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Summary The difference for passenger cars is pretty small, but it seems to be quite real. The less you maintain your tires the bigger the effect is. In large fleets of vehicles, the effect can be quite large. Get Nitrogen™ Further investigation of the site justinm410 linked to, getnitrogen.org, shows a number of studies that (assuming they're all legit) ...


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Nitrogen molecules are bigger than normal air - Air isn't a molecule, it's a compound consisting of 78% Nitrogen, 20% Oxygen, 2% other. So that's a ridiculous comparison. Less leakage - See above. Fuel effecient [sic] - Two tires at the same pressure, one with air and one with nitrogen, will have the same fuel efficiency. See above. Less irregular wear - ...


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Take the lead! Ride smart! Marketing blahblah [Nitrogen] for your SAFETY & ECONOMY I am under the impression that air-filled tires also maintain their pressure, so I do not see a remarkable benefit Nitrogen molecules are bigger than normal air No: The bond length of N2 is 109,8 pm. The bond length of O2 is 121 pm. So nitrogen has a higher ...


6

Yes and No, Vehicle manufacturers often change a lot of parameters of a vehicle when deploying them in different countries , the main reason for this is to make sure that the vehicle adapts to that particular market. The main things the manufacturers alter are: Engine : Manufacturers often change the engine to suit the market , for example, I live in India ...


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There are some real benefits regarding using Nitrogen in your tires The poster stated Take the lead, ride smart I don't know if it's smarter to use nitrogen [Nitrogen] for your SAFETY & ECONOMY Nitrogen molecules are larger than oxygen or hydrogen. As a result nitrogen filled tires tend to maintain their pressure for longer periods of time. It'...


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There are a large number of factors that contribute to fuel economy. As others have mentioned, driver style, driving condition (hwy/city), and vehicle condition/weight (roof rack, towing, loaded full of kids/gear) will all have an effect on fuel economy. However, to answer your question, we will assume an unloaded car with a mixed duty cycle and a ...


4

Axleaddict.com shares 5 tips on how to extend turbo life. Here they are: Regularly Scheduled, Synthetic Oil Changes On turbos, it is recommended to change the oil every 8,000 km (5,000 miles) to preserve the system. Fully synthetic oils are also the best, because they protect better at high temps. Warm It Up It's great to have the right ...


3

I would say a Turbo is no more likely to fail than other components on your car such as engine or gearbox. A Turbo on a diesel engine is likely to last even longer than on a petrol engine due to lower temps, rpm and loads. Turbo design and engineering has come a long way since the 1980's. Assuming it's not a modified or a competition car, the Turbo on any ...


3

You've asked a general question that has a few too many variables to answer concretely (e.g., type of turbo, application, environment, maintenance schedules, etc.) I'm going to propose a variant of your original question and answer that: Is it possible for an original equipment turbo to live as long as the rest of the car? The answer to that question is: ...


3

i think it is a mix of better information, more planning, better maintenance and misinformation The professional buyer, in contrast to the consumer, is not driven by emotions. So he can focus on the technical properties of the model. Certain fleet vehicles like ambulances or police cruisers get converted from ordinary vehicles by a specialized company. ...


3

Consumer Reports collects and publishes survey data on reliability and/or repair frequency. As far as I know, the data is specific to the US, and I think it covers vehicles for which they get statistically significant responses. Both domestic and imported vehicles are include. They also do long term studies and "niche" reports, for example they currently (...


2

Technically, yes. As engines get older, they do get less good fuel economy, and when they are totally made over, their fuel economy improves. However, generally the time you're trying to determine the condition of an engine in a general way is when you're buying. And when you're buying, you can't necessarily get an accurate fuel economy rating from the ...


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In reality, for modern cars, there won't be a lot to choose between similar models in terms of whole life reliability. Rust used to be the big thing which limited the life of cars but modern corrosion protection generally has this well under control, unless a vehicle has had accident damage badly repaired at some point. Similarly modern design and ...


2

Yeah, hedging bets is what even the manufacturer must do. I suppose that past reports are the best indication... combined with knowing what changes were made in the new car (that's what to watch out for). Any significantly different parts from previous models (where the part(s) worked perfectly fine) would be suspect. I like to check carcomplaints.com, ...


2

This is a fearsomely broad question and probably not really in keeping with the spirit of this group in that it doesn't ask for details for a specific mechanical issue but I will attempt to answer. The "cause of death" or reason that a car may be scrapped in the UK at least falls into a number of groups; Damaged due to accident, fire or flooding. ...


1

There are statistics on mandatory inspection failures. I think rust may be the deciding factor when it's considered whether to repair or replace, but as the cause of mandatory inspection failure, it's actually not on the top of the list. Suspension and braking faults are one of the most common cases of mandatory inspection failures. They, unlike rust, can ...


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I have one. I used it for first year hard. I pay my rent by mowing lawns for landlord - I mow 9 yards and a vacant lot. After a year of hot dusty mowing I went to change oil and noticed placard. Mower hasn't used a drop of oil and the original oil still looks like pure honey. Even smells like new oil. I'm impressed!


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Even if such a ranking does exist it would be of little practical use Consider the following: variations during manufacturing Due to things like different suppliers for the same part, different operators, different norms adopted in different factories/assembly locations... variations during operation Due to variations in temperature and humidity, the ...


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Water in a tire gives more pressure when inside tire temp is higher. This is more an advantage because this higher pressure gives lesser deflection so lesser heatproduction. The tire inside gascompound ( air of Nitrogen or whatever) can get incidentially boiling point of water at 1013mb( 14.6psi)by the heat of brakes tranfered trough the rimms. Pressure ...


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