52

The first thing I'd establish is to work out if the hub can be removed from the car with the wheel still attached. I encountered a similar scenario some years ago working on a car with locking wheel lugs and no key. I was able to remove the hub cap, dust cover and large castle bolt which allowed me to put the wheel and hub assembly on the bench. Doing ...


20

Remember that lug nuts are exposed to literally every element that could possibly cause corrosion. It sounds like your last nut is stuck due to some rust or oxidation that you can't see. Here's how I generally approach a badly stuck nut: Check your safety gear: eye protection, jack stands, everything to keep yourself from getting killed when this wheel ...


18

As you have reasonable access to the nut, I'd suggest using a nut splitter to split the nut and open it out, which should then allow you to withdraw the bolt and remove the parts - obviously both nut and bolt will need to be replaced, but you'd already worked that out!


12

There are a number of things you can do to unstick the nut before turning it: a lubricant or rust blaster. Keep things wet and give it time to work. heat cycling. Heat it up (gently) and let it cool. Repeat. If you oil it up and point a propane torch at it, you may start a fire, so be careful. It's not so important to heat just the nut or just the stud - ...


11

It looks to me like it has been over-tightened, beyond the point of failure of the bolt.


11

Did you ever wonder why an open ended wrench is angled at exactly 15° ? That's so you can turn a nut a little bit, flip the wrench over, turn it a little bit more, and get the job done! You mentioned that you can turn the wrench 1/8th of a turn. That's plenty! In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if the mount was designed to accommodate the 15° wrench flip ...


10

I've had great success in the past selecting a 12 sided socket that almost just say fits over the head of these types of bolts. Hammer it on so it's fully covering the head and sitting squarely then attach a ratchet and turn it out. This method has never once failed me. You do have to select an old socket however.


9

The connector will need to be replaced. It looks to be fused together. The metal connector terminals were the cause of the original problem. The usual problem is that the connector makes poor contact due to loose fit in the female terminals this causes resistance and therefore heating of the connectors.


8

In the perfect world, you just slide a wrench on the O2 sensor and it comes out. Unfortunately since its located in a "hostile" environment (lots of heat, lots of water and potential corrosion underneath) it typically gets pretty stuck, though most people eventually do have success getting it off. Careful not to start stripping it with that open ended ...


8

I would use my mig welder to weld a steel rod onto the head. You could weld a T shape on the end of the rod for something to hold. After removing each one, just cut the bolt off the end and repeat. The heat usually helps to free the bolt too. Make sure you protect anything nearby that could be damaged by sparks.


8

Got it!!! I had the replacement dipstick tube on hand so I knew how much was stuck in the engine. The broken dipstick in this video is much shorter but having the replacement on hand let me know I'd have to do something slightly different. But that video did mention it's probably not a good idea to drop something into the oil pan. So. Step 1. Get a Paper ...


7

If you're trying to use the stock wrench, go out and buy a proper one! I've never seen a stock one that is any use, and some of them are so bad they may as well be made of chocolate... A 4-way wrench is simply a cross-shaped bar with 4 different sizes of socket on the ends. You use the appropriate size one for your nuts, and then have effectively a t-bar, ...


7

First thing you need to get some type of penetrating oil. You need something like LiquidWrench,PB Blaster or SeaFoam. My personal favorite is PB Blaster. The second thing you need is patience. If you can, give the penetrant several days to work. I have had goodluck wrapping the fitting in a strip of rag and soaking it with the oil. If you can get the quick ...


7

Based on the pictures, I don't see any options besides cutting the bolt in half. A grinder wheel would make light work of cutting the bolt, but you may have to resort to a more primitive approach, i.e. a hacksaw.


6

If you are going to replace the sensor and have already purchased the replacement, cut the wires off of the old sensor and put a 1/2" drive deep well socket onto it (don't use the split socket for the O2 sensor to take it off, but you will use it to put it back on). Use a breaker bar to break it free, then use a ratchet the rest of the way. If you do not ...


6

My buddy recommends using Irwin Easy Outs. these to remove from inside the hex And these to remove from the outside Impact drivers are always recommended. If that doesn't do it, vise grips could, but could also cause more damage. Also getting some penetrating lube on them will help if you haven't already.


6

Cut a small slot in one edge of the periphery (muffler abrasive whizzer tool), and hammer a chisel in that slot to move the socket head capscrew in the loosening (CCW) direction. You needed to replace it anyway... Also, you CANNOT use too much PB blaster, Kroil, or whatever your favorite liquid penetrating oil is. Rap the head lightly with a hammer a few ...


6

Heat is the key to loosen the bolts off - I use a butane torch, if you have access to oxy torch, they can be carefully used too. Keep it local to the bolt as it can affect the rotor magnets which may or may not be an issue for you if you are replacing the actual rotor). Then for the knackered bolt heads, find a sacrificial Torx bit or the right size to jam ...


6

Dont you have to remove the connector with the green/black wire also? In your photo it looks like the connectors are melted together. You can get a knife and try to seperate them first. The blue wires goes to your blower speed setting switch on dash. The green/black wire goes to the blower. Even if you remove the connector. The old connector may not fit to ...


6

The head is probably just rounded off. Hammer a 3/8" socket on or use a 10mm twist socket on it. Maybe heat it or use a penetrating fluid on it as well. Worse comes to worse the head snaps and you have to drill and retap the bolt hole.


6

For stubborn nuts , heat the nut with a torch, then move the flame away and immediately apply WD-40 or any other penetrating oil against the heated bolt threads. The quick change from high heat to to the cool oil will cause the nut to retract and expand, allowing the penetrating oil deeper into the threads to create a slippery surface. You can do this ...


5

Learn from my mistake!! I attempted to use four different chisels to 'counter rotate' the stuck nut. NEVER do this. What happens is that the chisel force drives the annular ring of the lower portion of the nut into the well where the curved face normally sits. You get the rest of the nut finaly chisseled off and you are STUCK with the measley shxxty annular ...


5

I'm having the same problem right now. I tried a correctly-sized triple square .. but it still stripped .. (seat-belt retaining bolt on a VW) perhaps due to the thread-lock compound and the pressure involved. After calling around, mechanics suggest: Using an angle grinder (very gradually) to grind off two sides (four sides if you're good) to get a spanner/...


5

I wouldn't hesitate using an impact to loosen the crankshaft pulley retaining bolt. The reason for this is because even though there is an impact involved, it is a rotary impact. The crank itself would incur no damage, nor would the bearings. The bearings take a worse beating during normal operation than they would during crankshaft pulley retaining bolt ...


5

Couldnt you drill the head off to be able to get some stuff out of the way, cut the bolt further down, drill a center hole with a small bit and proceed drilling away the remaining stub?... You have to grab the bolt from behind so it wont keep turning but it might work. (hard to say from the pictures but I have the impression that once cut down the bolt ...


5

I was in a similar situation (car, not a bike) once and I didn't know about nut splitters (see Nick C answer) at that time. I was able to get at the nut with a Dremel and a very small (1" diameter) cutting disk with a flexible extension between the Dremel and the disk. With the disk I was able to slice diagonally across the nut (couldn't get the angle to ...


5

Try torching them again. The only bolts that I couldn't get off with a torch are the ones that snapped. If the bolt didn't turn an orange glow, you're not getting it hot enough. Cutting them off, as has been pointed out in the other answers, won't let the bolt magically slide out because a bolt that won't budge is a bolt that seized (corrosion and rust ...


5

You should definitely try to extract it. Preparation: Heat the manifold with a blowtorch Jolt the bolt with a pin punch Soak the bolt with bp-blaster or another penetrating oil Removal If the bolt is protruding: Place two nuts on it, counter them against each other and try to screw the bolt out. If the bolt is protruding but not enough for the two nuts: ...


5

It looks like ViceGrips would have to come in vertically, so you won't have much leverage with just the pliers, but you can use an adjustable wrench or water pump (slip joint) pliers, or maybe even a screwdriver slipped into the opening of the jaws to get some extra torque. You may want to soak the fastener in PB Blaster or Kroil (or whatever your favorite ...


5

Getting a nut off in this case can be done, how you would attack it depends on access to it. If the nut sticks out you could use a nut breaker to crack it off, or get a big pair of locking pliers, tightening the damn thing down as much as you can. If you can't get a pliers or nut breaker on then I'd try to use a rotary tool and a metal cutting disk to cut ...


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