Hot answers tagged

7

No - that's all you need to test. Now drive the car to a nearby garage and get them to do a front-end alignment on it - you won't have gotten everything exactly where it needs to be, so let them fix it to specification. As an added bonus, it puts a fresh pair of mechanics eyes onto your work, so after it's been aligned, you know that everything is good.


5

Replace that joint - if it is showing that much movement it needs replacing.


4

Keep the torch pointed at the exact same spot, don't move it around. There is usually dirt or metal shaving nearby that will start to glow orange, that's your cue that it's hot enough. 30 seconds is a good reference, 2 minutes is on the long side. Splash some water on it until it stops sizzling. If it didn't sizzle, it wasn't hot enough. The idea of heat is ...


4

2 things about removing inner tie-rods: Yes, the outer tie-rod (tie-rod end) needs to come off first in order for most tie-rod removal tools to go on In my experience, tie-rod removal tools don't have the grip to handle the amount of torque needed to remove a tie-rod that is seized with rust and age. I've tried them but ended up using a pipe wrench. One ...


4

This appears to be perfectly reasonable amounts of play. You have ball joints on both ends of the tie rod outer, so you can expect to be able to rotate it as you are. Given the function of a tie rod, this doesn't impact vehicle dynamics much. Now, what may actually be a problem depends on how easily you could rotate the tie rod outer. If this was very easy (...


4

Using a BFH (Big F-ING Hammer), hit the steering knuckle right on the end, directly in line with the arm. Leave the jack in place and don't be afraid of it. Hit it like you mean it. The tie rod end should pop free of the knuckle arm in two or three whacks. The principle here is, the vibration from the hit travels through the arm and dislodges the tie Rod end....


3

You need to visually verify where the movement is occuring. Jacking it up and checking for play is a great first step. What you need to do is actually see where the movement is coming from in order to know which parts need to be replaced. If there is deflection in the outer tie rod end, you'll be able to see the movement. There should be zero deflection ...


3

Ford's service information shows 80Nm or 60ft. lbs and some thread locker.


3

From your comment, the inner tie rod came out of the rack. First inspect the end of the joint and the rack and pinon. It would have taken some time for the joint to work its way lose. This may have cause ware on the threads and end of the joint. Hopefully the boot is still in one piece. Be careful when reinstalling the joint. Getting an inner tie rod end ...


2

I was a Service Manager for and Acura dealership. Also an ASE master tech. Put the boot in hot water for a few minutes. This will soften the boot, making it more pliable, allowing you to push/slide it in place. They are very tight so they will seal well and have a ridge to help keep them in place. You can put a little grease on he inner lip of the boot, but ...


2

Using a proper ball joint separator makes this much easier - either a pickle fork (basically a wedge that you hammer in): or threaded-type:


2

Driving around with the outer ones good while the inner ones are toast should not cause problems with good outer ones ... ... HOWEVER ... Your real issue here is not whether damage will occur to your outer tie rods, but whether the car is safe to drive with ugly inner ones. You'll have to assess whether the health and well being of your family, yourself, ...


2

I have always tested my balls joints by jacking up on the suspension lower arm to just get the tyre off the surface, which keeps the suspension roughly in the "normal" position (safety - not getting any human body parts under the car). Then trying to "rattle" or move the tyre / wheel in the horizontal axis (holding it at 9 and 3 as on a clock face) and ...


2

It's all about the alignment. Typically a car's alignment is set up for stability compromised for tire wear. The car will have a little negative camber on all wheels, moderate caster, slight toe in on the back wheels, and slight toe out in the front for front wheel drive cars. Stability is nice and makes people feel safe and no one wants to replace tires ...


2

I am assuming you had an alignment since changing the tie rod. The alignment spec may be a little different than it was before. Toe in is more stable than toe out. This stability may make you feel slower.


2

Here you go, "Tighten the nut to 30 N.m plus 120 degrees (22 lb ft plus 120 degrees). Inspect to ensure that 21/2-41/2 threads are visible above the nylon washer."


2

Assuming the track rods and ends have not spun separately and caused the alignment issue. It's likely that as one wheel hit the hole & the other has snatched to full lock when the joint popped out, that a lot of energy has been put through the rack assembly, quite often what happens is that the clamps that secure the rack to the bulkhead have bent on ...


1

The obvious answer here to me is, if you are hearing a noise which you've never heard before, it's not normal. Heim joints themselves should have a full 360° turning capability without binding. So, one of three things I can think of are going on here. There is an interference issue unrelated to the joint Something else is worn out which you've not taken ...


1

Solar Mike is correct. The known terminology to anyone with shop experience will call it a "sway bar end link" it provides stability and attempts to keep your tires planted to the pavement (which is where you want them planted, not in the air). The most common name is "sway bar end link" if you are looking to replace them, be sure to get new hardware (nuts) ...


1

I was originally going to make this a comment, but decided to make it answer because it describes the test in a different way... The problem with testing ball joints separate from being installed in the vehicle vs after they are installed on the vehicle is that the installed versions have this long type 3 lever attached which makes it easier to move. A ...


1

The installation direction gives a deceptive description. The above pictured tie rod is what you would expect to get (this one is specific to your car). Note the washer. The washer installs between the tie rod and rack. The two tangs in the washer lock into the two holes in the rack (they are pictured in #4 in your picture). Once the tie rod is tight then ...


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