Hot answers tagged

19

If it has been driving fine since then, all you have probably done is worn the brake pads down. Not fatal - but check when you pull the handbrake on that it is solidly holding the car stationary. If you notice vibration, then I'd worry about pads/disks being warped or damaged. You may find though that you need the handbrake cable to be tightened, as it may ...


9

1) Parking brakes only engage the rear brakes, so your front brakes (which provide the majority of stopping power) are 100% fine. 2) On a car with rear drum brakes, which I believe your car has: The parking brake is simply a cable you pull which puts mechanical pressure on your rear brakes that your brake pedal hydraulic system normally would. However, the ...


9

Your car will be fine; any issues would have shown up by now. "My indication lights dont work so I didnt see any red light on my dash" For me, this is more scary/important. It's not hard to fix the bulbs - about an hour max for a mechanic - and essential for safety.


7

Your window motor and/or regulator is going out. What happens is, the window motors have a thermal trip which tells them to stop when they get too hot. As a vehicle gets older, the window regulator and slides don't slide/move as well, so creates a lot more friction. The window motor starts wearing out because of this and more heat is produced, thus shutting ...


7

My experience with AC is limited to what I have been studying both in book and video form. From everything I'm reading you really do need to replace the receiver drier when you replace the compressor. This is due to the excess moisture allowed into the system as it's open for the repair. Also, if the compressor was damaged causing the need to replace it, ...


5

The bar will fit best with the suspension in it's normal rest position, i.e. if the car is sitting on it's wheels. As DucatiKiller says in his comment, the best method is to jack up the hubs (making sure to put the jacks under a solid casting, so they can't cause any damage to the brakes!) to simulate the normal position.


4

Things may have changed, but I had this happen to my '94 Toyota Pickup. It was a bad thermostat. On that model it was built into the radiator cap. Basically, it gets stuck open and takes longer for the engine to heat up enough to operate the heater. Cold engine test: Start the engine. Time how long it takes the engine to warm up enough to produce heat ...


4

Yes it is annoying but generally harmless and won't affect the life of the vehicle or accessories. However, the one exception to this is the windshield wipers. If the car is turned off while they are in mid-wipe, they won't be at their "park" position. Even this is generally harmless, unless you live in an area where the wipers might freeze to the ...


4

Yes, the blue smoke is most likely the engine burning oil. When the oil burning only happens upon startup, this is usually a sign the valve seals are no longer doing their job. Oil bypasses them as the engine sits and runs down the valve stem to sit on top of the valve, to then be sucked into the cylinder upon startup. As the oil is burned off, the smoke ...


4

Safe to drive, probably, but it might be hard on your new tires. Seized tie rod may mean only that they were unable to adjust the position of the stop nut and/or outer tie rod end on the threaded shaft of the inner tie rod end. This adjustment is necessary to complete a front-end or 4-wheel alignment. However since you said it was hard to steer, it might ...


4

Try cleaning it as much as possible possible. After cleaning it I suggest you to check your oil levels daily. And once a few days or check the spot if more oil appears there. If more oil appears at the spot and your oil levels go down quickly you have a problem.


3

It sounds like the shutting mechanism for the door is not quite getting the door closed, or maybe the switch which tells the door closer to do its thing is broke. As @NateEldredge says, get the battery recharged completely and investigate further. Once it's recharged, try to open and close the door from the side the noise is coming from (assuming it has two ...


3

Here's the method if you don't have a scan tool. Note this is for a brand new key & ECM. Ensure SECURITY indicator light is flashing. SECURITY indicator is located on left side of instrument panel. Insert ignition key into ignition lock cylinder. Note that SECURITY indicator light should now remain on steady. Once ignition key registration is under ...


3

Same problem, fixed it, details below. Toyota Sienna 2001 XLE. Issue: Key doesn't turn. Problem: Some of the tumblers in Toyota's ignition lock cylinder are split. These split tumblers don't go down when they should. For vid description, see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bxxwk9l9X9g Possible fix: Buy a new cylinder. However, if you have chip'd keys (...


3

Sounds like an electrical wiring sequence problem. As such, being in a minor system like A/C, there's probably no damage being done to the system by having it wired as it is. The ideal, of course, would be to take out the systems and re-wire them as they should be wired. However, you're not risking blowing something up or anything by leaving it as it is.


3

As long as the bearings etc were kept clean and everything was in the same position from where it came, you should be fine.. The only thing that may occur if the bearings or cup have rotated before refitting is perhaps premature wear of the joint, as the bearings will now be wearing in a different manner to their previous wear pattern. I wouldn't worry too ...


2

Apparently you simply cannot unlock it. If you hunt around on forums, you'll see it was, and still is, a pretty big discussion topic. For example, from this discussion about the 2011 model (product links removed): jsrober writes: Yes, that topic has been discussed to death. Just about everyone hated that "lockout" feature in Toyota's GPS system... ...


2

I would like to take this time to share my thoughts in regard to the problem I've had with the 2000 Sienna. I've resently changed the drivers side motor that had the same problem. Only to have a problem a month later. My problem was not my motor but instead it was due to the Increase friction. Also the thermal fuse that is internal becomes very hot ...


2

What I've found in several of these is that the motor itself is fine, but it's internal thermal fuse goes bad (becomes higher resistance giving less voltage to the motor). I've even replaced the thermal fuse for a couple bucks and the motors then work like new. I wouldn't recommend doing this unless you are familiar with soldering and electronics.


2

Considering your comments, my suggestion to you is to replace the assembly. If you still have the pins, you could possible repair the assemply by using some (possibly) super glue or maybe even some epoxy. This approach, while cheaper, will never be as strong as new, as well as it may not align correctly once completed. As a cost saving approach in lieu of ...


2

It is more than likely not the sensor. The problem lies in the circuit which goes to the sensor. Replacing the sensor is probably the last thing I'd do in this case. In this case, I believe it is only a single wire you'd need to trace. It could also be the connector/connection at the sensor itself. In either case, it looks as though the intake manifold ...


2

After a visit to the mechanic this turned out to be due to a cracked radiator. That caused coolant leak which led to heater not working. Will replace radiator. Check engine light that came on seems unrelated to this issue.


2

I'd try a different front end shop and have it re-aligned. The steer return rate is affected by the caster and camber adjustments of the front end and by caster and camber that is the forward trajectory ( Caster ) and the side to side ( camber ) settings on the front wheels. Maybe you just got a bad front-end man. If the problem isn't too bothersome I'd ...


2

The simple answer is that it makes no difference. No damage will be caused. No extra maintenance. In fact you will probably find that the majority of people do exactly what this person does. Doing it like that ensures that everything comes back on just as you left it. The power buttons are there for a reason, to allow you to choose what is on and off ...


2

The ignition key is a quite complex switch mechanism and automotive manufactures design it that way to fool proof the system. Switching off the ignition (to the point of taking the key out) will disconnect the battery from all non-essential equipment in the car (essentials being the clock, alarm system etc.). Hence, there is no damage that really occurs. ...


2

I think your looking at the procedure for a rear o2s b1s1 is an AFR sensor and is mounted on the firewall side manifold. I'd also suggest you do or have some diagnostics done before you replace the sensor. AFR sensors are not cheap and you may find yourself throwing a few hundred dollars down the drain. Check fuel trims. Check for vacuum and exhaust ...


2

If you greased the spring and sides as normal, the only other "trick" that I have found that may work is to gently bevel the pad leading edge so it is not square.


2

I'm just posting in that event that someone else might be helped. The misfire condition was due to two bad coil packs. I don't know how the shops I brought it to missed that and myself, but that is what I turned out to be. What threw me off was that the new coil pack I purchased was also bad, so swapping that around with the other bad ones did nothing. ...


2

Stuff happens First, it's important to remember that stuff happens. No matter how well you plan or prepare, unexpected problems can occur ranging from minor (nail in tire) to major (catastrophic engine failure). But you already know that, and you are intelligently planning to take reasonable steps to plan for and/or avoid foreseeable problems. With that ...


2

The age and mileage of a vehicle are not great indicators as to it's fitness for a long trip. It's all about the condition of the individual vehicle. A well maintained high mileage vehicle is better than a neglected low mileage one. Anecdote alert: I drove a 1986 Dodge van from Toronto to San Francisco, north to Victoria and back to Toronto in 2014, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible