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13

I think the main reason for this is convenience. It's an easy place to run the water pump. If you ran it out to a fan belt, it would be in the way of the timing belt while doing it, or it would be a really awkward mess trying to work around it. The second reason is for compactness. With the water pump stuck out of the way, it physically makes the engine ...


11

I don't know if I deserve all this credit. My idea was sound, but my measurements were pretty bad so my numbers are way off. If you try this, use the more precise software that Robert S. Barnes ended up using and don't rely on a YouTube video to measure a belt spinning at 200 RPM! In your first video, the timing belt is going through 1 revolution per ...


10

Engine safety. If you lose an accessory belt driven water pump, you're likely to keep driving, thinking the "oh, I just don't have an alternator" while you're busy cooking your engine beyond repair (normally with no temperature notification/change, if anything it'll read cold). When the water pump is on with the timing belt (or geared to crankshaft as is ...


9

Diesel engine timing is accomplished through the fuel injectors (they inject fuel at the proper times). Proper timing prevents pre-ignition because there's no fuel in the cylinder yet to ignite. Glow plugs and/or well-designed high pressure injectors ensure the diesel is in a suitable state for combustion and prevent delayed ignition. If the engine is warm ...


7

In the dawn of fuel injection most cars used a simultaneous double fire system. During every crank shaft revolution the injectors spray half the fuel needed. This way half the fuel waits on top of the intake valve. When the intake valve opens the first half is dumped in and the injector sprays in the other half the fuel. Similar thing happens with the spark....


7

Referring to this website: If all is well and there is no slack in the timing chain then you will see about three to five degrees of "reverse motion" before the distributor begins to turn. To measure this, do the following: Get a socket which fits the front balancer crank shaft bolt. Get a breaker bar which is long enough to turn the crank using it. ...


6

The OP indicated in their comment that they didn't maintain timing in the process of replacing the timing belt. Since the 2007 Accord V6 has an interference engine, attempting to crank the engine over with the timing off will result in mechanical damage, which would explain why it is running roughly.


6

On the Honda SOHC V6 engine when doing timing the mark on the crank sprocket should line up with a small arrow on the block @ 12 o'clock. The bank 2 cam gear should have the cylinder 1 TDC mark lining up with the indent on the backing plate. The bank 1 cam gear is pretty much the same as bank 2. It has an indent and a mark on the cam gear. A good practice ...


6

You need Spark, Fuel, and Compression for an engine to run. Since this engine was just reassembled, there is a lot to question. Spark - rotor position - beware of caps where the points are not "straight through" plug wires in the correct position timing - may need play with it a bit coil - ensure it is firing spark plug firing - use a jumper to connect ...


5

While the vehicles are equipped with a distributor the innards of that distributor have changed quite a bit. The distributor no longer contains flyweights or any mechanical timing controls, instead it contains the camshaft position sensor. The way the system works is, readings are taken from the crankshaft position sensor by the PCM. The PCM then ...


5

quick tip if any one is doing their timing chain or belt. make sure you have a picture showing the tdc( top dead center), double check all the marks match exactly no error is tolerated here, the crank, exhaust cams, intake cams etc. the tip is first throw the belt on the crank, then align the belt on the cam which ever is far away from the tensioner, then ...


5

Variable valve timing permits an increase in the torque in the lower engine speed ranges and increased engine power in the higher engine speed range. Basically, the system alters the relative position of the inlet camshaft with respect to the exhaust camshaft corresponding to the engine operating conditions. The idea is to control how long "valve overlap" ...


5

First, remember that we are talking about four different engine cycles here: Intake; Compression; Ignition/Combustion; Exhaust. Top dead center (TDC) happens between two of these cycles: between Compression and Combustion, then again between Exhaust and Intake. The reason the piston and valve do not come into contact is because either the piston is following ...


5

Pinging is caused by one of several different reasons. It is usually a hot spot in the combustion chamber which is causing the issue. A hot spot is usually made of carbon buildup, the edges of which get hot very easily, will glow red as such, and will ignite the air/fuel mixture. If a hot spot is present, it will pre-ignite the air/fuel mixture during ...


4

Rotate the engine so the timing hashes on the VMS cam gear are straight up. Ensure piston #1 is at TDC by checking on the timing mark on the crank pulley is lined up with the mark on the timing cover. There are four marks on the timing cover. Use the one to the right (by itself): It should look like this when aligned: Now go back to your timing gear. First,...


4

Before installing the timing belt, I'd worry about engine damage The 2004 Sienna came with two engines: a 3.3 L V6 (code 3MZ-FE), which comes with a timing belt a 3.5 L V6 (code 3GR-FE), which utilizes a timing chain Both of these engines are interference engines, so the pistons and valves will occupy the same physical space at different times while the ...


4

Excellent question, at present both pistons (1 and 6) are at Top Dead Centre. You will probably have noted this from the zero timing mark on the harmonic balancer (I assume this is fitted!). Mate, you need to drop the pushrods into location for 1 and 6. Then move the crankshaft bolt backwards and forwards through about 20 degrees with a breaker bar and ...


4

If the tensioner has broken in two you'll need to replace it I'm afraid. They aren't mega bucks for those and bodging it back together is just putting a timebomb in place IMHO.


4

I don't like those "preprinted" marks anyway. You are much better off following the sprocket alignment pictures below. After the belt is installed and the tensioner properly set, crank the engine over BY HAND (in the running direction) at least four full revolutions, and check that all marks come back to perfect alignment. I've done dozens of these, and ...


3

Historically the water pump was at the front of the engine in close proximity to the vehicle radiator, when vehicles were mostly rear wheel drive. There is no real advantage with todays vehicles but they continue to be at the front of the engine. Using the timing belt to drive the water pump lends itself to compactness at the front end of the engine. Some ...


3

i-VTEC changes HOW MUCH the intake and exhaust valves can open. VVT changes WHEN the intake and exhaust ports open. It's a lot of information to put in an answer. The short version is that by electronically changing exactly when the intake and exhaust valves open and close, you can increase the volumetric efficiency of the engine across a large RPM range. ...


3

All the important pulleys (the crank, the camshaft(s) and anything else that is vital) will have alignment marks that you can use to align them - usually an indent on the pulley and a matching mark on the end of the block/head. Key things to remember: The parts are all designed to rotate together, so ideally you need to turn them all at the same time. As ...


3

Question 1: This depends on engine design. In an interference engine, the valves can collide with the pistons, so you need to design the timing diagram to prevent that. In non-interference engines, there is sufficient room in the combustion chamber that the valves will never collide with the piston. Question 2: As @Paulster2 says, we're talking about a ...


3

I think the biggest issue that your are potentially having is the aftermarket cam sprocket. The stock sprocket has an UP mark with to horizontal markers that you align to the valve cover surface. Hope this helps, best of luck.


3

Yes, that should fit O'Reilly's compatibility chart for the Gates TCK304 shows your vehicle under the compatible vehicles. In addition, Amazon's compatibility seems to say the same thing. Are you sure that you have a 2000cc (2.0L) engine? The only match I see is the 2.5L for that year and trim. Edit: it turns out that there is a 2.0L version of this ...


3

When you check the timing previously, you may have noticed the marks being slightly off because some belt stretch. Install the new belt according to the manual (even with the head is very common) for proper valve timing.


3

well you either have bad bearings in your tensioner or a really fast telegraph operator in there. Change out that tensioner and its springs which is what should almost always be done when changing belts. the skinny is there are certain things to toss money at and certain things not to. timing belts and associated parts are not something to skimp on. If ...


3

This is a bit of a shot in the dark, but I'm going to point my finger at the tensioner spring. To me, the sound in the video is very... dull. Kind of thudy for lack of a better term. It sound like one of the pulleys is not having the teeth align quite right which is causing the belt teeth to slap into the groove. The thing is that the belt can appear ...


3

With a no-run scenario, think FASTEC: Fuel You've confirmed delivery, but the resultant mixture could be too rich or too lean for the engine to run Air Ditto on the reason: air-fuel ratios matter. Broken/disconnected hoses, sticky throttle bodies, the engine drawing in air from unexpected locations... Spark Confirmed, shouldn't be an issue here. Timing ...


3

When you shut off the car the cams can rotate counterclockwise due to spring tension. This compresses the tensioner and if there's too much play in the chain it jumps timing. When you installed the chain, there should be three color marks on the chain that correspond to a mark on each gear. On the cam gears there are diamond marks, on the crank it's just a ...


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