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47

I wouldn't touch the odometer. The rule I always subscribe to is that the odometer measures how far the chassis has rolled. Otherwise a person could go mad trying to figure out which repairs/replacements should reset the clock. (Obviously not tires or wheels, but wheel bearings? Axles/driveshaft? Transmission/differential? etc...) It also makes sense when ...


25

I've never replaced an odometer when replacing an engine. What I will do, however, is make a note in the cars documentation that the engine was replaced at xxx,000 miles with a new/refurbished engine with xx,000 miles. I also keep all the receipts of any ancillary parts replaced at the same time (tensioners, water pumps, etc), so that a new buyer can see ...


14

You're probably better off not replacing the odometer. You will need to keep accurate track of how far the car has been driven in total, so if you were to later sell your car without disclosing that the actual mileage is the new odometer reading + 220k miles, you could be found guilty of fraud. You certainly don't have to replace the odometer, and it will ...


6

A tire is not necessarily damaged by sitting still for a short period of time like 4 hours. Have the shop inspect it and see if they recommend it being repaired, since I assume there is a good reason why it's flat. If it's a simple puncture and it can be patched and there is no evidence of sidewall damage, I'd keep it if it were mine. UPDATED: Now that ...


1

I believe you can just change the switch. In what I've found, it's called Outside Door Handle Passive Entry Switch. The outside door handles either have the hole or not, but don't come with the switch. There are two parts to the door handle, so it would have to come off, then the door handle separated to get at the switch. Here's what the parts look like ...


1

It's possible for the rings to wear and loose tension, with the piston and bore showing little sign of wear.In that case putting in new rings will probably revitalise the engine.Symptoms of that would be low compression,lack of power,but the saw still running and the piston / bore being on good condition. But more common,or at least total failures,usually ...


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