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The smart keys wait until they hear a ping from a low frequency transmitter in the door handle or in the car ignition. Once the key hears a ping, it will respond at a different frequency with it's secure code. Because the low frequency transmitters are used in several spots on the car, the location of the key can be tracked with signal strength alone. The ...


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It sounds as though you just want to cut out the "black box" and try to make this work. If so, you are sadly out of luck. If it were that easy on any system which uses a security system, a lot more vehicles would get stolen on a regular basis. In most vehicle security systems, the "black box" verifies the identity of the chip in the key, then sends a "start" ...


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I found this information on a Toyota forum. It is from Toyota TSB dated November 9, 2007 (TSB#EL009-07). It works with a lot of different Toyota models for 2007-2008 and may work for yours as well. (NOTE: If it doesn't work, let me know and I'll delete this answer). It appears fairly complicated and time critical (time during/between steps needs to be done ...


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The short answer is you can't. A new key needs to be purchased and programmed at the dealer. There is no simple way around this.


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The only way to do this is to have the keys programmed to the car. The only way to do that is to take it to the dealership. They have the necessary tools which are proprietary. Only they have them. Yes, it's a racket.


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I suspect the key has lost its "sync" to the diversity module. You can take the module apart (like you already have), and scrub it clean with high strength isopropyl, or even good vodka (but I feel this a waste.) I know you said it was only dusty, but a good clean won't hurt anything. Beyond that, it's a dealer-only effort. This is coded RFID Bavarian ...


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I have just had a Mercedes Key that would not unlock the doors but would start the Vehicle. So I sent it to a specialist car key doctor This is what he found. Check out Mercedes Smart Key, find damaged casing and switches and bad connections. Remove all switches and fit 3 new switches, redo bad connections, fit 2 new batteries and test, key working but ...


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You need to take it to a Toyota dealership in your local area (if you have one) and see what they have to say. As you don't have the key any more (as opposed to it just being broken) you need to take it to the main dealer as they are likely the only ones that can do anything about it.


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One thing you also need to consider is that the outdoor locks of the car can be manually opened without the electronic system, using the mechanical key. This cannot be fixed without changing the mechanical locks. So I would advise you to not leave high-value possessions in your car if there's any chance whoever has the key could track you down. As for the ...


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All three points you make could be true. Any good automotive locksmith, electrician, dealer or diagnostic specialist will be able to disable any other keys that may be programmed to your car that you don't have in your possession. The only problem with this is that the car/ecu needs a minimum of two keys to be programmed so if you only have one you need to ...


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The key for your Corolla is called a "G-Chip" key. You can purchase the key online (just search for your year and "g-chip" ... ensure it has the fob built in). Unfortunately you would need a programmer to get the key attuned to your car. You'll need to find a locksmith who has a programmer, or you can take it to the dealership. Getting the key from online is ...


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I'm guessing that the "moisture" is actually the solvent in the adhesive, not water, and it is electrically conductive, so it blocks the radio signal from your key fob. The signal can only be transmitted through the windows, because the metal of the car body will block it. Test if you can lock and unlock the doors with a window open.


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It's very unlikely that anyone other than a Ford dealer can provide a chipped key that'll start the car. You may have to prove that you're the owner of the vehicle before they'll help with this. A subsequent comment says that some Ford Focus cars can be reprogrammed using PC software without dealer input. The OP will have to start talking to locksmiths or ...


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Not all cars do this. I have personal experience with a 2011 Dodge Journey which uses keyless entry. When I pull the handle with the keys on me, the door automatically unlocks and it opens. However, if I try to open the locked door with the keys inside of the car... it won't open. I'm not sure how that works, if the sensor is short range and only directed ...


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Sorry to say but you've probably fried the electronics in the key. If you haven't already I recommend taking the fob apart (i.e. removing the battery) and placing it in a bag of rice for 24-48 hours to ensure it is fully dried out, you can then reassemble with a fresh battery and attempt to reprogram the fob to the car, if this doesn't work then the fob is ...


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When you get your new key programmed for your Corolla (ref: this question), they can have any other keys programmed out of the vehicle. It has to be done with a special programmer.


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According to this source it's possible to program door lock/unlock with a $35 "blank" remote. The immobiliser part of it is unfortunately a bit more high tech (like you would hope). All you need to do is a set sequence with the ignition and remote to reprogram it. I'm not sure if the model's of the fit remote they are talking about and your 2011 are ...


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According to this website: There is no onboard programming procedure for this vehicle. This vehicle requires special equipment be connected to the vehicle to program the keyless remote. Try a locksmith before the dealership, they are usually 50% the cost. You'll have to purchase a replacement key/fob (or two) and then take it somewhere to have it ...


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No, there is no relatively cheap way. There ARE ways, but they're definitely not cheap. My car has a similar key to yours and the best price I was quoted was ZAR 1600, which translates to 100 Pounds or $160. You may get away with having a spare key made without the electronic transponder. That should be much cheaper, but you won't be able to remote lock or ...


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