13

Installing an aftermarket security system (possibly even two-way or with cellular communications and a GPS-tracker) would be your best bet if you are concerned about car being stolen. Locks are often model-specific and I don't believe it would be an easy task to retrofit a newer lock into an older car. Generally, any car lock, new or old, can be opened very ...


10

@Enot has an excellent answer but I still want to contribute a little as well. Specific to your questions, Auto locks made in the 90's I would argue are BETTER in many cases than their newer after market counterparts these days. Many older locks used side bar designs (like the GM door locks, Ford ignitions, Chrysler locks) where the newer replacements are ...


5

OK, so this turned in an unexpected direction - when I loosened the bolts of the starter some water started running out I when I completely removed it I found this: Somehow water got into the starter area and the pinion rusted in the extended position. That of course explains why I couldn't hear or feel the solenoid engaging. I took it in to bench test it ...


4

Those are captive nuts, if they are not rusted then the shroud stops them turning. If they are rusted or seized then the nuts can rotate in the shroud and you will need to hold them with pliers or mole-grips. Just undo the bolts ftom the other side.


4

With older cars, the value of the securing the vehicle is not in preventing it from being stolen, but rather preventing the contents of the vehicle from being stolen. Other than joyriding, most cars from the 1990s would have little value to a thief. There are almost no demands for parts for vehicles from that era, unless someone just happens to have a ...


2

It makes no sense to change the locks in your car, because it isn't locks that prevent a car from being stolen. Door locks can be bypassed with a slim-jim, or a good old-fashioned brick will smash a window. If you want to prevent your car from being broken into don't have anything valuable within sight, if you want to make your car hard to steal then invest ...


2

It just happened with our company-owned 2011 Prius. We had two drivers (one a trainee) in the vehicle, when a long-distance job came in. The second driver got dropped off at the office, while the first driver did the delivery, except that the key fob was in the second driver's coat pocket. There was no problem until the 1st driver, now 40 miles away tried ...


2

Having to open the bonnet or hood to remove / refit said fuse or relay is so* obvious and time consuming same as grovelling under the dash for a fuse or relay there. May just as well remove a coil lead or the dizzy rotor arm which was done on older cars by some. I put a kill switch on a Volvo 240 in the row of standard switches, in fact it was also a spare ...


1

To your second question, Generally, caged nuts would be used during assembly when the location of the Nut is difficult to work with, and especially if the 2 parts prefer to not stay together, which would lead to nuts being dropped. By attaching these first 2 in cages attached to the part, working the Bolt from the other would be much easier until some ...


1

If you have a metal door lever to open the door while inside, do this. Hold onto the lever as you slide out and exit the car. Let go only after you are standing on the ground. If there is no metal to hang onto, then you need to add a piece of metal plumbers strapping that is screwed to the metal of the car door. This way you keep yourself grounded while you ...


1

The missing security light means the ecu you have installed is not good, not compatible or just has the wrong calibrations installed on it. There are two ways to do this. The right way with GM tools or J2534 or the backyard mechanic way. The right way: I usually use tech2 or a cardaq with GM SPS from ACDELCOTDS Your goal is to Replace+Program the PCM so that ...


1

if you just want something quick and simple, removing the starter relay or engine computer's fuse/relay is generally enough. Just make sure to remove the ignition side fuse for pcm and not the keep alive memory fuse. Cant imagine you would cause any damage other then maybe widening the terminals in the fuse box more then normal


1

Ironically for the OP's question, the 90s is where cars started to be harder to steal because of the widespread addition of immobilisers. These were required by law in Europe from 1998, but most cars had them before that. I know my 1993 Peugeot 309 had one. As other answers have said, with the addition of immobilisers, theft of cars became relatively rare. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible