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17

What you've been sent is the radiator for the diesel variant - as opposed to what appears to be the 1.25l Zetec petrol engine in your first diagram. You're correct in that the "main" radiator connections are the same between the two (Despite the confusing placement of the lower hose on the second diagram it is the same hose and hooks up in the same place ...


6

Coolant coming out clean is a good sign. How to spot a bad radiator A radiator is a device consisting of tubes through which coolant flows and fins connecting the tubes. The fins increase the surface area of the radiator (dramatically), increasing cooling efficiency. The surface of the radiator should look uniform. If there is an area where the fins are ...


4

Run it for a bit so it mixes. Then go to a shop / garage and have the ratio tested. Once you have the result, then you can drain a bit and add water if necessary. If it is within the correct range then you are lucky. Warning do not open the cooling system when the engine is hot, always wait for it to cool down. However, it was better to add as you did, ...


3

Probably a couple reasons. For something to be mass manufactured and marked for human consumption, it needs to go through a certification process, needs to be stored in food-grade containers, etc. The deionized water didn't go through this process, and probably isn't in a food-grade container. Also, it may contain trace chemicals from the deionization ...


3

If you find that the fan works when the wiring to the themro-switch is bridged (i.e. when you physically plug the wiring, the fan turns on) this would suggest that the themo-switch is at fault. This is the bit that screws into the cooling system and plugs into the fan loom where you manually switch it on. Testing the resistance of this switch at different ...


2

The real problem here is what you already stated: that you drove home for 60 miles with little or no coolant in the engine because of a damaged radiator. The temperature gauge was unreliable in this case because it is designed to read coolant temperature. If there isn't any it will never show the actual overheating that the engine did. In my opinion you are ...


2

I am chemical cleaning engr. Pls. do not use vinegar to your car radiator because it is normally made of aluminum it will severely attack the material. With Citric acid is not also advisable but then possible to use under the condition that you know what to do, like the temperature during the cleaning and time of exposure, do not expose to more than an hour ...


2

One of the hoses could have a small pin hole and be causing the loss over time - as the coolant only escapes when fully hot and under pressure then the coolant evaporates and leaves no trace. The coolant can spray out into the engine compartment and not condense on any component or leave any trace around the hole... I found one by driving it hard when up to ...


2

What @blacksmith37 says is true, kinda. You could stick the hose into a catch bottle, and that would tell you that coolant is coming out during high load, high temp conditions. That's it. The coolant in that bottle WILL not go back into the radiator during cool down, like in a more modern cooling system. What makes that work in a modern flow back overflow ...


2

The reason the cooling fan comes on when you turn on the A/C is because in front of your radiator there is another part that looks just like a radiator called a condenser. The condenser works the same way that the radiator does in that it radiates heat to the atmosphere, and it does this more efficiently when air is moving faster through it. The scientific ...


1

It's best to minimize the amount of air below the cap, so topping it off up to the ring that the cap seals against is best BUT if you've just replaced the coolant, there's likely to be air elsewhere in the system anyway. Some vehicles have a defined bleeding process you have to follow to get the air trapped in high points out (usually the cylinder head and ...


1

Probably. Sulfamic acid is the material of choice to clean industrial tube heat exchangers. These units are steel and brass. I can't say if it is good with aluminum as aluminum is almost never used in refinery heat exchangers. I doubt your radiator is steel, I have never seen a steel auto radiator. Today they are generally aluminum . Older ones were copper ...


1

Possibly a blown head gasket. Did the car overheat when you started losing the ability too go over 20? If so the engine may have overheated too much and blown a head gasket (why it wont start). Any other details on the no start would be helpful.


1

The 1259 code usually comes on because of a switch failure on the vtc solenoid assembly. You can check the screen in the gasket for blockage. Oil control valve failure on these is not as common and sets a different code IIRC. The inline trans filter wouldn’t set the code. Check the connectors for water. If they look fine. Use a scantool and do a test drive,...


1

Have the codes read. (If you're in the US, many auto parts stores like AutoZone will do this for free. Do not pay a dealer diagnostic fee.) Even if the light is off, the ECU will store the codes from the last time the light came on. Alternatively, you can get a cheap bluetooth or wifi OBD-2 module for about $20 and scan it yourself with your smartphone. ...


1

In my 1.6 mazda 3 I did it using water and the results were pretty good, I did it at around 45k KM as a preventative maintenance. Before that a couple of years back when I took my other 2.0 Mazda 3 to local dealer he used something like “Purple Cleaner”, honestly I did not see much difference, the later one costed my few hundred extra with almost same result....


1

There's a thermocouple switch which activates the fan when the coolant in the radiator gets above a certain temperature. It's probably the switch, which is cheap - a new switch is probably all of £10 including delivery. Installing is relatively simple job, but IIRC the sensor on Corsas is typically at the bottom of the radiator, so you would have to get ...


1

I've seen this exact behaviour on Volkswagens with overfilled coolant systems. It's typical of a car with an air-lock and when the coolant comes above the max level, it covers the overflow pipe which vents into the coolant tank (the little ball shaped tank). This prevents the flow of water up from the system when it's trying to vent air from the radiator. ...


1

Modern aluminium rads will have rust buildup that plug the rad upp, vinegar doesn't work, what you need to do is buy something like Tremans X-rost and take the radiator out plug the holes and fill it up with X-rost, let it be there for 48 hours and then clean it with water, will be like new inside.


1

Under the radiator cap should be full - no air. Fill up the radiator and make sure your overflow bottle is filled to the full mark. Check it frequently and look for leaks until you can be sure it is not leaking. It may take a couple heat cycles to get it full, as there are places coolant goes when the engine is hot that you cannot fill (or at least have a ...


1

There is no such thing as an overflow tank with a pressure cap, if it has a pressure cap, its called an expansion tank. There are 3 different types of tanks. An expansion tank is plumbed in and always receives the same pressure as the radiator. A recovery tank works on the hot/cold pushing fluid back and forth principle through a radiator cap with 2 seals....


1

Many testers are of such low quality that they can't be trusted. Also, temperature plays a part, and the solution should be at 60 deg. F. to have accurate results. If you are using the non-toxic Propylene glycol type, a tester for the regular ethylene glycol can't be used. A refractometer is the only really accurate way to test it, but the good ones are ...


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