Hot answers tagged

10

You can do a leak down test but look at your spark plugs first If your burning oil you will see it on your spark plugs. They will be black and have buildup on them. If you find one or two that look that way and all the others are very light in color to tan then you probably have oil getting into the combustion chamber. Here are some nice responses ...


8

On page 186 of the owners manual there are instructions that tell you what to do when this indicator blinks. Highlighted below: (highlight added for emphasis) Given that you've tried shifting to different modes several times, you may not know what mode it thinks it's shifting from. You may be able to simply go through all the possible sequences described ...


8

Your truck is designed to carry that load. If you consider carrying a full set of passengers. 1 in the front, 3 in the back, that weight would exceed your current load of 500 pounds. I would not be concerned at all regarding doing on what you plan on doing. In fact, make it 1,000 pounds and do it, your truck would handle that just fine although it may ...


8

Yes, it is by design ... because it helps to equalize wear across the sprocket teeth and chain links. Here's why I had originally shared a link in the comments which presents the formula to calculate what's known as hunting tooth frequency. Mesh rate aside, this is governed by the the number of teeth in the sprocket and chain, a and b respectively: gcd(a,...


7

Not a desired answer, but with no leaks (to ground or into coolant) it's possible that your engine is just using/burning what some manufacturers would consider a normal amount of oil: How much is too much? Audi, BMW, and Subaru stick firmly to the statement that oil consumption is a normal part of a car’s operation. Subaru considers a quart burned ...


7

I'm wondering if you are having an issue with oil bypass, as in going through the breather/PCV and ending up getting burned through the intake. A simple catch can would prove this out for you. This happens quite a bit and is easily solved. Two things. The leakdown test will not tell you anything about your oil loss. Its not what a leakdown test if for (...


6

For a really quick solution, try getting hold of a spare seatbelt from a scrap vehicle (I doubt the shape changes often, so I expect any reasonably recent Toyota would do, just get one that is the same as the belts in your car). Remove the tongue (The t shaped bit) from the belt, and keep it to hand - then, when you're driving on the trails and want to ...


6

Tail light fuse will be third from the left along the top row. As for a concise fuse diagram with full descriptions... Will that do?


5

I had the same problem, it was a vacuum line for me. I found the leak, fixed it and the light no longer blinks. So check out your vacuum line for leaks.


4

Take the cables off of the battery and clean the terminals. You have a bad connection on one side or the other which is not allowing full power to get past. When you place the jumper onto the system, it is directly fed to the cables and allows the vehicle to start. Along the same lines, it could also be that one of the two battery connections is not ...


4

Realistically, you haven't added any extra life to the vehicle itself. The vehicle is a combination of it's sub-parts (ie: engine, transmission, differential, etc.). Any part at any time can fail for whatever reason. Even the engine is made up of sub-parts to create it's whole. You have definitely given the heads longer life, but you still have the rest of ...


4

The best way to test to see if your engine is timed correctly is to rotate the crank shaft through 720° of rotation then check your timing marks again. Since you (supposedly) have a non-interference motor, you will have no worries. If the marks line up again, then you're golden. You'll want to do this with a crank snout socket or put the harmonic balancer ...


4

See if the instructions located on this page will help you decide. Manual transmissions, while easier to deal with than automatics, are nothing to be trifled with. If you don't have a lot of mechanical know how, it's not something to be tackling on your own. If you get it apart and cannot put it back together again, a tranny shop is going to not want to take ...


4

According to the wiring diagram the power is supplied to the bulbs through the relay and then one fuse for each bulb. If the high beams work then the relay and fuses are working. The lights are controlled by the light switch by switching the ground side of the circuit. The high and low beam filaments are selected by this switch. If one set of the filaments ...


4

Even if the clutch slave cylinder moves, it doesn't mean it's moving enough. If the hydraulics need to be bled, the clutch won't disengage and the friction disk will be dragging on the pressure plate and flywheel. What you are describing is indicative of the clutch needing bled. EDIT: Considering what you said in your comment, it means you need either a new ...


4

You don't say why you needed a leakdown test in the first place. If you rotated the engine by hand in the opposite direction that it normally runs and it has a timing belt then it is possible that the valve timing may have jumped. You would have to remove part of the covers and check that all cam timing markes line up as per the manufacturers specs. If its ...


3

The longer you run it, the more damage you are going to cause. This will incur more cost when you do go to get it fixed due to the parts involved. Depending on which valve(s) is (are) sticking, you could be doing damage every time you start it up. I'm talking about the exhaust valve, as if one is open during the combustion cycle, you've damaged a valve and ...


3

Here is a standard procedure. You may need to use a vacuum hand pump to 'prime' the master cylinder. I have encountered the issue you are describing and the luxury of having a mighty vac to pull the brake fluid through the system. Once the master cylinder is primed, it becomes much easier and you begin to get traction on getting the air out and having the ...


2

Do you hear a click of the brake lock disengagement from the steering column when you depress the brake pedal, with the key in, engine on? If you don't, it could be either faulty wiring to the disengagement solenoid, or the solenoid itself failed (something rather rare, but I have fixed before). Depending on your comfort level, you could: Check the brake ...


2

This is nothing I'd be worried about. It Just looks like some discoloration and not burnt marks. It looks really clean and that's the main thing I'd be worried about.


2

I'm thinking it should work pretty well. I don't have any evidence to back up that statement, though. There is another method you may want to try to confirm, though. All you need is a magic marker (or Sharpie) Pull the valve out of the guide Use the marker and mark the seat face (the angled part where the valve seats at) all the way around Put the valve ...


2

The safe way of turning seatbelt chime/alarm off During these steps, do not touch the brake at all shut the door. turn the key on and get your instrument panel on ODO and turn key off. turn the key back on, press reset knob immediately. hold reset knob for 12_15 seconds and fasten the seat belt. xxxx miles should turn to b_on. release and press one time, it ...


2

As in the other answers, first check if you are or not getting power to those things that gets serviced when you turn the key. If you have a flat dead scenario here, then you need to check the ignition key. If you get these loads working (lights, radio, etc) and if the starter doesn't turn, check starter fuse, starter relay and starter exciter wire to its ...


2

The most common cause of this symptom is intermittent failure of the electrical contacts in the starter solenoid. Removal and disassembly of the starter is required to confirm this


2

Yes, the ride will soften over time as the springs start to weaken. If the ride is bad enough, then you can replace the shocks so the suspension absorbs more road impact. Trucks are set up to ride firm, so the ride you feel is by design. You can also purchase tires that provide a more comfortable ride. Trucks have hard tires (to carry load and reduce wear), ...


2

I doubt the new master cylinder was bled properly. The easiest way I have found, is to put a piece of clear tubing over the closest caliper nipple (usually left front), and extend that over the fender and submerge the other end in the master cylinder reservoir. Be sure to cover the fender to prevent brake fluid from damaging the paint. Crack the nipple. ...


2

If you are getting a misfire on cylinder 1 and a lean code to boot, I'd suggest your issue lies in the fuel injector for cylinder number one. Especially since this is inconsistent. A lean misfire would mean injector #1 isn't firing, or only partially firing. It could be because of it sticking or because the electromagnet is faulty. If it's sticking, the ...


2

Yes, I believe you have correctly diagnosed the problem. You should address this as soon as possible as the pump may seize up at any time. The squeal is your warning signal. If it seizes then you'll lose coolant flow and also likely lose other things on the same drive belt like alternator, power steering, and A/C.


1

It is possible the issue is at the ignition switch. The best way to test will be with a schematic and a test light to see that the ignition switch is getting voltage in, but is not putting voltage out when the key is turned. If the ignition switch does put out voltage, follow it down the line to the starter relay, and the starter. Also be sure to check ...


1

After looking at a ground distribution diagram the cruise, head lights and power door locks share some things in common. Given that some things I assume work and others that obviously don't, it would be isolated to a single branch of the circuit. Unfortunately these splices are located in the dash and the dash may need to be removed or pulled back to gain ...


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