10

Before jumping to conclusions, you could take the rocker cover off and see whether the chain is still connected. The fact that you were able to turn the engine over for a while quickly without it jamming may suggest that the chain snapped. The valve gear may be in a safe position and it could possibly just be the chain that is now jammed.


10

Here are a few factors besides the ones already mentioned that don't work in the favor of chains: chains need lubrication. Do we really want another grease/oil in the engine bay? pulleys would have to be replaced with sprockets. If some debris finds its way in the engine bay and lodges itself in a sprocket you can look forward to broken teeth in case ...


8

Noise and Cost. It's really that simple. Chains used to be the most common device used for connecting the timing gears. Somewhere across the way someone told the consumer that cars shouldn't make noise and so the cheaper and less reliable belt was used by the manufactures. They did the same with direct drive (gear to gear) when they went to a fiber gear ...


7

For a four-stroke engine you need to rotate 2 turns of the crankshaft to get to the same position.


6

I think you need to reseal the timing cover I found several images uploaded in a ZIP by an enterprising Corolla owner. Here's an image showing the O-ring you replaced next to the water pump/pulley assembly. If that was leaking you would see water dribbling down the front of the timing chain cover. Here is another image showing how the gasket maker/sealant ...


6

IIRC on the 2.3 there is no keyway to keep the crank gear and balancer aligned. If the engine is spinning and has compression you probably spun the balancer and it's out of time. Set piston 1 at TDC and line the balancer up as indicated. I think this is an M6x1.0 bolt. This should be 20 teeth off the blank space on the balancer. Here's an example using ...


5

I won't say the timing chain will never break, but they are designed to last for the life of the engine (this applies to most vehicles with a timing chain, not just the Honda ... there are some which had issues, though, Honda not being one of them). Your car, having ~288k miles on it is no spring chicken. I'd expect your engine will have other issues before ...


5

I don't see how the timing chain could have jumped or broken in this situation. If the wrench was on the crank pully, and this is what stopped the engine, there was little to no force on the timing chain because there's little resistance on the cams. I'm guessing you probably damaged your starter gear or broke some teeth off of the flywheel, so the faster ...


4

In my experience, you get at least one or two teeth out before the engine is physically damaged. However, I would suggest you look into whether or not your engine should be temporarily fitted with a cam locking tool during timing belt replacement. I'd also strongly advocate turning the engine over by hand prior to attempting to start it so you know for ...


4

From what I have read, the Zetec engines of this period using a timing belt. The image attached shows what looks to be pretty much identical to your engine but with the plastic timing gear cover removed and it's clearly a belt. You can prise the cover back slightly and peer in with a torch to confirm yourself but if there is a chain under that plastic ...


4

If your mechanic says 'Timing chains are for life and require no maintenance' then please find a new mechanic. There are loads of examples of timing chains that are designed for life but suffer from early failure of some sort whether its stretching, snapping, a tensioner or guide failing or anything else. Examples include: BMW N47 2.0D - Probably the most ...


3

The parts that go on timing chain systems are not typically the actual chain but the guides and tensioners. The consequence of failure is the same, although you might get a little warning as it may start to rattle as it loosens up.


3

I would use wire (welding rod is a good candidate) or small springs to "hook" the chain either side - obviously the top part stays loose but the bottom part around the lower sprocket stays firmly in place.


3

Based on what you've said, that is a hard question to answer – but my best guess is no. The coincidence of the collision and the rattle suggests that the noise has another source, it is unlikely that the collision would have caused a problem with the timing chain. Your first step should be to do a bit of research. For peace of mind, I'd recommend that you ...


3

The good news is that everything happened at low speed, because you never actually got the engine running. So whatever the damage is, it will probably be fairly limited. The bad news is that with this sort of problem, you don't know what you are going to find until you take the head off at a minimum, and just doing that isn't cheap even if there you find ...


2

Have you pulled codes from the ECM? Apparently the codes p1340/17748 are associated with timing chain problems. That might help you verify the diagnosis. Timing chain failures are rarer than belt failures, but they are just as catastrophic. A timing chain failure can cause enough damage to effectively total the car. You definitely want to attend to this, ...


2

If the chain jumped or broke while turning the engine with the starter, what could happen (if you are unlucky) is that a piston hits and bends some valve. The piston would probably survive. If so, it would not be quite as expensive to fix as you have been told.


2

Well I don't know if this applies to all motorcycles but my GSX-R 600 K7 manual says that you need to change the cam chain: When the distance between some pins of the chain is out of tolerance. When the tensioner reaches the end and cannot stretch out any further. When the chain is broken. When some other visible damage is noticeable. When you replace the ...


2

given the word "interference" then I would assume that there is little or no room for error on the timing. Interference for engines tends to mean that the valves occupy the same space as the pistons at different times moving out the way as the other arrives. The springs closing the valves can cause the cam to rotate away from the timing point, so there is ...


2

First, verify the vacuum gauge and the port you are connecting to. 5in is very low vacuum and I suspect the car would idle like crap. Vacuum is produced by the engine efficiently trying to pump air and the carburetor choking it off. Engine condition (piston, rings, heads), timing chain (advanced/retarded) affect how much vacuum it produces. Ignition ...


2

I would recommend taking a link off the chain and using a master link (pictured below). This is typically a link with a removable plate and is commonly used to reconnect chains that have been broken. Make sure you get the correct size for the chain you have. An extra advantage of this approach is if you need to remove the chain again, you only need to remove ...


2

Mitchell shows 12.3 hours for the timing set and an additional 1.6 hours to R&R the cams on both banks. Probably add a half hour to R&R the vct solenoids. The actuators are figured into the 12.3 figure.


2

I assume that you are talking about a four-stroke cycle, so if you rotate 360 degrees then the engine will be at TDC changing from the exhaust to the inlet stroke which is not TDC for the combustion stroke. If the cam is not connected and you are setting up the timing from scratch then TDC is TDC. Once the cams are in the correct position and connected by ...


1

The owner's manual for 2013 Mazda3 specifies two different maintenance schedules: Schedule "A" for normal use Schedule "B" for severe use Schedule A, normal use, calls for the drive belts every 37,500 mi / 60,000 km. See page 8-5 in the manual. Schedule B, severe use, calls for the drive belts every 35,000 mi / 56,000 km. See page 8-7 in the manual. ...


1

Alldata says 10.8 for the cams (but all four), and figure another 2.5 for the timing chain and guides/tensioners. I doubt you need VCT solenoids, but the actuators won't add much (maybe an hour) if you are already replacing cams. So Ben's answer totals about 14.4, my estimate (Alldata) suggests around 14.3 maybe an hour or more less if the exhaust cams ...


1

Generally speaking, it depends how much the chain skipped. Some engines have more tolerance than others. Reset the timing chain to the proper time and it should be safe to run a compression test.


1

The Peugeot HDI engine has a cambelt and usually takes around 3hours to do a cam belt and water pump. The water pump is driven of the cam belt and I would always replace the water pump at this millage at the same time as the belt for two reasons; it only takes a extra few minutes as you have to remove the cam belt to get to the pump and costs very little so ...


1

My understanding looking at this Wikipedia page is the B47 didn't show up in the BMW 320d until 2015. It is true the N47 (the B47 predecessor) had timing chain issues, but the was fixed/mitigated early on (it also depends on who you listen to or what you read on the internet). After the mitigation, there were far fewer engine failures due to it, but the N47 ...


1

Had the same problem, Coolant going everywhere. changed the plastic thermostat neck, changed the water pump. Still coolant going everywhere. Took the timing chain cover off to reseal and discovered that the chamber inside the motor mount that is bolted thru the timing chain cover has a hole in the top for ventilation I guess. Well over the years it sealed ...


1

Your cam chain has reached the end of it's service life Your cam chain is stretched beyond service limits it appears. If you have no more adjustment available to push your cam chain guide against your cam chain then you can no longer take up the slack that is created as the chain continues to stretch and lengthen due to normal use. You should not have to ...


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