10

It sounds like you already know why a gasoline engine keeps the fuel/air ratio as close to the stoichiometric ratio as possible, but just for the sake of information for anyone else: The stoichiometric fuel/air ratio is the amount of oxygen required to burn all of the gasoline completely. A "lean" burn leaves some oxygen leftover and a "rich" burn means the ...


8

If the engine is controlled via cable (drive by cable) directly from the gas pedal, then there is no difference if you were to open the throttle by hand and open the throttle plates. In fuel injected cars of this type, there is usually a throttle position sensor which tells the computer how far the plates are open and adjusts the other engine components ...


6

To get us on the same footing, I'm going to assume by saying "clutch pressed halfway" you are suggesting the clutch be halfway engaged (meaning, you are still getting power from the engine, but it's not fully engaged). What you are talking about is called slipping the clutch. It is a process whereby you can get the engine within the power/torque band ...


5

I am highly surprised that no one mentioned it specifically, but the answer is detonation. Poisson Fish was close, but extra wear from increased cylinder temperature isn't the main problem. The main problem is the extra heat causing petrol to self-ignite before the spark and destroy the motor. Diesel doesn't suffer from this problem as it basically works on ...


5

The Toyota Echo (and most cars pre-2011ish) uses a cabled throttle assembly, so you should be able to tighten the cable fairly easily. Look for the following in your engine bay You see the nut to the left of the arrow, that's where you can tighten the system. A good link is http://www.toyotaownersclub.com/forums/topic/112409-a-guide-to-adjusting-the-...


5

To improve exhaust emissions (clean air laws), some modern cars with drive-by-wire throttle have the lag you have noticed. Aftermarket devices known as "throttle controllers" or "throttle boosters" can reduce this lag. You may be interested in reading this: http://www.fitfreak.net/forums/1st-generation-gd-01-08/50073-throttle-delay-hesitation-noise.html ...


5

The throttle body at this age of vehicle has a real possibility of being 'dirty'. Take off the large hose connecting the throttle body to the air cleaner at the throttle body. If the visible throttle body parts are heavily coated with cruud, then clean the throttle plate and throttle body with a tooth brush and throttle body cleaner fluid. Operate the ...


5

What exactly is a throttle body? For a gasoline engine, the throttle body (TB) is the mechanism which controls the flow of air into a fuel injected engine. It is the "front door" if you will. Inside of most TBs you'll find at least one butterfly valve. There will usually be a main rod going through the center of the butterfly valve which allows the ...


5

I would bet the engine in your car is drive-by-wire, which means the computer is controlling the throttle, not you. In doing so, it is going to look at the load put on the engine and a bunch of other factors and give it only the throttle it can use as well as the gas ... at least in high gear. By going WOT in this instance, you'll not be causing your engine ...


4

Most likely case is a bad throttle position sensor or a bad air sensor (some cars use mass air flow, some use manifold pressure). This is typically not something that can be seen in codes, but must be identified by comparing sensor data and graphs. Other possibilities could be a vacuum leak, but that would probably throw a code/check engine light. Of ...


4

First I would find out if it is drive by wire (electronic throttle), or cable. Since it's a 2002 I'm going to guess cable. Also, if it were electronic throttle, there are many redundancies and checks in the system and the dash would have the MIL lit. Since that doesn't apply, I'm pretty confident it's a cable throttle. So, check under the hood for a loose ...


4

Because the Honda Fit is meant to have great fuel economy and having sluggish throttle response helps. Get the car to a shop that can reprogram the operating software. With mechanical systems, it was as simple as decreasing or eliminating the accelerator's free travel, which you could do with a set of pliers and some cuss words.


4

I don't know for sure, but would bet your best option is the last one. I know straightening tubes of any sort is a very hard option. There should be an Allen head bolt which is clamping to the forks. You don't want to take the fork loose if you can help it, as getting alignment back right could be a huge pain in the butt for the uninitiated. If replacement ...


4

Mechanically, it's a bit of a throwback to carburettor equipped bikes - my motorbike, for example, can be a little bit unforgiving when it's cold and it's not nice to go to pull away and have the engine splutter. In fact, an inexperienced rider could easily fall off because of it! And, as you've highlighted, a badly set up bike might have issues idling. ...


4

These are common symptoms of an split air hose allowing unmetered air into the engine intake. Check all air related hoses for cracks. Hoses include the main air intake, crank case ventilation system and vacuum hoses.


4

One of the few reasons to change to an aftermarket throttle body is performance. The throttle body is a common bottle neck that may restrict air flow. This restriction comes from one of two places. The engine has had upgrades or some kind that allow it to "breath" better. While the throttle body was not restrictive before the upgrades, now that the engine ...


4

The time involved makes me suspect something heat related. I'd suggest opening up the hood and seeing if you can get access to the throttle body, it will probably look something like this: The throttle cable is the part leading from the green plastic bit towards the upper right to the brownish quadrant near the middle of the image. Have somebody sit in the ...


4

Double check your code, Mitchell doesn't list a P2104 for the Aveo. This code also seems to be specific to Fords. Problems with the TAC after jump starts are caused by the initial low battery voltage and the jump start. This is fairly common on electronically controlled throttles. Since the code cleared by it self you shouldn't have to worry about it. ...


3

1) Does that diagnosis sound correct? Seafoam sounds like a good way to go, but in this case it isn't going to cure the ill. The throttle body itself needs to be cleaned. I found this video which should show you pretty much how to clean it (as long as your engine is the same as the G35 in the video). Since the engine has reusable gaskets, as long as you are ...


3

There are many lubricants that get 'gummy' with cold. Perhaps the following will help. Let the motor idle and become warm. if it takes 15 minutes or more, fine. Just ensure the area you have an issue with is warm. Turn the motor off. (safety first) Use a carb cleaner to spray off the oil you used to lubricate. Procure a product with Molybdenum-...


3

No, there are no benefits to giving your car throttle immediately after startup. This extra throttle will not recover the battery from the amount of power you just used to start the car any better than it will by just driving immediately after you start up. Also, given that you have a fuel-injected vehicle, there's no need to warm up the engine for more than ...


3

As @handyhowie indicated, the source of the issue is more than likely unmetered air or simply an 'air leak' This creates what's called a 'lean condition' for your engine. When you are lean in your combustion mixture you have too much oxygen and not enough gas. The symptoms are exactly what you describe. You can also have your engine temperature increase ...


3

Hard to say with the information given. Sounds like retarted timing or not enough air or fuel (too rich / lean) . A repair manual will be infinitely useful in testing/troubleshooting. Things to test: codes, even if the CEL isn't on there might be something stored. air filter spark plugs (clean, gapped correctly) wires cap rotor coil vacuum lines (check ...


3

As fair as I know, it is the same since the wire turns the throttle valve. The commanding wire doesn't do anything else, nor it has any other sensors/wires attached. It is a simple mechanism to act over the throttle. The ECU (computer), may adjust the fuel/air mix by acting over other electronic valves and mainly depending on the exhaust gases "quality", ...


3

The fault code is related to your TPS Your TPS is a throttle position sensor. The fault code is not necessarily indicative of a broken wire although it could be. It sounds as though you have validated some of the wiring to your ECU but there are some additional checks you can perform to ensure that the issue is indeed your TPS. Check your wiring FROM ...


3

No (or maybe more accurately – not for long), that is why you have a choke. Opening the throttle does allow more air in, but should also be causing more fuel to come in as well to preserve the mixture. It sounds like you might have a stuck choke or perhaps your idle adjustments are off. That said, when the engine is stopped, there is no airflow to pull in ...


3

Yes there is a large benefit of response and efficiency and if not for the cost would likely be seen in more factory equipped vehicles other then the high performance production models (like BMW M3). The combination of independent throttle bodies, plenum and turbo compared to placement of the single throttle body has a direct affect on ready air flow. A ...


3

At high RPM and wide open throttle, there is no significant differences between either one. Here a single throttle body might have a slight advantage since you have less turbulence in the intake runners caused from throttle plates and stuff. The biggest, most noticeable advantage you will feel from using ITBs is when you are driving on low throttle or idle ...


3

Well I figured it out. The issue was unrelated to the throttle body or any repairs I did. The problem was because I completely removed my battery. Upon re-installing the battery, the cars passive anti theft system (PATS) was engaging. Strange, because I was never aware I had an alarm system. Solution: 1) remove car horn fuse 2) close door and lock 3) ...


3

To answer your question, it depends on the vehicle. If the vehicle has a lot of horsepower, it can overcome the brakes at high speed. As I stated in the comments, create a fail safe switch which will shutdown your system and allow you to gain full control of your vehicle. If you have a runaway situation where the vehicle goes to wide open throttle (WOT), ...


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