14

It's all to do with gearing and matching the optimum rotational speed of the engine with the wheels (put simply). Imagine you have an engine which develops it's peak power between 3500RPM and 5000RPM. Now imagine that vehicle isn't equipped with any gears. At 60mph, a roadwheel and tyre that is around 2ft in diameter is rotating at around 840RPM. ...


14

Belt vs Chain in Motorcycles It's difficult to say which one is better. Depending on the application, one can be better or not in the particular role. High horsepower applications are not the place of belts and low maintenance is not the place for chains. Applications vary and one is not necessarily better than the other overall. The role of the final ...


7

Here are some reasons why some manufacturers use belts. Smoothness of the drive: The belt has the quality of putting down the torque of the engine much more smoothly and gradually than the chain counterpart, in a belt driven motorcycle you wont feel the sudden TUG when you twist the throttle.(This is the reason usually cruisers have this design and not the ...


5

No, you do not need to remap your ECU This doesn't have anything to do with your air fuel ration and ignition timing. You are simply changing the gear ratio for your final drive. Making the sprocket larger will make all of your gears a bit shorter and reduce your top end speed. I typically do this on most of my motorcycles as it makes for better city ...


5

It all has to do with the distance traveled for 1 input revolution. On a bike, there are 3 factors. The front gear, the back gear, and the tire diameter. The ratio of teeth on the rear gear to the number of teeth on the front gear is the gear ratio. If the front gear is larger, the wheel will spin more than 1 revolution per input revolution. If the ...


4

The number of teeth in a sprocket is constrained by the radius of the sprocket. Assuming a standard link distance (for bicycle chain) of 1/2 inch, the radius is some number based on n where n is an integer multiple of 1/2 inch lengths. Since circumference is 2*pi*r, the relationship 1/2*n = 2*pi*r must hold. Solving for r, r = 1/4 * n / pi. Thus for the ...


4

Changing your rear sprocket won't give you more mid range or change the engine power curve in any way. It will alter the torque at the rear wheel at all RPMs. The bike should accelerate faster through the gears but you will also loose out on top speed. You don't need to get dyno tuned just for changing a sprocket. He may however have been implying that to ...


3

This is more additional points to the above (good) answers. With cost per mile it probably depends a lot on the OE parts prices. With the old Kawasaki belt system used in the 1980s they lasted maybe 50% longer, but failed with little or no warning and cost a LOT more to replace (plus the far greater labour to change them). Belt life on Buells does not seem ...


1

You cannot actually tighten it to the shaft, those 2 bolts just hold the retainer plate, this is all that keeps the sprocket from coming off. Once the plate is removed you can slide the sprocket off of the output shaft. Sprocket and output shaft are machined for a tight slip fit, so if there is play either the sprocket is worn, the output shaft is worn or ...


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