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33

You could pretty much guarantee that he wouldn't treat his own car like this Starter motors are not designed for continuous use and will overheat due to the high currents involved and should be left to cool down after use. If they overheat, the enamel insulation could be burnt off the copper coils causing shorts, or plastic components could melt. I ...


27

If the battery is completely dead, especially after sitting for two years, it most likely won't take a charge. Without the battery getting charged, you most likely don't have enough juice coming through the jumper cables to give it the power it needs to turn the Aztec over. Double check the voltage at the battery without the jumper cables on it. If it is ...


13

It's the battery Starting an engine takes a much larger energy impulse than jumper cables can deliver directly through their typically-thin wires and the small surface area of their alligator clamps. (Unless you use very heavy jumper cables). So the way jump starting works, is you slowly add enough energy to the weak battery until it's charged up enough ...


10

Others have already told you the battery is a goner, I'll go into why: When a battery discharges lead sulfate builds up on the plates. It is deposited in very tiny crystals that will covert back to lead and lead oxide when the battery is charged again. However, if the crystals are allowed to sit they slowly merge, forming big crystals. These won't revert ...


5

They were combined many years ago, one was called the Dyna-start (made by Lucas aka the prince of darkness... :) ), other manufacturers were Bosch and Delco. They fell out of popularity due to the fact that they would do both jobs but increasing demands of power both for the starting function and the generating function increased. More powerful engines ...


5

This is a unique exception not applicable to your car, but cars with Multiair engines like my 124 Spider have a manufacturer specified procedure to prime the Multiair actuator (a.k.a. the Multair brick), after storage by extended cranking However, the manual emphasises that the starter should be allowed to cool down for 5 seconds, for every 10 to 15 seconds ...


4

If your starter is indeed ruined, I would take the repair bill to that mechanic and demand he pay for the damage he caused to the starter. If he knows anything about cars, he knew what he was doing and therefore intentionally burned up your starter. Not to mention he would have shortened the life of the battery for this type of "deep cycle" duty that a ...


4

It's the fuel (as well as the battery). After 2 years, the fuel in the tank has almost certainly gone bad. It's most probably also gummed up your fuel injectors. Try spraying some starter fluid down the air intake to see if you can get it to run a little while. If it does, but immediately dies once the starter fluid evaporates, you need new gasoline.


4

You need to ask your mechanic about this,I can not think about one single positive effect of trying to burn the starter out. BURNING OUT A STARTER is the same as destroying it,a starter uses a lot of power when running i am talking about 100-200amps. The solenoid pull the gear in position and connect power to the brushes,the solenoid is a high power relay,...


4

If the machine is still under warranty, take it back to the dealer and have them fix it. That's what the warranty is for, and it's their obligation to do so. New vehicle warranties come from the manufacturer, not from the dealer. If multiple dealers are available to you, you might take it to another dealer rather than the one whose "fix" was unavailing.


4

Its probably not the fuseable link; more likely is that the starter motor needs to be shimmed. The starter motor has a small gear ( the pinion gear) which sticks out on a shaft to engage the flywheel. if the pinion gear doesn’t stick out far enough, it will spin but not turn the flywheel. The starter will test fine on the bench. Sometimes the pinion ...


3

Even though my old battery appeared to take a charge from a borrowed trickle-charger, I took it to Autozone and they confirmed it was bad: 11.83 volts, only 2% charged. With a new battery installed, she started right up. I was shocked! If someone would like to summarize the answers/suggestions in the comments above and post them here, I'll mark your answer ...


2

I had same issue on saab 9-3 2007. Problem was a faulty cables between battery and chassis. Garage has added additional cable connection between battery and engine (ground) instead of replacing complete wire lines and voila, it starts perfectly again.


2

There are two connections because the current to drive the starter is high so it has a direct supply from the battery and the other connection is the control. The connection through the ignition switch, park switch then solenoid is for two reasons: To operate the starter when it is safe to do so ie not in gear The starter needs a high current (in excess of ...


2

For what it's worth, in this new generation of GLE from Mercedes-Benz, they've incorporated what they call an Integrated Starter-Alternator which does exactly what you lay out. They've managed to integrate this into their new line of I-6 engines and have been able to reduce weight on the engine significantly. Engineering Explained talks about it a little ...


2

However an electric motor can also be used as a generator. If the design allows it, why isn't starter used as an alternator? You're not the only one to realize this. Honda has integrated motor assist, which is an integrated starter-generator. It allows providing electric boost to the engine from a battery when such boost is required, and then charging the ...


2

Whether it was the starter or not that was causing the issue, it certainly now needs replacing. The fallen part is a breather, there are often two on these starter motors, one on the solenoid cavity, and one on the end head that covers the brush gear. It's fallen off because the innards nearby have gotten hot enough to melt/burn the flange that was holding ...


2

Yes, the starter could catch fire or it could be completely destroyed if it remains engaged while the engine is running. Check to make sure that the ignition key is returning by itself to the RUN position after you release the key from the START position. If it is not, turn the key back to RUN after the engine starts, and the starter should disengage. In ...


2

The reason is that this is called “low power indexing” and is to reduce tooth to tooth abutment. How it is done is that there are 2 windings in the solenoid: the pull-in winding and the hold-in winding. The pull-in winding is earthed by going through the starter motor, the hold-in winding goes directly to earth. The 50A or so for the pull-in winding is ...


2

I keep thinking why was the starter motor "changed a few times"; That is not normal,as you know; oil leaks do not affect the starter motor much,it is very enclosed,the oil flows around it; 1- First answer:Yes; but...a totally dead battery is a no-no; for 2 reasons: a) it will require extraordinarily good jumper cables,in the order of 100 dollars for the ...


1

Use a volt meter to check the battery voltage when the engine is running and again when it is stopped. If the voltage is 13v or above when the engine is running, then the alternator is working fine. If the alternator appears to be working and the voltage is below 12v when the engine is stopped then your battery is likely dying. The easiest way to test the ...


1

As you stated hybrid technology varies by model and brand. I will answer in generalities. The manufacturer warranties the starter for at least 36,000 miles and in some cases 100,000 miles. They don't want to replace components for free. For the most part components are designed to last past the warranty. The start-stop function is more complex than just ...


1

The reason for the failures can vary. Are the starters new, rebuilt or remanufactured? It is possible that the rebuilder was supplied with a substandard component. If that is the case, you will be replacing your starter until that inventory is used up. Talk to your supplier and see if they can source you a different brand or perhaps the next model up in ...


1

It certainly could be something like what's happening in that Harley video (which seems to be a damaged starter motor winding). First, definitely not good practice to run the starter when the bike is running. That could definitely damage teeth on the starter assembly or the starter clutch. Second, it's not too difficult to pull the starter. In fact, you ...


1

Relay Is designated L in the image below, there is a fuse for the relay and it is #59 . Source


1

My ‘02 Honda Accord has an ignition relay that went bad. Check that. On my Accord it is in the top left most part of the engine compartment. Separate from the fuses. When it happened to me I changed the spark plugs to a noticeable performance improvement, but didn’t fix the problem. I brought it into the dealer and they identified it as the relay. Cheap ...


1

Thank you. I bought a brand new starter and it arrived with a test report. Report seems legit and all ok, except solenoid results. It indicates "Close Test (Pull in); FAIL" and "Open test: FAIL". Emailed manufacturer, awaiting a reply.


1

This is usually caused by the starter motor armature shaft bushings wearing out. Because of the worn out bushings the armature shaft gets skewed off its axis and binds in the bushing. Tapping the solenoid with a hammer (you could also tap the starter body and get the same result) frees the shaft and allows the motor to turn. If low quality bushings were ...


1

I don't often see this mentioned but it can be a beast to diagnose because it is intermittent in nature and the problem "internal" to the battery. Internal to the battery are the "inter-cell" link connectors. (years ago they were external) They can become defective and cause intermittent dead battery symptoms. What occurs is the battery cell connector ...


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