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6

Here is where I would start. First check the tension of the belt, just a quick push on the belt and you'll be able to tell, if its firm it's good, but if the belt has slack you'll need to tighten a tensioner pulley, or tighten down the pump or other pulley somewhere. Also while the car is running, go check the serpentine belt and watch it to make sure it isn'...


5

Try to get hold of a workshop manual; failing that, a Chiltons or Haynes manual for that car. I've just checked the Haynes, and it does show the Alternator replacement in some detail. A couple of major hints; firstly, you get much better access going in through the passenger wheel-well. Take the wheel off, and the plastic shield between the wheel-well and ...


4

Based off this diagram, the adjusting bolt is not present in the pictures you provided: It looks like your Sentra has air-conditioning, which means that your belt tensioning mechanism sits above the power steering pump (leftmost belt-driven component).


4

According to manufacturer Dayco (Why Belt Dressing Is Not a Solution To Quiet a Noisy Belt), it should not be used. In the past, simply covering a noisy serpentine belt in belt dressing would quiet that pesky belt. That’s when belts were made of neoprene. Today, you should never put belt dressing on an EPDM-made serpentine belt. Belt dressing, and ...


3

Anyways, there is no tensioner between the alternator and the motor, it's just one belt that connects the two with nothing in between - at seemingly a static distance. It's installed by removing the bolts on the alternator so it can be moved into and out of place. The alternator actually pivots around the lower bolt, so you can remove the belt. The ...


3

More than likely, the tensioner pulley spring is weak. If, when you are running the truck, you see the tensioner flex a lot during operation (belt easily tries to straighten out), then the spring may be weak. Also, a lot of GM vehicles have a gauge. Look at where the pivot is for the tensioner pulley. Between the arm and the body, there will be an arrow on ...


3

As a fix for a squealing belt... no, I don't like it. Find the root cause and fix it. As a tool for increasing belt longevity... they last a long time on their own, I don't think I'd extend the normal maintenance interval on belts because I sprayed that stuff on them. So, it seems like a waste.


3

The culprit in this specific case was the steering pump pulley - it developed a slight play along the axis and the auxiliary belt started rubbing the sides of the pulley ridges. Since no one has a more comprehensive answer for similar issues I can try answering it myself now that I am more knowledgeable in this area. Causes of the noise The auxiliary belt ...


2

It sounds from the comments that you have eliminated belt slip as the culprit due to the sound of the squeak (and lack of squeal). If you can pinpoint the squeaking to one specific pulley, it is likely the bearings for that pulley are on their last legs. Bearings perform better under heavier loads, which could explain why the squeak goes away at higher ...


2

Different year same engine. Your image Loosen the idler pulley nut. And per the posted image loosen the adjuster to remove the belt. You don't have to remove the AC compressor to R&R the alternator on the 1.8. You can remove the fan shroud to access the lower bolt on the alternator and pull the alternator through the top.


2

When belts are installed, they need to be adjusted (depending on the vehicle) or they can slip causing a squealing sound. In some cases, the new belt is not stretched like the old one. This puts added pressure on the idler pulley. That can create a lot of noise if the pulley is going bad. They should have checked it. From what you describe, it sounds like ...


2

Assuming there is good belt tension, there may be an issue with your alternator's voltage regulator, which is built into the alternator in most modern vehicles. While your alternator tested good, the voltage regulator may have an intermittent issue which could explain the erratic performance you are experiencing. I recommend either replacing the alternator,...


2

Most likely alternator voltage drop could have cut the engine. None of your equipment should be damaged with a loss of an accessory serpentine belt. The odd noise could be a bad pulley or tensioner if it wasn't replaced with the belt. That can add odd noises before/after engine load.


1

It looks like you have a long-term oil leak, perhaps from the timing cover or crankshaft seal. This probably got on to the serpentine belt in sufficient quantities to cause slipping, overheating, and eventual failure. If a serpentine belt fails due to wear or a bound tensioner, you will end up with dry black strands, powder, and chunks everywhere. However,...


1

Obviously the parts are related, seeing as how the serpentine drive belt is associated with both the idler pulley and the alternator, but realistically the idler is just worn out and one has nothing to do with the other. The idler is a stationary pulley. It's only lot in life is to provide a pivot point and change the direction of the belt as it travels its ...


1

The AC Idler Pulley bearing was defective. I identified the defective pulley by removing it from the car and inspecting it. The bearing was almost seized. I replaced with a new part and this noise is completely gone.


1

Do the following: Go down to your local parts store and purchase a new serpentine belt and a can of carb cleaner (or brake clean). Take the old belt off and throw it in the garbage. It's useless now that it has a lubricant sprayed on it. Take the carb cleaner and some paper towels and thoroughly clean all of the pulleys where the belt made contact. Install ...


1

Replacing the tensioner assembly would be a good idea as it usually has a bearing in it, given the age and probable mileage... I don't see any need to replace any of the other pulleys unless they have been damaged.


1

Yes you can, and this is definitely possible on some models of car (I know for sure that that can be done on my car and it is a belt from a Renault - can't remember which model). You need to find the length of belt necessary, so take a piece of string and wrap it around all the pulleys, make sure the adjuster or tensioner pulley is in the compressed ...


1

Another possibility is the wrong length belt was installed when it was replaced. Go to a parts store and get the part number, which is usually the belt width and length. If you want to make sure ask them to pull the belt and look at the number printed on it. Look on your invoice from when the belt was replaced, or on the belt to see if the number is there, ...


1

The soap on the belt will cause the belt to "slip quietly" – rather than stopping the slipping. Belt slippage is almost always due to either a damaged belt or low belt tension. With a newish serpentine belt this means that the problem is almost certainly the belt tensioner as there isn't another adjustment.


1

As you wait for an exact answer, you can use a string to measure the length. Set it to full loose and full tight, measure both, and pick something near the full loose side of it. Parts stores sell belts by rib count/width and length.


1

I should have watched this video more closely. It does have a separate power steering belt located behind and below the drive belt.


1

So we visited A LOT of services and no one knew what was wrong. But every mechanic told that it should not be caused by serpentine belt. In one special service which specialization was just transmissions - two guys took a look at it and said that it's not transmission related and sent us to other service where the guy checked it and said that it could be ...


1

Sounds like the clutch may be going bad in the A/C compressor. If it was slipping when engaged, you'd be hearing a terrible noise when the compressor is turned on, then water on it would definitely cause it to change in pitch. I don't know how you could test it, but I'm pretty sure if you remove the belt and then engaged the clutch, you could probably tell ...


1

Don't think you can move the pump in/out but the pully can be moved using a special tool to remove and a not so special tool to install( bolt and nut and washers) to press pully in


1

Did you check all the pulleys before installing the new belt, to check that one of them isn't close to seizing? (water pump, especially). If everything turns freely, I'd suspect that the belt wasn't tensioned correctly; you don't want it too tight or too loose.


1

You could start by changing the serpentine belt. Your Windstar has a self adjusting tensioner, so it could be this also, but there's no way to adjust it independently of changing it. You can check to see if it's doing it's job by running the engine and seeing if the belt has a lot of flop (not sure how to describe this) when you rev then quickly release the ...


1

Usually a belt squeaking is due to one of two things: worn out serpentine belt; tensioner has lost spring tension. Of the two, I'd suggest the belt is probably at fault as the tensioner should last much longer than a little over two years. You can put belt dressing on the belt, but your better bet is to just replace it. The belt should be okay for a little ...


1

To answer your question directly: To my knowledge there is no way a slipping serpentine belt would cause a single cylinder misfire, let alone all of them to show a misfire. The serpentine belt and ignition systems are two completely different systems. The only commonality between the two is the charging system (alternator), but even so, as @vini_i stated, ...


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