Hot answers tagged

91

Can you? Yes. Should you? Not in my opinion. 2006 Civics with 244k miles are a dime a dozen. Sell it and put the money in something like a savings or 5 year CD, then instead of losing money you will earn money. Cars sitting that long take a lot of care to prep properly and even then a lot of things that are usually lubed or turned tend to dry out and will ...


78

I've done it. I don't recommend it, unless the car has exceptional sentimental value or is especially equipped for an unusual job. Sell it on Craigslist or better method, and then, buy another one in 5 years. You can buy the exact same year make model and color if you really want to, but I rather doubt you will. OK, so the logic is, "but wait. This ...


35

Having stored many cars - both successfully and unsuccessfully - I can pass on the following advice, should you try to do this: Pick the location carefully. All "outside" locations are not equivalent. You want a solid, dry, non-living substrate to park over. Parking on grass is about the worst. A paved driveway is the best. The earth is a wet planet, the ...


26

Apart from the value loss (if it even has any value today), you are taking a couple of risks. Assuming you're not moving it just starting it every other week these are some of the risks I see: Vandalism (I have seen this many many times, cars just standing, gets it's screens smashed, or some idiot trying to steel a screwdriver left on the back floor or ...


17

At best, starting it every two weeks will benefit the engine and anything the engine oil touches. Keep in mind that you should change your oil every X number of miles OR yearly; whichever comes first. Tell me, do you plan to: Clean the car interior so that mold does not grow Turn on the wipers to make sure they haven't seized Use some washer fluid to make ...


13

It sounds like you're spot on for your car. Words of advice: If you only want to change the oil once a year, use something like Mobil 1 Annual Protection, which is a full synthetic oil. It's good for one year or 20k miles. Remember, oil is dependent upon time as well as mileage. Driving it once every 1-3 weeks for 20-30 minutes is spot on for less used cars....


10

This doesn't make any economic sense. If you include the cost of your time, looking after the car properly for 5 years will probably cost more than it is worth. And at the end of the layup you are going to discover what unexpected problems need fixing when you start using it again. Also people's life situations change over 5 years, so there is no guarantee ...


5

The answer depends a lot on where you are, because of the climate. In Seattle I would do it only if you have a customer for a ton of iron oxide in 2024. In El Paso you don't even need to cover the car (actually, a cover may increase or prolong condensation after a cold night) unless you want to keep the varnish's shine during the sand storms — but ...


4

Of course you can! It may need insurance and tax if it's left on a public highway, and without insurance, you may come back to no car, a vandalised car, and no recompense. That's before the depreciation of the car itself, as already mentioned. Then there's the tyres - left in the sun will mean some are scrap, and will have flat spots. The brakes may well ...


4

5 years outside? if you were talking about a storage facility then possibly especially if it was a rare car... But you should consider selling it then getting another in 5 years time.


2

Start it and be done with it. 2.5 months sitting isn't really a big deal. You may need to charge the battery, but probably not. Just run it at idle until it warms up, check for leaks, drive it to the gas station and fill it up with fresh gas. You really shouldn't have any issues with it which weren't there before you parked it. 2.5 months is a trivial amount ...


2

Unlike brake fluid, oil isn't hygroscopic (absorbs humidity) and is not capable of chemical dissolution with water, which produces new substances. An added note: DOT 3 and DOT 4 are glycol based, which is hygroscopic; DOT 5 is silicone based, which is not hygroscopic. Hence why you should never mix the two, as it will become a kind of gel substance. Sure, ...


2

Please check YOUR tires for any differing details but Continental says this at: Continental Tire Customer Help In cases where the tires will be supporting the vehicle, it is permissible to inflate the tires to the maximum pressure listed on the sidewall. Be sure to return the inflation pressure to recommended usage pressure before operating the vehicle. ...


2

Let's take a look at how cars depreciate in value. I bought a car 3 years ago. It has fallen in value over 30%. So, 10% per year is a reasonable depreciation for a car. Stocks, on the other hand, appreciate 8% per year, or 47% per 5 years (taking into account interest accruing even more interest). Of course investing to stocks has risks but putting your ...


1

That's a lot of questions! Still, let's see… If I use this container correctly, am I still incurring significant risks that are hard to control? Define "significant" and "hard to control". If you are a patient, thoughtful person, it's my opinion that fuel containers can be filled and handled with reasonable safety. It's not as ideal as if ...


1

I think you are missing the point. You have changed the verbiage of "store your tires dry" to "dry your tires". These are two different things. It's saying your tires should be dry when putting them into bags, meaning no excess oil, lubricants, rubber sealants, or water. In other words, if you've just washed your tires off, let them dry ...


1

I agree with @Paulster2, save his advice to idle the motor until it warms up. Instead, minimize the time the engine is running but not yet warmed up (when the most engine wear occurs) by starting the engine and driving the vehicle. Still, don't abuse the machinery with heavy throttle application or high revs until the oil has warmed.


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