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10

Usually the puffs of blue smoke on startup are actually caused due to leaking valve seals. These can be changed without the need for an engine rebuild. Changing them out also can be done while the engine is in the vehicle. You could use this YouTube video as a source for directions for changing out the valve seals. The 305 will have the same valve train ...


7

Referring to this website: If all is well and there is no slack in the timing chain then you will see about three to five degrees of "reverse motion" before the distributor begins to turn. To measure this, do the following: Get a socket which fits the front balancer crank shaft bolt. Get a breaker bar which is long enough to turn the crank using it. ...


5

Take your car to a local parts store and have them check the battery. Old batteries lose cold cranking amps and it may just not be getting enough amperage to turn the engine and start the car. Often a battery on its last leg will work fine while its warm but not have what it takes in cold weather. In answer to the second part of your question, it sounds ...


5

The problem, in general, is that there is a leak between the lubrication system and the cooling system. There are only few obvious where this can happen: One is at the head gasket where oil can leak across the top of the head to the water passages (or into the cylinder or out the edge of the gasket) if the head isn't properly torqued of perhaps if there is ...


4

(EDIT NOTE: I made a bad assumption about the HEI distributor, so deleted all of that nonsense. Please do the following to see if it is an issue, though.) Please check the following: Take the distributor cap off so you can observe the rotor Put a socket on the crank shaft snout bolt (where the main crank pulley is at) Turn the crank clockwise until you see ...


3

You need to discover what your current rear differential is, then you can proceed forward with what you might be able to do for the Blazer. If I'm seeing things right, your rear end should be of the 10-bolt 7.5/7.625" variety (used in both the 4cyl/6cyl, 4x2/4x4 models). It can, however, utilize either the 26 or 28 spline axles. You should be able figure ...


3

More than likely, the tensioner pulley spring is weak. If, when you are running the truck, you see the tensioner flex a lot during operation (belt easily tries to straighten out), then the spring may be weak. Also, a lot of GM vehicles have a gauge. Look at where the pivot is for the tensioner pulley. Between the arm and the body, there will be an arrow on ...


3

Well, I got it running! Just want to post an answer for anybody else that runs across this issue. It ended up being the Fuel Pressure Regulator on the CPI Injector Spider. This is a small and cheap ($35.00) part that is mounted on the side injector. and was very straightforward to replace. I simply had to remove the upper intake manifold, and all the ...


3

You may want to jack it up and check the brakes and look to see if the fluid is coming from the brakes. It would be on the tire or the wheel on the inside. Look it over and try to pinpoint the origin of the fluid leak first. While it is up, check for any looseness by moving the tire left - right and up-down. You could have a bad caliper, bad wheel bearing ...


2

One possibility is an split hose causing an unmetered air leak. This is an cheap fix to look out for before spending money on expensive components. Check the crank case ventilation hoses and the main intake hoses.


2

At the HVAC Control Switch: full vacuum measured at source hose able to manually operate all three actuators using a vacuum pump hissing sound from a vacuum leak Using a stethoscope, I narrowed the leak down to inside the switch itself, which was only just changed a couple months ago. It's being replaced under warranty. EDIT: Changed the HVAC Control ...


2

Yes, you can remove it. Not knowing which engine you have in your vehicle, it's hard to tell you exactly what you'll need. Some engines, depending on the AC placement, will just require a shorter belt. Others will need a separate idler pulley which you put in place of the AC compressor. All it does it takes up the slack. Conversely, if you aren't too ...


2

You probably need to replace the head gaskets. The oil pump when functioning properly makes much more pressure than the coolant system. As a result, when the head gasket fails, oil can make its way into the coolant system. But not the other way around. The good news is since your oil is not contaminated with coolant, there should be no actual engine damage ...


2

Generally as you start tuning an engine for more power, you get into a cycle where one thing leads to another – for example, I put in bigger injectors, but I don't have enough air to burn the fuel, so I add a bigger turbo, but now there is more power than the clutch can really handle so I put in a new clutch – and around and around it goes. Kind of like If ...


2

This engine is a single in block cam engine so there should be no high pressure oil going to the heads across the head gasket. If the head gasket was blown you would get the classic water in oil and not oil in water. The radiator on these are a single unit containing the engine cooler and a transmission cooler, if you have an automatic transmission. Both ...


2

From what you have described, you are seeing (and hearing) the AC compressor turning on and off. This is normal on most vehicles when the heating selector is set to defrost the windshield. They designed it so the AC can assist in removing moisture from the air to help defrost more quickly. If this is happening all the time, no matter what the heat selector ...


2

Unfortunately I suspect the answer is both - from what you've described I think the alternator has been failing for a while, and the increased discharge from the battery has probably caused that to fail as well. It may be that the battery can be revived with a good, long, deep charge, but even if it can I suspect it's lifetime will be much shortened.


2

The battery isn't holding sufficient charge to power the vehicle's electrics. This could be due to: a failing alternator So something about the alternator or regulator is not allowing it to put out the requisite voltage and current. high voltage drop across the battery-charging circuit Here the alternator is actually doing its job, but things like ...


2

When it only works on high, this is a sure sign the blower resistor is blown. The resistor "does work" at the slower speeds by limiting the power which will flow through. It's direct power on high speed. When the resistors fail, no power at all goes through these. This is a very common problem on GM vehicles when they get a few years on them.


2

You don't find a torque spec because there isn't one. There's a process you must follow to adjust your rocker arms. Stock rocker arm nuts have an interference fit, which have a clamping force of their own on the rocker stud. They don't have a torque spec, because they don't need a torque spec. I have already written the exact procedure to adjust the rocker ...


1

A v8 once warm can easily idle comfortably around 600rpm (in good condition...), my 3.5litre v8 did that all the time once warm (but not fully up to temp...).


1

The problem was the U Joints. No other fixes were necessary to stop the noise or the vibration.


1

Basically it is up to the chip creators as to what exactly this means. To one tuner, Stage 1 could mean a 50hp boost, while to another it could mean a 35hp boost. There isn't going to be one set answer for any given chip. The only thing which will usually hold true is Stage 2 will give you a bigger boost than a Stage 1 will. A Stage 3 will give you more than ...


1

I would follow the path from the tank to the intake, just like for an electrical problem I'd start at the battery and work out. Might try working in reverse if that's easier, since the fuel path is a bit more straightforward and the engine side might be more accessible than the tank side. It could be anywhere there isn't a good seal. Hard to say more than ...


1

I will need more info but here is what I can say. for the heater you will need to check to see if the heater core was hooked back up plugged or bypassed. I am assuming you let the engine warm up while testing the heater. It is less likely that they unhooked the push pull cable to the heater cores valve. it may be a coincidence but this could have also ...


1

Another possibility is the wrong length belt was installed when it was replaced. Go to a parts store and get the part number, which is usually the belt width and length. If you want to make sure ask them to pull the belt and look at the number printed on it. Look on your invoice from when the belt was replaced, or on the belt to see if the number is there, ...


1

The soap on the belt will cause the belt to "slip quietly" – rather than stopping the slipping. Belt slippage is almost always due to either a damaged belt or low belt tension. With a newish serpentine belt this means that the problem is almost certainly the belt tensioner as there isn't another adjustment.


1

Since you replaced the O2 sensor and exhaust manifold, your truck may need to relearn its fuel trims. Try resetting the computer by pulling the battery negative post terminal for about 1/2 hour. This will force the computer back to factor fuel trims and give it a chance to relearn what's going on now that it's not receiving bad information about the quality ...


1

(I have used this answer on several questions for chevy truck brake issues) I have a 97 suburban, so I believe things are similar, but I have rear drums. I too have replaced lines on this truck and spent hours of time and over a gallon of fluid trying to get it bled correctly. A couple things that I've learned and have helped. Bench bleed the master. ...


1

You've got air in your lines, I am sure on that. Even if your question leaves me wondering in some places what you mean exactly. Once I have had similar issues where I replaced brake components, but couldn't bleed by pumping the brakes. I believe the reason you and I had in that case is when there is "so much" air in all of the lines, even pumping the ...


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