35

The 1000 mile oil change is a holdover from days of yore. It falls into the "my grandfather /father (add appropriate generation) said you should always"... Add what ever urban myth was part of the lesson. Part of the reasoning was due to the Moly-Lube that was part of the engine assembly process. The theory was that the assembly lube was thick enough to clog ...


30

The logic behind replacing the coolant, rather than just topping it off, is to remove impurities. If the reason you have to add to it is that there is a slow leak somewhere, you may get by with just adding some now and then. But if the nature of the problem is that that coolant itself is being depleted, without removing any impurities, then yes, it has to ...


23

You shouldn't be constantly replenishing the coolant - if you are, there's probably something wrong with your car! Modern car cooling systems are designed to be almost maintenance free, so you should only need to drain and replace it after a long interval (e.g. the 11 years you quote), rather than every two years with older systems - obviously you should ...


18

Do what it says in the owner's manual. FWIW the manual said the first oil change from new on my current car was at 18,000 miles, not 1,000. I queried that with the dealer and the reply was "yes, that's correct." Nothing bad has happened after 100,000 miles (and it still only burns half a liter of oil in the 18,000 miles between changes, just like it did ...


14

Here's a "tip to make sure I got everything right" for the future. One that I use myself, and taught my Auto Tech students as well: The very first thing is to take off the oil cap, and place it over the latch area for the hood, such that you can't close the hood unless you move the cap. This prevents the worst possible thing: finishing the job but ...


12

There are two main things about tranny fluid: Transmission fluid is checked when it's hot (up to running temperature). As the fluid gets up to temperature it expands. If the fluid is cold, it won't give the proper level reading, thus overfilling will ensue. One of the main fluid compartments of the transmission is the torque converter. When full, the fluid ...


11

NOTE: I have anecdotal vs. empirical data on this, so please understand that caveat. I believe the problem which is actually being discussed is doing a transmission flush when it has never been done before (or with long periods without). The theory is, over time, buildup occurs within the transmission when flushes do not occur at regular maintenance ...


10

I believe you just dripped some oil on your exhaust when drained it, don't worry, and your "paranoid" stuff is good - it means you care. Good job Snake! ;)


10

Old oil isn't poison to your engine or to the new motor oil you are putting in. When you are doing an oil change, whatever old oil is left behind (along with the particulates floating around) will get diluted into the new oil. The less old oil there is the better, of course. Most oil pans are designed to hold onto a little bit of old oil. If you look at ...


9

As Bob says, formal servicing should always follow the manufacturer's schedule - Make sure to take into account any variations suggested for your location/climate/usage pattern. This should include routine things like oil and filter changes, as well as more major, but less frequent things such as timing belts. In terms of more general checks and inspections,...


9

In general, at the very minimum, you will want to check air pressure in tires, and all fluid levels and ensure that they are at the proper levels. Also, checking the condition of the oil and possibly changing it if it is needed (on a trip that long, probably wouldn't hurt to go ahead and do that if it over halfway till the next one anyways). If staying ...


8

tl;dr: a broken timing belt always means some sort of damage. Like Brian says, interference engines are obviously at risk of the most straightforward damage: pistons hitting valves with great energy, causing ma$$ive destruction. Here is a cautionary video illustrating some of the parts that can be immediately broken, causing a appalling domino effect of ...


8

Check with the manufacturer to see if it's an interference engine or not. Even so, that's not an absolute guarantee. Occasionally someone with an interference engine will get lucky and not have the valves and pistons attempt to occupy the same space at the same time. I've also heard anecdotal reports of non-interference engines suffering damage when ...


8

On non-interference motors there is no compelling reason to change out the belt on a schedule other than to ensure your vehicle does not leave you stranded at the most inopportune time. It will not damage anything if it does let go, but assume it will always leave you stranded. Something to think about here is to ensure you know exactly which type of motor ...


7

Open up the hood and look at the emissions control system label. That will indicate whether it meets California emissions standards or not. Also, at least for California (Not sure about other California-standards states), you can register a 49-state vehicle in California after you move there if you previously registered it in your previous home state.


7

Use a dry erase board (whiteboard) I use a whiteboard in the garage. Low tech, but very effective. I track not only necessary service date/mileage, but also when they're due for government inspection and also any other minor items I notice but don't want to fix right then. So for me, it looks something like this: vehicle next svc date/mi ...


7

To answer the question about what changed with vehicles requiring longer oil change intervals, the answer is that there are a number of factors. Internal tolerances have improved, oil quality standards have improved, and friction-reducing techniques have been developed making the 3,000 mile oil change rule of thumb an anachronism. Even in the most stressful ...


6

Obviously the timing belt needs to be replaced. Then they could change any followers or guides which mechanically get worn out. I would always recommend getting the water pump changed if it is driven off of the belt, or located in the same vicinity as the belt. The reason for this is, if you have to remove everything to replace the pump (ie: timing cover, ...


6

Go to the local parts store. They have small plastic stickers which remind you when to change the oil; in the USA, they're usually free, as long as you don't take hundreds. Get one for each vehicle, and put it on the windscreen - 'next service at 315,000 or August 2017' (OK, you can see how old my cars are!). To remember, just drive the vehicle and look up. ...


6

According to this 2016 Honda Pilot Manual (pages 28, & 146-148), the information display is informing you that your oil has 30% of its life left. After the oil change has been completed, the oil life monitor is reset. In other words, it is letting you know you will have to change the oil soon. This is a common feature on a lot of new cars. It is ...


5

Finally found out how to reset the service reminder manually. It was easier than expected. Here it comes in steps: Put in key Turn key to position 2 (this might be tricky, there are 3 positions, but its actually just before the engine starts, all electronics are on, lights flashing on "dashboard") Use buttons on steering wheel to navigate to "Service ...


5

If you've never done your own work, I wouldn't recommend the first two as your first venture. You should make your own call, of course. The third sounds fishy and I wouldn't address it at all without a clearer understanding of what they're trying to sell you. Just from looking these items over, they look like scheduled maintenance. Those types of tasks ...


5

The short answer is that you should always be guided by the maintenance schedule by the calendar set forth in your owner's manual. It will have a detailed calendar based on your usage profile and setting forth major items based on miles or dates, depending on what's most appropriate. Using my car as an example, there's a moderately major service required ...


5

There is a lot of debate about late ATF changes killing transmissions. To find the real answer you would need a statistically significant number of vehicles for each transmission, and a same-sized control group, driven identically for hundreds of thousands of miles... then one group serviced, the other not, then all driven identically for another hundred ...


5

You need to reset it. There should be a button. I found these instructions on a forum: Turn the ignition to RUN with the engine OFF. Press and release the reset button in the driver information center (DIC) until the OIL LIFE message is displayed. Once the alternating OIL LIFE and RESET messages appear on the DIC display, press and hold the reset stem ...


5

I don't know which specific fluid VW uses for power-steering, but many manufacturers use automatic transmission fluid, or something closely related to it. Unlike the engine and transmission, the power steering pump will not heat up it's fluid to extremes, the only significant heat the fluid will received is from being in the engine bay. Therefore, power-...


4

The other answer failed to mention how long the battery typically lasts, mentioning only the warranty of the battery. Furthermore, the other answer failed to mention that there are actually two batteries in Prius, the LV battery and the HV battery. The 12V LV battery is a lead-acid battery and has the same replacement interval than conventional car ...


4

A quick assessment of your normal consumables is worthwhile - do any bulbs need replacing, check your wiper blades, are there any visible leaks? Check your oil, depending on your relationship with your MOT garage, is it worth replacing your oil yourself, or can they do it cheaply if necessary? The only other thing I would do to make life easy for the ...


4

There is some sort of a lock-tight compound inside that thread. I have already removed that screw in my V6 Accord twice. (Practically the same engine) The first time was a pain. I have good socket spanners so instead of braking a socket I broke a, 1/2" in diameter, extension shaft. I used 5 feet long extension bars on both sides of a wrench - delivered ...


4

Yes you can apply all SI prefixes to meters. So a megameter would be one million meters or 1000 kilometers. Gigameter is 1000 megameters. Terameter is 1000 gigameters. Petameter is 1000 terameters etc. Gigameter and higher are usually only used in the context of space and astronomy because in normal contexts it is impossible to visualize or relate those ...


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