12

This is a good recommendation The wood will compress a bit when you lower your car down onto it. The jack stand will dig into the wood as well. The benefits related to this related to the vehicle slipping on the jack stands. I've never had a piece of wood fail doing this, although soft white pine sometimes comes out looking pretty beat up. To answer ...


9

It is ABSOLUTELY safe. I do this all the time. Mind you I usually use a piece of 2x4, though. It spreads the load over more of the frame or body and keeps the jack stand from doing any damage. The jack stand does dig into the wood, which is much better than digging into your vehicle. The wood can crack. The wood can do a lot of things. But once the wood is ...


7

I'm going to take a different approach to this. As pictured, it's perfectly safe, and sometimes recommended to spread out the pressure to avoid damage. However, I've also seen a pile of wood used to extend a jack's height...and then fall over. Don't do that! (The car in question landed on the freshly-unpadded jack with the oil pan...messy.)


6

The problem is with unequal length arms (assuming a 4-link suspension as we were discussing in chat), the pinion angle is going to change as it travels through its arc of motion. You can see it in this graphic what I'm talking about. Due to this you are not going to be able to set it for every ride height. Since your application is not for racing, you want ...


3

Absolutely not restricted to any build. A 9" Ford rear-end is utilized in just about every kind of hotrod build out there, mainly due to its strength and longevity. You can find one made (built) for just about any application out there. You can even find them without any type of mounting on them where you can add your specific type of mounts for a specific ...


2

It’s probably safe - if you make sure the grain of the wood is aligned perpendicularly to any small pressure points - for example, the recommended jack points on most cars. Otherwise, it’s at risk of splitting, which would result in the car falling the height of the wood, and perhaps more. Some pieces of wood could have structural vulnerabilities - do this ...


2

I replaced the lift rods for the hatch and it fixed the problem. Took less then 10 minutes to change them out.


1

I am an engineer, and to cut to the chase: No way! It won't handle the forces, the geometry will be completely wrong, and the axle will not be located properly and constantly want to twist. Your better bet is to figure out a way to incorporate the damper inside of the of the existing spring, and using the lower spring perch already on the axle. Only that ...


1

As Moab states in the comments, a bad rear differential cannot hurt an automatic transmission. The only thing attaching them is a driveshaft. Other than that, they are completely independent assemblies. Even if you've already done irreparable damage to the rear end, you can most likely prolong its life by topping off the gear oil and fixing the seal. Even ...


1

Jaguar XJ independent rear suspension - not sure exactly what year though...


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