than 3 pieces ; they are not stable enough for any side force. I have screwed 3 pieces together for stability . Brick and cinder block are too brittle . I have cracked both. I recommend thicker wood or jack stands. I found some short lengths of 8X8 wood that work well ( 2 piece stack, max). Also additional jacks like hydraulic, ...


2

Do not use make shift jackstands such as 2x4's, concreteblocks etc. It is extremely unsafe. Trying to use two scissor jacks on diagonal corners of the body is also unsafe. The car can fall onto the unsupported corner. A service manual (not to be confused with the owners manual) will show jacking and support points. This involves using either a suspension ...


2

From here European metric, also called metric, is similar. No letter "P" is used as a prefix. The three-digit number at the beginning indicates cross section in millimeters. If the aspect ratio is lower than 82, the aspect ratio number will follow the section width number. If not, then no aspect ratio number will appear. So it will have an 82% aspect ...


2

You can do the whole thing with one jack and no axle stands. Just rotate each wheel using the spare wheel, temporarily. No need to torque up the spare wheel nuts, it's not staying on. Spare to front, front to back, back to front. Same thing with the other pair to swap. Then put away the spare wheel.


2

Please check YOUR tires for any differing details but Continental says this at: Continental Tire Customer Help In cases where the tires will be supporting the vehicle, it is permissible to inflate the tires to the maximum pressure listed on the sidewall. Be sure to return the inflation pressure to recommended usage pressure before operating the vehicle. ...


1

I have 205/55 R 16 tires on my Hyundai I30 and have a set of five wheels for same which will take 195/65 R 15 tires. The outside diameter of the wheels/tires are exactly the same, as the spare will still fit snugly in its place. Besides, the 195/65 tires are much cheaper and a smoother ride.


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