We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
3

Anyways, there is no tensioner between the alternator and the motor, it's just one belt that connects the two with nothing in between - at seemingly a static distance. It's installed by removing the bolts on the alternator so it can be moved into and out of place. The alternator actually pivots around the lower bolt, so you can remove the belt. The ...


3

There's a few things to answer here: Do you have an LX It's not important for your issue, but if you really want to know, search Google for a Honda VIN decoder and enter your VIN. Worn out wheel bearings I've had this happen to 2 vehicles. The noise would get worse at higher speeds, and get even worse while steering at high speeds (curve on the highway, ...


3

I'm not positive this is your specific defect but it's something to be aware of. It's quite possible the tire shop futzed your tire pressure sending unit inside the tire and now the pressure sending unit is loose within tire. I just worked on a car with this defect and the low speed noises sound similar to your description. Verify by removing the entire ...


3

Bearings can behave differently "under load" compared to not under load - are they sealed bearings? There might be a small bit of dirt in there


3

If the pram has spoked wheels it's likely that one or more of the spokes are loose, OR there there are a couple of spokes rubbing against each other as the wheel rotates and they flex.


2

May also be very possible that your brakes have gone out. When your brakes wear they rub the rotors causing the grinding and the squealing due to it being metal on metal. You want to have this looked at ASAP.


2

It could be one of three things: Your window glass rubbing on the rubber (not a big deal, but sometimes hard to get to go away). If it's the glass rubbing on the rubber, just try cleaning your windows really well: sometimes this will happen from sticky stuff being on the glass and rubbing. You could also try lubricating the rubber next to the window with ...


2

That's a difficult one... 5000 miles of 'harsher' braking is easily enough to wear pads down. The brakes may just be squeaking due to a small bit of debris or dust in the the braking mechanism. However they could also be squeaking due to the pads being worn out. To be on the safe side the brakes need checking out. I would recommend perhaps you postpone your ...


2

Sounds like you did the job right. The clip may have been dislodged by a stone at some point.


1

Do the following: Go down to your local parts store and purchase a new serpentine belt and a can of carb cleaner (or brake clean). Take the old belt off and throw it in the garbage. It's useless now that it has a lubricant sprayed on it. Take the carb cleaner and some paper towels and thoroughly clean all of the pulleys where the belt made contact. Install ...


1

Could be a bad wheel bearing. Easy to check. Just jack the front of the car up getting the front tire completely off the ground and shake/rock it ( top to bottom not side to side) If it has play in it its a good chance its going or already gone bad. Also if the tread on the tire is more substantially worn than the other side than thats another indication of ...


1

That sounds to me like a brake pad moving around on the caliper. This typically happens when with excessive or uneven wear, or damaged components. Hard to know for sure just from a recording. The caliper or pads could be rusted and stuck in place. My advice to you is to inspect the brakes. Don't take any chances when it comes to the ability of your vehicle ...


1

When (un)mounting wheels people sometimes touch the dust shield(?) (the one from this question), bending it out of shape a little. The piece may subsequently touch the inner part of the rim slightly causing a metallic, grinding sound. Check the inner part of the rims for any signs of scrapings and/or try to bend the shield a little in one direction or the ...


1

If the noise is independent of engine rpm or vehicle speed it is not directly connected to the engine, the transmission nor drive train. I suppose some electrical/hydraulic driven pump/actuator, since that would be the only thing that maintains the same rpm/frequency independent of engine or vehicle speed. Due to the lack of alternatives i think this could ...


1

Did you check all the pulleys before installing the new belt, to check that one of them isn't close to seizing? (water pump, especially). If everything turns freely, I'd suspect that the belt wasn't tensioned correctly; you don't want it too tight or too loose.


1

You could start by changing the serpentine belt. Your Windstar has a self adjusting tensioner, so it could be this also, but there's no way to adjust it independently of changing it. You can check to see if it's doing it's job by running the engine and seeing if the belt has a lot of flop (not sure how to describe this) when you rev then quickly release the ...


1

Dealer (OEM) vs aftermarket parts has always been a big debate. To answer this depends on the part and the manufacture. Some manufacturers make parts for the auto manufactures. When it comes to belts, Gates is a huge supplier to both OEM and aftermarket. Aftermarket parts are less expensive and are supposed to be made to OEM specs. Technically, you should ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible