31

Yes, but personally, I wouldn't risk it. The only time I've ever needed my spare was [cue spooky music] on a dark, stormy night, on a two lane highway through a dense forest. I was doing ~50 mph when I hit a pothole with front passenger tire. The tire didn't go flat immediately, but I could tell something was wrong, and was able to limp another 1/4ish mile ...


21

Do you carry a toolset, lights, spare belts and hoses, and OBD-II decoder and electrical patch cables? If not, then you're not taking on much more risk by leaving the spare at home, provided you keep an eye on tire pressure, you drive on ordinary roads, and your tires are nowhere near their end of life. Spare tires are common because, for most of the 20th ...


18

First, the critical caveat: You are the driver. You have to make the decision. It ultimately doesn't matter what we say. Given, that, I would say NO, it is not safe to drive until the weekend. Get the broken tire fixed or replaced as soon as possible. You have two problems: Top speed limitation: the donut is top-speed rated for 50 mph (check the ...


12

No, they're not. My first flat ever shredded the tire before I could bring the vehicle to a stop. Those things could save you hundreds of dollars but leave you stranded where there is no help when you need it most.


10

I found a response to your question on Popular Mechanics website. I think it gives some pretty good reasoning: First, a temporary spare isn't as durable as a normal tire. The real strength of a tire comes from the plies—layers of steel and polyester underneath the rubber—and spares don't have as many plies as regular tires. A typical space-saver spare has ...


6

A lot of this really depends on your driving habits, location, coverage, and how much you care about being inconvenienced. In your particular circumstances, as I'm (perhaps incorrectly) understanding them, you'll probably be fine. Leave the spare at home 99% of the time, but remember to bring it with you if you're going somewhere you might be out of cell ...


5

Having recently had the pleasure of the company of an AA Rescue Patrolman for a couple of hours. This is after picking up a hole in the sidewall that the can of gloop couldn't seal. I was on the hard shoulder of the M1 Motorway with 44-tonners hurtling past at 60mph. I would say keep the spare wheel. The patrolman said that he has to rescue two or three ...


5

And, to just add my two bits, make sure that donut spare is properly inflated while you're driving on it! Most spares have a much higher inflation pressure that people do not know about. The spare on my Accord has a max. pressure of 60 PSI. And to significantly decrease the chances of your tire exploding, or wearing poorly, you should have it up around 45-...


4

TireRack indicates that there may be other differences at play. Full-Size Temporary Spares Full-size temporary spare tires and wheels match the vehicle's original tire dimensions, but typically feature lighter-weight construction and a shallower tread depth to reduce vehicle weight to improve fuel economy and make the spare easier to install. While ...


4

As pointed out by @JuannStrauss, a spare tyre that is stored inboard of the vehicle will degrade more slowly over time than one of the regular wheels since it is not exposed to: normal wear & tear from vehicle motion other physical aggression (hitting a curb) winter salt heating in summer UV light All of these dry out the tyre composants and degrade ...


4

I have a 2003 Mini Cooper S that didn't come with a spare tire, the battery was relocated by the factory to the trunk to make room for the supercharger. It did originally came with run flat tires, but like many others I choose to run conventional tires. Hence I carry a homemade kit similar to this. It's fine for small punctures from a nail, but wouldn't ...


4

What you've got there is what we call a plus zero tire size. The tire is wider than stock but fits on the original wheel without changing the outer circumference very much. Is there a huge difference between the tires that are on there and the tires that are supposed to be on there? Will there be a problem if I get another flat and say, have to drive 300 ...


4

There is not a significant difference in circumference and that's what you need to worry about with your spare. I believe the size you have is for the original, full-sized spare. If you look at the numbers, the 245 denotes the width in mm. The 75 denotes the aspect ratio, or the size of the side wall as compared to the width of the tire. Mathematically, that ...


4

In the 45 years I've been driving, most of which were on the poorly maintained streets of Hawaii, I've had only one flat that could not have been fixed by a plug kit (and even that one was my fault). So no, I don't consider a spare an absolute necessity. Even in cars that did have a spare, I felt it was easier to use a plug kit than to change a tire (US ...


3

My car has no spare wheel, but has comes with a repair kit and built-in inflation kit. I've decided it's not worth the cost of acquiring a spare wheel, based on: Likelihood of a puncture (at all) is low on decent tyres I have roadside assistance if needed Chances are quite high that an unfixable puncture would occur when changing a wheel couldn't happen ...


3

There is a huge pile of information about tire sizing around the internet. I'll attempt to summarize its application here. Tires have 3 numbers, which work together to describe the tire's size. The first number is the section width, the second number is the sidewall ratio and the third number is the rim diameter. Section Width The section width is the ...


3

If your spare is a full size tire then there's no reason you can't use it longer term as long as it's in good shape. Over time the rubber compounds will break down and you'll get sidewall cracks which weaken the tire to the point it isn't safe. If it's 4 years old it should be fine. You have to keep in mind that you won't have a spare though, if you get a ...


3

The very short answer is this: for a gas at constant temperature, the product of pressure and volume is constant. This is the ideal gas law - close enough for this purpose. When you load a tire, it flattens a tiny bit. Compared to the total volume, you lose just a sliver. Because the volume is virtually unchanged, the pressure stays the same. Now when you ...


2

Here is a picture, if this is what you are asking. I'm not exactly sure what you are asking... where do you store the spare tire? Where I assume you found it:


2

It is called "jack pad" which is used in elevating the car when changing tire or other mechanical inspections. It's attached under the car (somewhere around the side edge of the chassis). https://www.google.com/search?q=jack+pad+mercedes+2009+ml350&oq=jack+pad+mercedes+2009+ml350&aqs=chrome..69i57.238j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8


2

There are several patterns of rotation for vehicles. When a vehicle has a space saver spare then patterns of side to side, cross or front to rear are applicable. As you have a full size spare then that can be included in the rotation and is what I would consider normal. See The patterns for all these with details can be found here : Tire swapping ...


1

It is extremely unlikely that you caused any damage whatsoever in the three miles you drove. Basically, there are a couple little gears that don't normally spin except when you go around corners. When the tires are different sizes they spin all the time. Three miles isn't enough to cause these gears abnormal wear, especially if you weren't driving it hard....


1

Not likely, where you going to but the valve for the inner tube? Also why would you depend your life and 3-4k pounds of metal on something that wasn't designed to do so? Go get a $5 spare from the junker if your trying to save money


1

If the axles are not driven then there is no real issue of having a part-worn in front or behind a full one. The problem comes when the axle is driven - specially with some 4wd - as the differentials need to allow for different rolling differences due to corners.


1

tl dr: Don't use anything but the proper lug pattern/size. The biggest problem with using a lug pattern which doesn't match exactly is you will most likely never get the wheel to align correctly. It will almost always be off center. The reason? The lug holes are sized to be centered exactly on the lugs themselves (seems obvious, right?). When the lug ...


1

Personally I would say don't use it - but get it checked by a competent shop / garage they will tell you for sure. I would consider going to the breakers / scrap yards and find the same car and source a good one that way and have it checked of course with your own tyre.


1

For anyone interested... This is what we ended up doing...


1

The 1997 Suburban takes a load D or E rated tire. I'd bet you got the same size tires, but with a lighter load rating (WEAKER TIRES) then the suburban requires, hence the lower max tire pressure. For a load E 10 ply usually the maximum pressure is 80 psi, and for a load D my guess would be 60-65. They put the wrong load tires on your car, so you should ...


1

In regards to your tire pressure, I would not suggest exceeding the recommended maximum tire pressure for your specific tire. That being said, the tire won't explode the moment it is inflated over 44 PSI, but it could cause unnecessary and possibly dangerous wear to the tire over time. Your car is heavy, so having your tire pressure as close to the ...


1

It will degrade over time, but at a much slower rate because it's not exposed to the elements like the other four are.


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