4

That's a funny way to remind you that two tweeters - possibly out of phase - could result in a sound you're not happy with. Note this warning is specific to the channel (FL, FR, RL, RR) you're working in. If there are no rear tweeters then you're good. If there are rear tweeters you will definitely want to do two things Disconnect the factory tweeters ...


3

The speakers aren't going to be your problem; putting higher powered speakers in won't actually make them any louder (it just allows them to handle more powerful inputs). Putting more sensitive speakers in would work to a point, but only if you know the sensitivity of the existing speakers, and can be expensive for a minimal improvement. Ideally, you should ...


3

@Paulster suggested surface mount speakers - these would work well but the sound quality isn't going to be as good as normal speakers. Parcel shelfs tend to be made of compressed fibre now which is flexible and flimsy for speaker applications. In the past I have made a parcel shelf out of 12-18mm thick High Density Fibreboard and reinforced it with a cross ...


3

The measurement is the distance between the mounting holes. I suspect you have 6x4 which is the size used across many older Volkswagen and Porsche cars. You can confirm this by measuring the distance between the mounting holes, not the diameter of the speaker aperture. There are a range of 6x4 speakers available from a number of manufacturers so you ...


3

After doing some research on muddy bass, I discovered this is mainly due to the ANC (Active Sound Cancelation) cancelling out the bass from the speakers. Apparently the good engineers at Honda aren't able to figure out how not to cancel out the bass from the sound system. And there is no provision to turn ANC off. I found several recommendations suggesting ...


3

It's probably the terrible stock speakers. Upgrade your speakers or put in a subwoofer if you want bass.


2

So I did some digging and managed to find a PDF of the entire wiring diagram for the 2014. I'll post a OneDrive link below for anyone who wants to download them. They also contain dashboard disassembly instructions and whatnot. Amp Location: Right side of trunk. If you have the amp, it seems that the speaker wires are the same colors there as in the front ...


2

Most manufacturers tend to be fairly consistent with their stereo wiring, so it ought to be the same as other modern Fords. A quick googling reveals This site, which suggests the following: Power Memory (+12v Constant) Green Yellow Ignition (+12v Switched) Yellow/Black Ground (-) Black or Fat Red Illumination Orange ...


2

The "default" speakers in your car should be bi-wired ones. The 6-speaker layout in your car should have 2 speakers in the front, 2 tweeters in the front and 2 speakers in the back. The speakers in the back of your car should only have 2 strands each. The 4 strands of the connector on the front speakers are composed of two strands for LF - low frequency (the ...


2

The easiest way to check the speaker is to hook it up to another source. I would bet a capacitor blew in the head unit, but that is dependent upon where you heard the pop come from. I'll still give you 10 to 1 that the head unit is actually fried, unless you have an amp (which you may or may not know about). A lot of Fords I've seen come with amps. The ...


2

You want a line-out converter. You need rca pre-amp outputs, but your factory radio doesn't have them. You can tap into the speaker connection at the speaker closest to where you will install the amp to put in your line-out converter. This will provide you with an rca source for your amp. Then wire your amp and subs as usual. There's no reason to mess around ...


2

Speaker cables are simple two-wire cables: There's a flexible rubber hose between the door and the door frame. You'll have to run a cable through this hose, then down the pillar to the sill, through the sill and the dashboard to get to the radio. This involves removing the trim panels from the sill and the pillar, the kick panel (that's the panel ...


2

Car speakers typically come with speaker wire in the box. From memory, I believe that an '03 Polo will be 6.5" diameter round speakers so order a set in that size. You can run the wiring through the little rubber bellows that the central locking loom goes into. From there, you'll be in the B-pillar. If you remove the plastic trim from the B-pillar you ...


2

When you are playing music at low volume the voltage into the speakers is low .This low voltage means that any dirt or corrosion will stop the sound from coming through .A higher voltage will sometimes be enough to microweld the bad contact .This was well known in telephone engineering circles even in the 1800s .DC was and still is placed ...


2

On our '07 Cobalt, (1) I have the same non-canceling turn signal problem. I believe it's a mechanical issue. This guy says he has a fix, and an explanation. (Long, lots of pix, I'm not going to quote it ... so, -1 for me.) (Additional info: Something I read (the owner's manual?) suggested Chevy had tricked up the switch, so it won't cancel on lane ...


2

These connectors often have a tab that "clicks" into place and prevents them from working loose. There are various designs, but usually there is some part that you press down or prize up to release them. The easiest way to see how they work is to take note of what happens when you plug them together, but that isn't very helpful advice when your first task ...


1

In almost all cars inner part of the door isn't sealed from the outside. When rain falls water gets to the glass, then goes down and enters inner part of the door and then all the way down and through the drain holes it goes out of the door (btw if these drain holes are clogged with some dirt water keeps inside the door for some time and causes corrosion). ...


1

Lower the gain on the factory amp if you can, might also check and see if your headunit has a loudness setting. If all else fails you may just need to bypass the factory amp.


1

Verify that you actually have speakers in the car. If the previous owner upgraded the speakers, he may have removed them before selling you the car. Make sure the speakers are connected. You pulled the stereo to verify there are speaker wires plugged into the back of it, check the other end. Check the settings on the stereo (balance and fade): the stereo may ...


1

Re-pair your phone with your car Goto your phone and delete your car as an audio device. Goto your car stereo and delete your phone as a source device. Re-pair your phone and your car and see what happens. Seems to be an effective fix for me when I occasionally encounter this issue.


1

I checked out the owner's manual on both units. The primary thing that I noticed was they said "Do not put any conductive near the RCA plugs as it will cause a short circuit" The RCA plugs are already grounded internally to the audio circuitry (a floating ground or audio signal ground-I believe is the technical term) as opposed to a power supply ground. The ...


1

Sounds like a typical weak ground issue. Check the engine to frame/fender ground as well as the gauge of the wire used for your amp (if it's an external amp run directly to the battery). If you added an amp and wired power to the fuse box,(other than the switched power to turn on the amp) run it directly to the battery instead. Noise suppression filter is ...


1

There are switches available for swapping between sets of speakers : check out the HiFi world - you can use these to switch between two head units. Depending on the type of switch you may be able to switch only the supply from either head unit and common the relevant returns. However, if both head units are powered then you may have interference issues.


1

There are several factors that inform the choice for a 50W rating instead of 20W. People who install aftermarket speakers may be likely to also install an amplifier. Those amplifiers can generally deliver much more power than the 18 W a headunit is limited to. If you were to design your aftermarket speaker to have an 18 W RMS limit, you'd miss out on that ...


1

The answer has to do with the available power supply. I'm sorry if the answer becomes too technical. A head unit uses the voltage supplied by the car, for the sake of argument lets say 12v. The head unit then turns that supply into a split supply (plus and minus 12V) because that is what speakers need to make sound. The maximum power to the speaker then is ...


1

Also, you can get some speaker wire directly from the radio to the speaker - if it works fine one possibility is the speaker wiring is damaged in the joint between car body and door.


1

Double check all your vehicles ground points, including engine/alternator, stereo head, amp antenna etc for bad grounds. Here's a link that will help... http://www.crutchfield.com/S-o2oP9lxwr8F/learn/learningcenter/car/noise_suppressors_installation_guide.html


1

The tl;dr; answer? No. While there are potential external speaker options, they will not sync up to your existing stereo, so issues of placement would probably negate any of the gains from them. None of the small bluetooth speakers which would actually fit on your dash are going to provide any clarity at the volumes you need to overcome road noise while ...


1

The key thing you need to know is the impedance (measured in ohms) of the speaker - you might have to hunt for the model number if it doesn't mention it anywhere. Look for a number with a Greek Omega after it - likely to be somewhere around 4 or 8... The new speaker will have to have the same impedance as the one you're removing, to balance the one on the ...


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