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58

There is no theoretical reason why you couldn't use a bicycle pump to fill car tyres. Indeed I used a double barrel foot pump to pump the tyres on my wifes' bicycle last night that I usually use for car tyres. What you have to consider though is that the volume of air in a car tyre is significantly more than that of a push bike. It's not that the pumping ...


44

People do that. Sometimes, at least. I have a high quality (high volume) bike pump at home, and occasionally I use it to check the pressure on the car, or to top off if it's obviously missing something. I find it 100% hassle free and not in the least problematic. But then I have a really good volume on that pump; also I can use my whole body to pump (the ...


13

Huh? I totally do this. I’ve had tires with slow leaks, around 10 psi each month. You’d be surprised how effective a bicycle pump is. 50 pumps is equal to around 5 psi for the tires on my Mazda 3. Learn how to use your legs when you pump. That’s way more efficient. I’ve found its easier and quicker to use the bicycle pump then it is to move the car into ...


13

This is absolutely normal. What's going on is they are seating the beads of the tire against the rims. In order to get them to do this, they have to over pressurize the tires a bit, which then allows the beads to pop over the sides and seat hard against the rims. This ensures they are in position correctly on the rim and promotes sealing after the fact.


7

The conflicting advice is confusing to sort out, because the logic seems to have got the cause-and-effect connections wrong. So let's start again... The tires are the only part of the vehicle that is in contact with the road, and that contact has to support the weight of the vehicle. The maths behind that are simple: weight supported by a wheel = (...


6

Expect to be told that damage that severe is not able to be safely repaired. It's not able to be unsafely repaired either. It's time for a replacement tire. Sidewall damage, unless cosmetic, is always fatal. You may find a couple of posts here for small gouges in the heavier portion of the rubber. The key for those is "small" and "gouges," not rather large ...


6

Oil life indicators try to predict the degradation of the oil using a combination of engine run time, driving distance, number of cold engine starts and similar data. It does not actually check the quality of the oil. On the 2014 Accord, the maintenance monitor keeps track of other maintenance as well, but they cannot be reset individually (except at a ...


5

For the product to provide long-term preventive sealing, it needs to remain in a fluid state. Driving a car on the highway with a tire full of liquid is dangerous. Fix-a-flat style repairs are intended for emergency use only, just to get the car to a place where a real repair can be done, and usually are intended to solidify, not stay liquid. You're ...


4

Usually in the driver's side door jam there's a sticker which looks something like this: It gives you what the tire pressure should be and load ratings for your vehicle (usually). If it isn't in the driver's door jam, look around at the other door jams. It should be there somewhere.


4

Basically two reasons : the material is designed to support the temperatures in normal use (excessive temperatures can be caused by low pressure and subsequent failure) and the tyre also radiates heat to the atmosphere / surroundings - you can feel the heat being radiated from warm tyres if you put your hand close after a fair distance. It is possible to ...


4

This advice/information comparing car and bicycle tires and their tendency to hydroplane by Sheldon Brown maybe helpful. My takeaway from reading this is: If you have a "car like" tire with a wide contact patch that can trap water tread and contact area can help with wet weather traction, If you have a "bike like" tire with an essentially round cross ...


4

Well, there's a few things going on here: your tire pressure monitoring system is saying the pressures are OK (first line at the top) the units for these numbers are kiloPascals (kPa, right next to your front-right tire pressure) ideally, tire pressures should be even, but we don't live in an ideal world. The variation you have isn't huge. if you prefer PSI ...


4

I think the terms you're using - over-inflate and under-inflate - aren't the best descriptors. There's a maximum tire pressure, around 50 psi for many tires. Inflating past that PSI would be over-inflating - but I don't think that's what you mean by over-inflating. I think you mean, inflating them past what most people inflate them to - around 30 or 35 PSI....


4

If a shop says we can fix it - leave - that damage has affected the plies used in the construction of the sidewall and it will fail even if they can get it to hold air. I had a sharp stone do this to a new winter tyre.... Replacement - ah well its only money - but the only thing to do.


4

Vehicle manufacturers quote recommended pressures with the tire cold (meaning: not immediately after driving) and at "typical" atmospheric conditions. Essentially, they're quoting the pressure at room temperature (20 degrees C) and typical humidity. Air pressure will vary naturally with temperature. The relationship is roughly 5% per 10 degrees C. If you ...


3

I had this same question, and while I mostly agree with alephzero's answer, I wanted to provide a way to actually account for the increase in tongue weight (the trailer's load on the vehicle). Let's say we have a 5,000lb vehicle where the owner's manual recommends 35 PSI for normal operation. Based on that alone, 5,000 (pounds) / 35 (pounds/ square inch) = ...


3

Because "cold" pressures are much more likely to be consistent then "warm" pressures and barring things like one side of the car having been in hot sun for a few hours should be pretty evenly "cold" all round as well. Driving a mile or two to the garage to check pressures and inflate them is unlikely to have a significant impact on tire temperature so is ...


3

The air pressure in tires are affected by temperature, which is why one measures and adds air when the tires are cold, undriven. When inflated, the shape of the tire will change slightly, as it expands. I'm sure many have seen a very low tire lift from the ground as the proper pressure is reached. The contact patch of the tire to the ground is directly ...


3

The tire shop should be able to give you the definitive word, but I'd not have an issue patching it and putting it back out on the road. As long as you don't see any dry rot occurring (cracks along the super flexed portions of where the flat is at) you really shouldn't have anything to worry about especially seeing as how it hasn't been driven on. A couple ...


3

The ABS and traction will detect that the rotational velocity on all tires do not match the expected. A low tire changes the effective radius of the tire, and therefore the rotational velocity will be different in the wheel with the low tire. That is why you got the indicator.


3

Yes you can, but as several answers here point out, the difference in volume between a bike and car tire make it less practical. If you have changed a tire on a bike you know it has an inner tube that holds the air. Even if there is a small hole in the tube, you can fill the bike tire. Most car tires today do not have tube. On more than one occasion I ...


3

There is a law in physics, the ideal gas law: pV = nRT. Here, p is the pressure, V is the volume, n is the amount of ideal gas in moles, R is the ideal gas constant and T is the temperature. However, to apply this law, you need to use the absolute temperature (or any quantity proportional to it), i.e. Kelvins, not a temperature that can be either positive ...


3

Please correct the tire pressure as soon as you can. They likely couldn't be bothered to look up the correct values for your car and chose to use reasonable "default" ones. It still is safe to drive like this, but there'll be a bit more wear on the rear tires, and the front may feel less stable. After having driven a few miles, you should make sure the ...


3

Without your foot on brake, press the power button to turn on accessories. On the instrument cluster push the button several times until oil life is displayed. With oil life displayed hold the button in until it starts blinking. Let off the button and then hold the button in again until it resets. Your mechanic probably just forgot to reset it.


2

The elegantly simple answer is; if they did, we wouldn't use them. If they designed a tyre that set itself on fire, they wouldn't pass type approval and they wouldn't allow them to be sold. The rubber compounds used within the tyre are chemically engineered to prevent this from ever happening. I have once seen a tyre catch on fire. It wasn't the actual ...


2

TL;DR: Essentially, TPMS service is replacing the wheel units on a vehicle with dTMPS where the units have either failed or where the battery is low enough that it will likely run out before the next time the tires would need to be demounted. For cars without TMPS or cars with iTMPS the service is unnecessary. If it is being offered "blindly" (without ...


2

Follow the manufacturer's specs. They know what is required for the vehicle and is what you should be using. There should not be much wear difference front to rear due to this. If you rotate your tires (front to rear - as long as you can rotate your tires - ie: different sizes front to rear), this will combat any wear differences because of this. You have ...


2

Nothing of "proof", but you need to keep them at normal operating pressure before you load the vehicle. You don't want them under-inflated, as while when you put a load on them and the pressure will increase doing so, this doesn't do anything to support the sidewalls. This has to do with volume, not pressure. When the sidewalls are squished (lower than ...


2

Your bicycle air pump is designed to provide high pressure air, relatively speaking to a low volume container, the bicycle tire. If you have a high performance tire, it will be even higher pressure than 60 psi and a lower volume. My previous tires were 120 psi but only 7/8" wide, a very small volume. Today's fat-tire bikes will have lower pressures and much ...


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