Hot answers tagged

16

I think we have enough to call this an answer now. Here's how to do this: If you can't use an existing hole, insure that there is clearance on both sides of the firewall before drilling. You can use whatever bit that fits. Although if you have limited space and can't use a prick punch make a dimple so the bit doesn't wander, a step drill might be more ...


13

tl dr - Have no fear of Vaseline and o-rings O-rings are made out of many different materials. I would suggest that those o-rings which are made to work in the automotive realm are made to be resistant to things such as oil, gasoline, and other petroleum products. This would include Vaseline. While Vaseline and other petroleum products may degrade real ...


9

No. As far as I can tell, there is no reason that Vaseline might gradually degrade the rubber O-ring on which it has been applied. O-rings that are manufactured for automotive purposes do tend to be made in a rather durable fashion so as to be able to withstand whatever sort of fluids that might accidentally get spilt during car maintenance. If you are ...


7

I see two possibilities: He just putted some leak-stop additive in the engine oil. That is some additive that is intended to stop an seal leak by miraculously thickening the oil around the seal area and not in the oil channels (where it needs to flow unobstructed). Needless to say that this additives most of the time do an awful job. The crankshaft seal got ...


6

My options would be to replace the shaft were it sits now. No fun as a "flat back" job but it is not very hard. Or tow it to a repair site. It does not look like it should be driven. A driveshaft that gets loose can cause lots of damage. Removing the shaft and driving without one in place is not an option as this would likely damage the dual pump drive ...


6

I don't think it's safe/wise to drive 80 miles on that. It needs to be put on a trailer and dragged home at son's expense (some insurances cover towing also, but 80 miles is a bit far. If you have a truck, maybe rent a trailer for the day)


6

Your final thought is correct. Only 1 calliper was faulty. You said it that the pads on the faulty calliper had even wear, which indicates that the slider mechanism was not seized. The piston on the faulty calliper was clearly seizing out and not freeing the pads when the brake was released. If this had been on the front wheels you would likely have felt ...


5

I agree with the accepted answer by @HandyHowie, but here is a heads-up: watch that new caliper, and check its temperature against the others in a few days and again in a few weeks. Here's why: sometimes a caliper just seems to be defective when the real culprit is the brake hose serving that caliper. The internal lining of the brake hose can collapse and ...


4

Yes it might, if it's made from Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) like what is used on some MAF sensors. It might make your o- ring swell larger so it won't fit correctly anymore.


4

Without replacing it, there are few options. You would need heat to smooth the material back down. Using a heat gun sparingly & carefully may work, but doing so improperly would likely make the situation worse. The other option is to trim the parts sticking up with a very sharp razor blade. Careful not to cut deep into the material, only along the ...


4

1. The screw. Drill cautiously two small holes (opposite to each other) into the seal, then drive two drywall screws into then. Use the screws to pull out the seal. Make the holes exactly in the middle of the seal band. Use a drill bit for metal, just large enough for the inner screw diameter. Do not drive the screws too far inside, just enough that they ...


4

tl dr: Replace the old o-rings I would suggest you don't have to replace them, but I would replace them anyway. If they are the original ones, they are probably around 9 years old. At this point, the rubber is probably very hard. Secondly, you've probably already nicked a couple of them, which means they'll leak unmetered air into the intake system. This ...


3

The easiest way to quickly identify which type you have is to measure the t-top glass length where the glass fits under the center t-bar: Factory Installed T-Tops (Fisher) = 30 1/4" & Aftermarket Installed T-Tops (Cars & Concepts) = 28" Both C&C and Fisher T-tops are installed in the same place relative to the rear of the roof. Due to the ...


3

Run your fingernail across the surface of the dampener where the seal usually rides (you can usually see a ring around the snout of it). If your fingernail does not detect any kind of ridges (well, valley, actually), it's fine. You'll probably see the ring where the seal rides, but if you cannot feel it with your fingernail, it's fine. If there is a slight ...


2

One way you can find out if it's a leaking door seal is to apply glycerine to the door seals and then drive around to see if the noise changes or disappears. If there's no change at all, the sound is probably not coming from the seal. If it is quieter, or changes tone or pitch, then there's probably a gap somewhere. By applying the glycerine to only part of ...


2

Post repair answers to On my SOHC model, there is a left-side timing belt cover that can be removed without taking any other components out, so you can easily take a look at the camshaft sprocket and with a flashlight you can see back to the seal. The sprocket is definitely in the way (and definitely cannot be removed at this point), but you can see ...


2

Because it's hard to get in there and see the camshaft seal, I'm skeptical that it can be diagnosed properly without taking the car apart. Could an apparent oil leak (there's some drippage on a hose underneath the left head) be caused by anything else? How should I go about independently diagnosing this leak? Should I bring this somewhere else for another ...


2

Not all oils rot rubber, for example transmission oil or brake fluid does not rot rubber. However engine oil will. That's why if one uses engine oil for brake fluid or in their power steering pump, it won't be too long before you will need a new steering pump or an entire brake system overhaul. Engine oil will cause the rubber to swell up and fall apart. P....


2

Take a second opinion, as always. To see if it needs replacement; reverse the car 20ft. If there is a pool of oil where the car has been sitting, you should find out where it is coming from and fix it. If not, don't worry. The rear main seal does give way occasionally, but as you say - it's an expensive job if that's the only thing you're doing. $12 for ...


2

I found it, its called seam sealer


2

I've removed the seals from bearings to lube a bearing instead of replacing it on multiple occasions, but generally out of the vehicle. For that, I'd probably go out and buy a new bearing and take a good seal out of it, replacing the damaged one in the installed bearing (hoping it's a perfect fit). To remove the seals, I will start with very thin edge to ...


2

I'm not familiar with that exact vehicle, but doors do, generally, have drains. Lay on the ground under the open door and look for small holes. Poke up through the holes with a toothpick or something similar to see if anything comes out. The drains are generally closer to the exterior side of the door. Water enters doors around the window and any other ...


2

Is it possible that a single rear brake has been doing the lion's share of slowing the vehicle down for 11 months? Front brakes do much more of the work than rear brakes. This is why front brakes must be cooled better than rear brakes, why front brakes have bigger rotors, thicker pads, etc. It sounds like you had a lightly sticking rear caliper which ...


1

That used to be a very common problem. The drains ( a rubber stopper) were usually hidden by the rubber weather stripping on the bottom of the door. When I found them I cut away the rubber as a tiny air leak is much less problem than a door full of water. I had 2004 Titan , no water problems in 140,000 miles and it was parked outside under pines, oaks and ...


1

I would measure the diameter of where the seal locates, the depth available for the seal and the diameter of the shaft. Any good seal selling place can match a seal with that along with the speed of the shaft and its duty ie hot liquid, grease etc Those measurements need to be accurate, at least 1 decimal place.


1

Epoxy is a good choice for plastic, but it won't keep the crack from expanding without some help. I find that epoxying a piece of fiberglass mesh tape across material works well in a lot of cases, if I were looking to seal a battery I'd first fill the gap with epoxy, then bridge the crack with a small piece of fiberglass mesh tape. However, you have to be ...


1

@neuromancer, in that case i would call a glass company and ask if the can or refer you to who can do the repair. If you take it to a dealer they will most likely sub the work out to anothercompany anyways.


1

I fitted this type of seal to v8s that I built - the seal works on compression and the material mix is designed not to degrade with heat / time. If you replace it with something else - you suggest rubber - then you will need to consider if the rubber will degrade or soften over time - with the consequent downtime and costs of, maybe, removing the engine. You ...


1

The teflon seal has to be stretched to fit. You have to heat them in hot water and stretch them out some. I took a dowel and bevelled the end of it. Put the teflon seal on the end of it, then dunk it in hot water while working it up the bevel to get an even stretch. It takes a bit of work, but isn't that hard to make it happen.


1

For tail lights, usually the seal is part of the assembly. Your best bet is to apply some sealant. Car parts stores will have some, they sell it in tubes.


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