40

This tire was driven on long after the blowout When there is sidewall separation from tread carcass like this it had to have been driven on longer than claimed. When a tire suffers pressure loss and the car compresses what's left of the tire there's a fold along the sidewall that, if driven on, heats up due to the bending and associated friction. Once the ...


26

The "wires" you mention are likely the tire cords - essentially bands of steel wire that are major structural elements of the tire's construction. If they are exposed this is an indicator of imminent failure and the tire is dangerous to be used. If the cords are showing through the sidewall: DO NOT drive the vehicle with that tire on! DO Get the tire ...


22

Sidewall damage is a serious issue. Sidewall is the structural part of the tire, and damage to it can result in dangerous consequences. Replace your tire immediately. If you know how to put the spare tire on (and there is a spare tire in your car), please do it now, and drive only to the tire shop. Spare tires are not designed for extended drives, so don't ...


21

The damage you are showing is minor cosmetic damage. If the following occurs with sidewall damage, then get it replaced: Tire deflation (cannot be legally repaired in most countries) You pull the flap back and see damage to the side wall plies (corded area under the rubber which supports the tire) whether deflation has occurred or not Bulging of the tire ...


19

Why doesn't your friend believe his wife? The tire probably blew up when it hit a pothole or curb. She drove without noticing until it started to pull to the side. Probably a little while until she found a safe place to park. What's so unbelievable about the above scenario? You and your friend should chill out and be happy that she is OK. Blow outs can kill ...


18

From the look of the rim, it seems it may have been in contact with something ... that something may have been a curb or two. If so, this could have weakened the side wall, which caused catastrophic failure. Given other factors, like if the tire was low on pressure and was continued to be driven on, then this to could have exacerbated the situation. Hot road/...


14

If you can't see or feel the cords by lifting the edge of the cut with a blunt instrument (e.g. a coffee stirrer), then it shouldn't fail: any ply or cord that can be seen without touching the tyre – fail if by folding back rubber or opening a cut with a blunt instrument, so as not to cause further damage, exposed ply or cord can be seen irrespective of ...


12

No, it cannot. In fact, in the United States it is illegal for a tire shop to repair a tire which has side wall damage. The reason for this is because the integrity of the tire itself is compromised with side wall damage. Now, I'm not saying it could not be fixed per se (a simple patch could probably do it), but would you want to risk your safety or that of ...


11

If you look at more than just the sidewall, you'll notice the tread shoulder is heavily worn. This tire is well beyond 3/32 and verging on bald in most of the tread pattern. There is slight cupping that indicates habitual under inflation by 3-6 pounds. Another factor is that it looks like a lower profile tire (though hard to tell for sure from this angle), ...


11

I've had the wall separate like that after a blow-out, just in the time needed to stop. My impression is that the rim sliced it as it drove flat. So, it doesn't take a "long time". Just going from freeway speed to stopping at the roadside is time and distance enough.


11

If the tire is holding air, you should be safe enough to take it to the tire shop to get it replaced, but replacement is exactly what you should do. The damage on the tire is of enough severity there's nothing else you can do with it. Feel happy in the fact you didn't have a blowout on the tire, especially while going downhill, as this could have caused ...


10

I have only seen wear like that in tires that are around 10 years old. What does the date code say? Have you ever let a rubber-band sit for years? You are risking tread separation by driving them like this. If you can afford the tires you should replace them. An accident at high speed will cost you more than the tires.


10

Replace for sure. The sidewall is the most vulnerable part of the tire. The tire might be holding air for now, and you might be able to drive on it for a while, but it could "pop" at any time creating a very dangerous situation. Put the spare on immediately - don't risk a blow-out.


10

I'm guessing that these are BMW spec runflat tyres? This isn't the first time I've seen such damage. Apparently, because they are intended to be used in an emergency without pressure, the sidewalls are thickened / reinforced. This basically means that they are made from several layers which delaminate with apparent regularity. You may want to get the expert ...


10

Long answer: As @David said, absolutely, change the tire immediately. In view of the age of the tires, unless they were spectacular tires to begin with, they are probably all due for replacement. If you do not feel this is necessary, at least replace the other tire on the same axle. The risk with a tire that is this damaged is that it will burst a huge ...


9

although JPhi is right in what he says, he's also slightly wrong. If you have taken a chunk out of your sidewall it's not necessarily dangerous in the slightest, it only becomes dangerous when you can see the cords because that is what can cause the tyre to bulge and blow out. it is worth checking for any bulging after a 100 miles or so but if it's a part ...


8

Depends on locale, in the UK that tyre is damaged so badly that it would be illegal and if stopped you would accumulate points on your license for it. A tyre must not have a cut or tear in excess of 25mm or 10% of the sectional width of the tyre, whichever is the greater, and which is deep enough to reach the ply or cord. In that third picture you can ...


8

Yes, replace the tire immediately. I'd recommend replacing both tires on that axle, but not all four unless they are as bald as that one appears to be. Despite what tire shops will tell you, it isn't necessary to replace all four tires at a time. However, if you have one old / low tread tire and one new tire paired up (both fronts or both rears) you can ...


7

Yes.. It needs to be replaced as it is not safe. It would also fail an MOT like that. It might not fail today or even next month etc, but you couldn't trust that tyre. Under heavy loads like cornering, braking or at speed etc that tyre already has a real weak point, and failure under those conditions could easily end in disaster. Its not worth it. The ...


7

That should be replaced and really soon - don't go on a freeway / motorway with it like that, as it looks deep. Even running around town it should be replaced asap...


7

You will need to replace the tyre. Sidewall damage is not repairable.


6

Short answer, yes. Long answer...Yes


6

Sidewall damage is almost unrepairable. If it is indeed damage to the steel belts, the tire will fail violently (instantly) soon in the future. That's a good reason not to be trying to change it on the car, because that involves a lot of direct handling of the tire. Tires can blow from handling/maintenance, and do hurt people handling them; that's why ...


6

There seems to be metal poking out of the cut, although it could be a trick of the light in the picture. If it is metal then the metal sidewall reinforcement is damaged and the tire's integrity is compromised, in which case you should replace it right away. From other angles it looks like the glint is from some sort of wire buried to give the tire a ...


6

The tire died of old age. He gave his life for the safety of the vehicles driver. Snark aside: Judging from the cracks that tire must be long overdue. Your friend can consider himself lucky. Should the blowout happened during a fast drive the consequences would have been serious. But please, tell you friend to inspect the remaining tires and replace them if ...


5

For your safety and others . Please change the tire. I had the same size bump on my run flats . Tires with less than 1k . Don't risk the lives of others to save a few bucks. It will cost you more down the road ... No pun intended.


5

From the looks of it, these are only superficial scores in the rubber on the side wall. If there isn't any threads showing in from the sidewall and they don't leak air, they are probably just fine. If you don't like the idea of them, by all means replace them. I don't think I'd be nervous about driving them from what you've shown us.


5

If you decide to keep driving on this tire, don't use superglue on that rubber flap. When superglue sets it becomes rigid and brittle. The tire will flex a bit when you drive, and break the glue bond in a short time. Instead, use the rubber glue from a bike tire puncture repair kit.


5

Only thing I can think of is that the sidewall was destroyed by a curb at just the wrong height, or something similar. You would have to be fairly oblivious to not notice that the drivers side rear of the car was no longer on a tire, but rater on the sidewall. I would guess it was something faster, like a sewer drain lip, curb, something that dug into the ...


5

It looks cosmetic to me especially since the gash isn't very deep. The length of the gash doesn't look very concerning since there appears to be plenty of material left underneath the gash. You also stated that it has held air fine over the past year plus, so I would think you'd be fine. If it really bothers you, it wouldn't be a bad idea to just replace the ...


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