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It's possible but extremely unlikely that the timing belt is the culprit to a power loss. The timing belt (or chain in some cases) synchronizes the movement of the pistons and valves in the engine. Most modern internal combustion engines are interference engines, meaning the piston at top dead center will hit any open valves, so a failure of the timing chain ...


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No, your way is not the correct way of doing this. It's very simple. Once the belt is installed, rotate the engine in the proper rotation (most are clockwise) from the crankshaft for two turns. This puts all the slack on the tensioner side. This also gives you another chance to double check the timing without the engine going crunch. The very best way to ...


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Initially any slackness in the belt will be spread between all of the pulleys. By tensioning it, then cranking by hand, you are moving all of the slack to the location of the tensioner. The tensioner can then be adjusted correctly. Edit - You will appreciate that there is a lot of friction associated with each of the pulleys that the belt travels around. ...


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The new position looks like it is more correct than the old position, which looked too far back. Looking at the location of the tensioner, wear would likely cause the tensioner pulley to tilt up at the front, which could cause the belt to move back on the pulleys. Was there much play in the old tensioner?


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Not that what Solar Mike is saying is wrong, but to add to his post ... There's three problems with what you're suggesting: Some companies DO put the walk blocker on the camshaft pulley. Look at the Honda J35 V6 (goes for the other J3x series v6 engines as well) for instance: The rear cam has the walk blocker on it. This isn't a one off either. More than ...


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So after a lot of inspection and diagnosing. I sensed that one of the cylinders isn't firing correctly (engine vibrates, uneven). By disconnecting injectors I found out that the cylinder in question is #3 (disconnecting the injector doesn't make any difference). So I swapped injectors with cylinder 2 and now cylinder 2 isn't firing. It was a bad injector ...


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TL DR: The locking pins are an aid to keep things in place and not meant for precision. While you'd think it'd need to be exact, it really doesn't need to be. It just has to be exact enough so when you put the belt onto the cogs, everything lines up. If you look at one of the teeth in the belt, they probably (at a guess and depending on which motor) ...


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First step is to get number 1 piston at TDC. Once you have done that then you can engage the camshaft gear with the crank gear using that mark and looking at the camshaft so that you have it in the correct position or at least close to ie where both valves are closed. Sometimes you need to turn the camshaft so that as the gear teeth engage the cam gets ...


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The angle isn't as important as you think. The main thing is, when you are on your first tightening sequence, certain valves will be completely closed (your "sequence of valves"). After you turn the crank 240°, you'll do the rest of the valves. These valves need to be closed. On any engine I've dealt with, there's a pretty broad swath of crankshaft ...


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The timing affects the point of ignition of the fuel charge during the compression phase as it is usually before TDC. This point is advanced as the engine speed increases as the fuel charge takes a finite amount of time to ignite and then burn. If the point of ignition is too late some of the fuel charge leaves the combustion chamber still burning. The point ...


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Lets sum it up: You used the right parts. The pulleys are synced. The tension is correct. All the bolts are tightened. The belts rests at the correct position onto the pulley. You checked the alignment of the tensioner pulley. After several revolutions of the crankshaft by hand the points above are still correct. If all the points above are matched, then I'...


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Because it can, or does, make fitting belts more difficult. A walk blocker won't affect tension. And belts only tend to come off the pulleys for two reasons (imhe) a bearing has failed and the pulley sits at an angle or the belt is delaminating.


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