7

The short answer is: no - not without the manufacturer's diagnostic tools. The long answer is: maybe. Modern cars have most (if not all) exterior and interior lights controlled by the body control module (BCM). Most (if not all) switches are connected to the BCM as well. This provides a lot of flexibility. A prime example is if you leave your headlights ...


6

One obvious example would be if the bonnet (hood) is open and someone could be harmed by contact with fans, belts etc. I would guess that there is an interlock to prevent this happening accidentally but even so it is something you should consider. There may also be cases where is it illegal to leave the engine running while a vehicle is parked for ...


5

Remote start is, in my opinion, never safe, and an ill-advised feature (but your opinion may differ, there is obviously a market for such a feature or GM wouldn't build it in). I would personally have the manufacturer disable it, and have them confirm in writing that it is disabled, just to be on the safe side liability-wise myself. There is not much to ...


4

Modern cars turn off all electronics when starting the engine. Ever notice how your radio cuts out when you start your car? Turning a car on and off isn't a big deal. UPS does this at every single stop to save fuel. The fuel cost savings beats any increased cost for maintenance. Change your oil regularly, follow your maintenance schedule. Starting your car ...


4

If the vehicle has power door locks it's not a big deal. You can use a system like the one below. It's currently $35 from JC Whitney If you don't have factory power locks it gets more complicated. You will need to install door lock actuators, either aftermarket or factory. You could get the actuators, linkages and such from a junk yard, sometimes easier ...


4

In certain jurisdictions it is illegal to leave your engine running while unattended. This is true in some US states including Pennysylvania, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia, Colorado, Texas, Wisconsin, and South Carolina, and in the UK at least.


3

Leaves or litter could have accumulated under your car and be ignited by the hot exhaust pipe. Some critter could have taken shelter in the warm engine compartment. It might run off if you enter the car to start it, but would be surprised by a remote start. Aside from the danger to the critter, this could damage the car.


3

I wouldn't use remote start if there's unsupervised kids in the car. :)


3

Yes, you will see increased wear. Having the engine warm up by idling at no load is inefficient: because there's no load, the engine will produce little heat and take a long time to warm up. Engine wear is worse when the engine is cold. When you start the engine and drive off immediately, the load helps the engine warm up quicker. Leaving electric loads ...


3

I assume that at this point you've already figured it out, or gone another route. Buuut for anybody that's still interested, this will work as described in this photo from above: The negative outputs (blue and green) are simply connected to ground when the corresponding relay (unlock and lock) inside the remote start is activated. The unit labeled "...


3

I would not worry too much about whether you are going to run out of battery power, especially if you keep the remote-start at a .8 second crank time. You will not burn up enough battery juice to cause yourself any issues. Your battery has several identifiers associated with it. A common one is CCA or Cold Cranking Amps. This shows you what the power output ...


2

Just my thought, but I have a similar issue on my race car trailer, which has a huge inverter which runs lights, an air conditioner, a microwave, a refigerator (frozen burritos and healthy hydration liquids) and the DVD player. (These things are essential when racing a vintage car. Say nothing!) My actual point is, I have a bank of 3 deep-cycle batteries ...


2

I assume you're looking for something like this? The key to this is you're looking for a remote starter which happens to provide a low battery protection option. You must have remote start to do what you're asking, and honestly once that's addressed it really isn't a big stretch to add low-voltage protection.


2

I would say it is actually better for your engine as it is not under load while warming up. Accessories do not matter. Your car has several circuits - Always on (lights, locks), Accessory (HVAC, radio), Run (ECU), Start (starter). Accessories are not powered when the start circuit is active (unless some bad wiring was done). Even my 70 truck is wired ...


2

Here is the factory wiring diagram, so there are several possibilities why it will not start with the key. If it has an aftermarket remote start system this can make diagnosis more complicated depending on how it was integrated into the starting circuit.


2

Sounds like the ignition switch, but it could possibly be a fuse. A couple things to test. Check any fuses related to starting. I think I would start by removing the steering column cover so you can access the ignition switch and wiring. Get a test light or multimeter and verify you are getting power in. Turn the switch to various positions and verify ...


2

Remote start is not a separate starting system. It is an electronic control that triggers the existing system to start the engine. Since your car starts by key without issue, I suspect the problem you are having is not related to the car battery or starter itself. Likely what is happening is the battery in your remote is low or dead causing no signal. ...


2

A frayed wire could definitely be the cause. What is the, "wire to the remote starter" and what is it's function? Starting a car, remotely or otherwise, requires a large wire to provide power from the battery to the starter motor, usually through a relay. If you have a bad connection such as wire that's not large enough, wire that is damaged or frayed, or ...


2

If I remember correctly, the radio system in Jeeps are closely tied to the security system in the vehicle. It has something to do with the door chimes, air bags, and parts of the security (incl your remote start). When the thief removed your radio, they probably killed/disabled the remote start since the way that it's all connected requires your radio to be ...


1

A solid-state relay is an electronic switch, you'd need to find one designed to controlled by, nominally, 12 V DC and that would also switch DC loads. You'll need to know the current requirements of the load that you're switching to decide on the output capacity of the SSR that you need. It's also worth noting that solid-state switches impose a voltage drop ...


1

Unless you have a crappy starter or it was installed wrong, you can perform a secure takeover without turning the vehicle off even on Push to Start/keyless ignition vehicles. I install remote starters for a living. I've done a PTS where all you had to do was get in and press the start stop twice like normal (before pressing the brake) and as long as your ...


1

Was wondering if the neutral safety switch (auto) or clutch start switch (manual) is out (depending on your tranny). Your remote start would not be factory (didn't make them factory). It could be installed to bypass the neutral safety/clutch start, in fact if it is a manual car, it would be wired that way so you wouldn't have to have the clutch depressed to ...


1

Yes, but the amount of effort and money depends on if it has power door locks, and if it's a manual or automatic transmission.


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