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6

You could speak to a bodyshop, get the price for a repair and attempt to haggle that off the price. However, you could approach it a different way. If the damage has been done to the vehicle, it says something about the previous owner. If the repair has been poorly executed it says something else about the previous owner. My angle would be "Look, I have ...


3

Kelley Blue Book typically has four categories that a car can fall into: Fair, Good, Very Good, and Excellent in increasing order of car condition. The Very Good rating details these points as the major characteristics of a car that is in Very Good condition: •Has had minor paint touch-up and/or bodywork •Requires minimal reconditioning •The engine ...


3

To a large extent, it depends what the car is worth to you. For myself, a little scratch in the side of the car doesn't bother me at all. Sure, it will be a problem for rust later (maybe). But at that point I'll probably have other scratches in other places, so a rust job will be in normal order. However, judging from your post, I'm guessing that you are ...


3

Usually the book value is actually a range of values, and your car will fall somewhere within that range depending on it's condition, mileage and extras. If it's only a single value, then I'd expect that to be a mid-range value, so a car in average condition with average mileage and the expected wear and tear for it's age. A lot of it depends on the laws ...


3

Honestly, don't do it. The ROI on doing maintenance before a trade in is negligible. Most dealers don't car about the tires on the car as long as there are tires on the car and they are not dangerously bald. Things like making the car look nice might add some additional value, but again the ROI would be low. If you really wanted to see if you can negotiate ...


2

Any inspection gives prominence to the vehicle and confidence to the seller provided it's done by somewhere seen as reputable, which does obviously include the dealership network. Check your local automobile club, by which I mean the types of organisation that provide breakdown cover and recovery services such as the RAC, AAA, etc... These typically have ...


2

There's a lot of things going on in your question. 1. To fix or not to fix: nevermind the Kelly BlueBook value. That's only useful in determining a proper resale value. Are you driving a resale value or are you driving a motorvehicle? More to the point, are you repairing the resale value or are you repairing the motorvehicle? Look at that car: do you want ...


2

Around here we have Kelly Blue Book. It will list values in perfect, good, fair, or poor condition. perfect - low mileage, minimal wear and tear. good - this is the category most well cared for vehicles will fall into fair - runs and drives, has some cosmetic of mechanical issues poor - unreliable, major issues When selling, you don't need to point out ...


2

The only time it's worth putting money into a car to trade it is if the money you get is more than the money your spend. If you have a car that's not running then getting it running makes the trade in value much higher, so can be worth it depending on how much it costs. Other than that, cleaning a car so it's not filthy makes sense but not paying for it to ...


1

You should fill out both top and bottom with the same information and both buyer and seller should sign twice. Then cut and save the BOTTOM for your records. That's it...


1

So far as the UK is concerned, I would say you definitely need to declare anything which makes the car illegal - but most sensible buyers who want a car to use (rather than one to break up for spare parts) would not consider buying an old used car without a recent MOT (safety) test certificate in any case. In the UK, the MOT certificate may list items that "...


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