11

You're glossing over how the hack actually happens. The hack involves erasing the old keys and then reprogramming a new key to the vehicle. If the car uses a smart key then you're in right away. If the car has a physical key, then having the correct cut of key is also required. Cars also fall into two categories. The first is the real expensive cars that ...


6

Unfortunately, simply unplugging a fuse isn't going to stop a determined thief, as they often tow cars away rather than going to the noise and effort of trying to start them... I'd suggest some kind of physical lock, either on the steering wheel, gear lever/handbrake, or similar - they often act as a visual deterrent to casual thieves as well, who will go ...


4

If I was as worried as you seem to be about this, which I am not, I'd probably do the following; Go to a breakers yard and buy the OBD II port from a similar model. I'd then unscrew the existing port and push it back into the recess of the dashboard, then fit the new dummy port in its place. Alternatively, add an aftermarket security measure such as an ...


4

I think modifying the OBD-II port is complete overkill to deal with a possible theft issue. In addition to being a tricky issue as to how exactly to modify it, as the other answer points out, it may actually be illegal. When I have had to leave cars unattended and I have had some concern about possible theft, I usually unplug a component in the ignition ...


4

You could take the screw out of the center of the knob. Remove it, then put it on only to shut off or turn on the fuel.


4

By using an non-programmed key to start the vehicle, it has triggered the anti-theft system. According to the Owner's Manual; To disarm the system: Press the UNLOCK button on the keyless entry transmitter. Also, using a valid sentry key and moving the ignition switch to the ON/START position will disarm the system. If none of this works, you will ...


3

Rather than the fuel pump relay/fuse, you could pull the starter relay/fuse. If the starter can't turn, the thief isn't going to kill your battery by cranking the starter until it dies. You could install a hidden button and connect it to the starter wire (between the ignition and the relay), so you need to press the button and turn the key to start the ...


3

You would need to "Re-Engineer" an adapter once you accomplish "Disabling" your OBD-2 port. How you do that, is honestly up to your judgement. Depending on the vehicle they also have factory ports in very odd locations. Nissan, Toyota and a few European brands are known for this. Vehicle hacking is becoming a real thing that people DO have to worry about. ...


2

Tie the ignition wire to +12V to simulate ignition on. Grounding the green wire will simulate ignition off.


2

When you turn the ignition key on in a car, it provides +12 volts to the ignition system and accessories, so I would expect the green wire should be connected to +12 volts (but the documentation of the device should clearly describe its requirements).


2

It would help to know what type of car it is but on a petrol vehicle, a quick and easy solution is to remove the king lead from the coil (it's the one that runs to the centre of the distributer cap). No coil lead means no spark which on a petrol car means it won't start. Unfortunately this won't work on a Diesel as these don't rely on spark plugs.


2

Basically, you want a device to activate when the 'system' is 'armed' and the door is opened. The easiest way to do this would be to tap into one of the outputs of an existing system, or install an aftermarket alarm system. If you want a completely different system, you will need door pin sensors to determine when the door has opened. You MIGHT be able to ...


2

Most parts of cars are attached pretty firmly and need tools and time to get out, the gang were most likely after parts that could be easily stolen without many tools. These would typically be service items, consumables or covers/caps to access them. However, as you got the car started there's only a few things they may have taken: headlights air filter ...


1

IIRC There are no button combinations to retrieve a code. The theft lock system has to be reset with a scantool and a new VIN has to be written to the new module. Anyone with a Tech2 or similar scantool can do this.


1

For theft-prevention, this doesn't make any sense on any modern car. They have immobilizers. Practically the only possibility to steal the car is with a key. If the thief has the key, it's possible to reconnect the battery. So, you are mainly looking at drain prevention. For drain prevention, you need this only if you leave the car unused for many, many ...


1

On my vehicles, the only “side effect” is I have to reset the clock, as it defaults to 12:00 when the battery is reconnected. I find this only a minor inconvenience, outweighed by the knowledge that I will return to a vehicle with a working battery. I have done this with a 2017 Chevy Trailblazer and not had any bad effects. One thing to consider though, is ...


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