16

Yes, you need to replace both shocks at the same time. One new shock can (and will) have an adverse effect on the handling and thus safety. A new shock has different damping characteristics as the old one and it can lead to weird steering behaviour, loss of grip on one wheel, etc.


11

Definitely replace them in pairs, depending on the wear of them you might even have to replace all four as combining worn shocks with new ones can (a) have very undesirable effects on the handling and (b) tends to accelerate wear on the already worn shocks, leading to even more (a).


10

A simple test that you can perform in your own driveway is: For each corner of the car, push down hard several times (the car should be bouncing visibly up and down) When pushed down, release and watch The car should bounce upwards (above the normal resting point) and then immediately settle at the resting point. Additional bouncing indicates worn or faulty ...


9

What is a shock absorber? I'm going to answer the basic title question with a carefully selected quote from the great Wikipedia: ... their intended sole purpose is to dampen spring oscillations. Think of how you want your car to ride when driving down a smooth road that has a bump or pothole. You expect to feel a mild jolt when the car travels over ...


9

Shocks/struts can either come charged with nitrogen (gas shock) or conventional (without a charge). Both can wear out over time. Shocks should be replaced around 50k miles under normal conditions. That really depends on how you drive your vehicle, though. If all of your driving is done on the freeways of Texas where the straights are longer than long, then ...


9

There should be no oil visible on the shocks. If you see oil that means they're not damping as they should be because the seals are compromised. They most certainly shouldn't be dripping, regardless of what the warranty company wants you to believe. I had a rear shock fail on my Lexus a few months ago and had it replaced under Toyota warranty. The ...


8

Overview In terms of rebuilding the shock, there are similarities between models but there are unique differences between them that make it impossible to review all of the nuance. I'll only give a high level response to the rebuilding component. Adjustment You asked. I can't figure out the low/high speed or the rebound/compression dampening. I'm ...


8

You should leave them just about snug, if not just a little loose. If you tighten them before you put it on the ground, when you do get the car on the ground, there will be tension on the parts, which means it will wear quicker. So, leave them a little loose, then tighten once on the ground ... there's no worries about safety when doing so. It's not like its ...


7

The question is can I just go out and buy any 17mm bolt that is the same length as the current one, No. or is there some kind of material requirement? Yes. Think about the jobs that those bolts are doing: they support the steady state mass of the vehicle and the transient spring loads of the transmission. That means that those bolts need to be ...


7

The late 60s to early 70s mustangs has shocks and springs on the upper control arms. Normally They are installed on the lower control arm to save space. By fitting them between the control arms the towers don't have to be as tall or the shock/spring could be mounted directly to the frame.


7

Do the knee test. Start at the front, since those shocks are assumed to be good, because they are new. Put your knee on the front bumper in one corner, put all your weight on it, then get off. Count the number of times the car bounces. Repeat with the other front corner. This gives you an idea what good shocks dampen like. Repeat at the back, if it bounces ...


6

You have a couple of simultaneous questions going on here: You have an older / non-new car. Should you have to replace the shocks? Shocks wear out over time and mileage. I'm going to be replacing the wife's shocks this weekend (assuming they arrive on schedule). The existing shocks have at least 50K miles on them so they're at the end of their expected ...


6

"Hand priming" or actuation is effectively worthless as a gauge on the performance of a Shock/Strut Assy. Only when severely damaged or out of service will the activity show any truly noticeable difference. And by priming the shock, you're effectively wasting your time. It will do so on its own. The reason why this "works" is occasionally air or gas may slip ...


5

The shock you have shown is called a "coil over shock absorber". The shock which is located in the center of the spring, functions just like any other shock absorber. It will most likely have hydraulic oil with baffles. It may or may not be gas charged. The shock casing is made stronger than a regular shock, mainly to support the spring. You'll also notice ...


5

Hand Priming Shocks of Various Dampeners/Struts is Urban Legend This myth has been perpetuated over time and has gained legs and therefore credibility. Yes, it's true that the gas and oil separate on the shelf lying horizontally. It's also true that they separate on the shelf if stored vertically, piston rod up or down. But it doesn't matter. These ...


5

Brake fluid and oil have a different chemical base Oil is a hydrocarbon and brake fluid is a silicon. They will not mix. Therefore, the fluid seals are designed with that in mind. Brake fluid would break down the seals in your shocks and ruin the seals. Additionally, beyond the issues above, brake fluid is not very viscous and you would have a very '...


4

As long as your cousin isn't using the bike for jumps and stunts, and is just riding it on roads this shouldn't pose a problem. As @Bob pointed out in the comment below - the spring is what takes the weight. The damper is what slows down the movement of the spring, preventing bouncing. If the shock bottoms out under his weight, then it may damage the ...


4

Brakes and suspension should always be done in pairs. If you REALLY don't care about the car, you could just replace the one, but it could lead to alignment/tire wear/vehicle stability issues down the road.


4

It depends vehicle specs, road conditions and driving habits. Shock absorbers are not carry the weight of the car, they are basically dampers. They restrict the amount of movement. In case of bump they compress and allow certain amount of resistance to slow down the movement. In rebound, basically the same function. So, without them, related wheel tend to ...


4

To answer your specific question, no, there are no technical impediments. That said, there are reasons why passive components are still used. Cost As you might have guessed, cost is potentially the biggest reason active suspensions are still uncommon. You mention some applications where cost is less important (it's never unimportant), but consider cost ...


4

First you should have replaced both front tyres together : braking stabilty water clearance etc As for a visual check of caster, camber and kpi then if you can see 0.5 or 1 degree of misalignment thats good going and any garage would save on buying expensive equipment. I suggest you get an expert to do a 4 way alignment to see what the issues are. Oh, and ...


3

This should be a relatively easy repair, as long as you have the tools to do it. The part you are looking for is called the sway bar (or stabilizer bar) bushings and links. You'll want to get a complete set of them (eight bushing halves, two link rods, two nuts, two sleeves and eight washers). As an example, you can get a set of these from RockAuto.com for ...


3

Too easy with a basic set of tools, a jack and jackstands. Let's start at the front. Jack the truck up and put it on jackstands, you'll need the jack to raise and lower the wheel which is why you need the jackstands. The shock bolts into two places, at the top in a 'shock-hoop' and at the bottom at the control arm. Unbolt the bolts from the control arm, ...


3

I have replaced the original Honda Shine suspension with a Gabriel. There are no significant differences in comfort. Gabriel price is 1100, Honda price 1800.


3

In order of precedence: Cam belt Ball joint boot Shock absorber No. 1 Priority: I'm not sure if the Peugeot has an interference motor, but will assume it does since most vehicles these days are built as interference motors. An interference motor is one where the pistons and valve train occupy the same space inside the engine, but at different times. The ...


3

The key assumption in the OP's question was that replacement in pairs was because if one failed then the other must be close. It's actually about making them the same. Unless the car has a tiny number of miles on it, the two struts will always be in different parts of their lives. That means the original one will always be more worn than the replacement ...


3

A shock absorber is supposed to be dry on the outside, leaking fluid (I suppose you mean that by grease?) is a sign of damage. The more hydraulic fluid a shock absorber looses the worse is it's capacity to dampen impulses. I cannot indicate by what amount of leaking fluid a shock absorber is considered to be exhausted. Since the shock absorber is a highly ...


3

A vehicle without shock absorbers will bounce many times after hitting a bump. The shocks basically dampen the bump force into the vehicle and they dampen (or slow) the rebound of the vehicle springs. This creates a smoother ride. Typically a BAD shock absorber is one that has lost it's oil and moves freely, so it can no longer dampen. The easiest way to ...


3

With the mileage on the car I'd definitely be looking at worn-out suspension components as the cause. The "Push" test outcome you describe could suggest that the struts/shocks are failing but another are to look at would be the suspension bushes at the front - as these age the rubber gets harder and this can result in the sort of rough ride you are ...


2

If properly installed, there's really nothing to be done. As mentioned above, you can clean them to prevent the seals from being damaged by grit. Most setups have covers over them anyways that keeps most of the dirt out. Those covers tend to fall apart after a few years though. Either way, I don't think I've ever seen a failure due to seal damage. Have ...


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