8

If you didn't overheat the car, then you've done no damage. The radiator cap seals the system and allows pressure to build (to a point), which raises the boiling point of the coolant. This allows it to take more heat. If you didn't overheat your vehicle, there's nothing to worry about. The only thing you'd need to do is ensure you haven't lost any coolant in ...


7

"Green" coolant is usually considered a typical coolant. It should get changed out about every two years. "Orange" coolant implies Dexcool, which is the stuff used in GM vehicles and is a long life coolant. It should be replaced about every five years or 150k miles. If you mix the two together, there's no real issue, but you shorten the life of the coolant ...


5

Depends on the design. If those ports are connected to the same fluid channels in the radiator then you will need to blank them or connect together. Many have a separate radiator built into the same structure and the auto box cooling portion is designed to have oil flowing through it. This means you can just leave it or blank as you wish. I used that ...


3

Early on when coolants changed to different types you could not mix types, they would gel. These days all coolants can intermix without issue as coolant manufacturers made coolants compatible with any other type of coolant, so you are safe with mixing these days. But as Paul stated doing a cooling system flush is part of regular maintenance as coolant ...


3

Yellowjackets are omnivorous, meaning part of their diet consists of other bugs. One thing radiators are full of are dead insects which are easy to forage. This also explains why heat doesn’t play into their activity. Your best defense is a good wash.


2

Three possibilities come to my mind: As noted in the first comment above, your hose clamp is failing or loose. Check it. The hose is damaged or leaking. Replace it. The radiator fitting is damaged or leaking. This may require replacing the radiator. Also, I'll add, based on later information that you posted. Perhaps this is not the root problem. If ...


2

So if I understand correctly, one of your radiator hoses (I'm assuming the UPPER one here since if it was the lower one, they never would have been able to fill it with coolant to begin with) was disconnected or (more likely) became disconnected at some point while you were driving. If that's the case and your engine overheated to the point of stopping, as ...


2

So I'm guessing at one time your vehicle had a slight coolant leak. The owner added some coolant stop leak to the system. There are lots of forms of this... here's a typical summary. I know lots of folks have recipes for leak stop stuff.. the one I remember from old skool mechanics is to use raw ground pepper as a leak stop filler. Generally stop leak ...


2

Here's how you test for looming problems: Harmonic balancer. Like any other engine internals, it will rap, knock, or tick long before it fails. Rev the engine steady in neutral at 2,000, 3,000 rpm and listen carefully for noises; listen also when you release the pedal. Check for noises at cold startup and at other temperatures besides fully warmed up. ...


1

From your description, you have a coolant leak. One of the quickest way to ruin an engine is to have insufficient coolant. If your radiator had no coolant (water), running it could do damage. The leak could be coming from any number of places, as it can travel a good distance from the source by the time it hits the ground. Someone needs to have eyes on it to ...


1

Hose design has improved greatly in the last 20 years. Because of the use of better materials it is difficult to judge the condition of the hose based on appearance. Even with the old hoses you often had to remove one end and see what the inside looked like. I think any answer will be anecdotal based on individual experiences. My last two vehicles were 18 ...


1

All belt or chain in many cars is stated in your manual book or service manual for that car, every car have different manufacture safety standard. For common vehicles this is around 60K miles - 100K miles. (~100K-200K Kilometers) although is stated with 100K miles if you looking at your serpentine or fan or timing belt is a bit worn, tacky, stripped; it's ...


1

it sounds like the primary cooling fan isn't running. The A/C utilizes a secondary fan, which turns on when you turn your A/C on. The problem could be one of several things. The relay going to the primary fan could be bad. It should be the same exact relay as the secondary. If you swap them out, it might tell you if the relay is bad. You can also pull the ...


1

The plenum is usually an enlarged section feeding the 4, 5, 6, 8 or more ports so that there is less turbulence in the air as it enters the ports. Too much turbulence and funny things start to happen like one cylinder runs rich compared to the others.


1

I'll first say that it is not a question of your engine not overheating at all, but rather your engine not overheating yet. Empty coolant will absolutely cause your engine to overheat given the opportunity. You should not drive this vehicle more than is absolutely necessary because running an engine dry can cause a whole host of very expensive issues. Also, ...


1

Several possibilities but the one that comes to mind first, due to your spraying issue, is a coolant hose burst or a connection loose. Either way you want to deal with this promptly as you may cause severe damage to your expensive engine very quickly should the cooling flow to the vital parts get interrupted. Next up would be a problem with the water pump or ...


1

In my opinion, they seemed to be concerned about the antifreeze and replaced it. That was a good call. They were probably trying to clear the system. Many times on vehicles this age, multiple flushes are required to completely clear the system. They probably wanted to do more but didn't want you to go through the extra expense on a vehicle that age. If they ...


1

The typical 50:50 glycol mix under normal operating pressure can be over 200F. That would feel very hot. Typically 120 F is the hottest water a person can stand for more than several seconds. Get an infra-red thermometer , great for a wide range of temperatures without contact. Helpful for making fudge. I drove my 3.5 L Murano about 12 miles on interstate ...


1

Dexcool is a GM product, and it comes out orange. Ford came out with an orange coolant (Motorcraft Orange) which is similar to Dexcool, and probably interchangeable, but there's no consensus. It's hard to say which was used from the color. But, it wasn't right anyway. This chart shows which coolant to use for most Ford vehicles depending on the model year, ...


1

They can do a cooling system flush and it'll be fine. It takes a while for mixed coolant to do damage. You should be fine with a monday flush. Flushes run less tha $200.


1

If there's a crack in your radiator, you'd most likely see the steam coming from where the crack is at or if the crack is spraying coolant on hot engine parts. This, considering the situation, would be completely expected. As you stated, though, as long as you've kept the coolant topped off and you've never seen the temp rise above 1/2 way (normal), there ...


1

That’s not for coolant That is for Automatic Transmission Fluid. Inside your radiator is another little tiny radiator that interchanges heat between the ATF and the coolant. This flows both ways: if the ATF is hotter than the coolant, e.g. Lots of heavy torque converter work, it keeps it at sane temperature. If the ATF is cooler than the coolant, it ...


1

I would upgrade the radiator to an aluminum model if they offer one, if not a new brass radiator as the cores may be blocked in the old one and its not worth sending to a radiator shop to rod them out. The fan switch in the radiator are prone to fail or work intermittently, replace it also.


1

Sounds like you have replaced most items suspect of the cause of overheating at high speed. The return hose from rad to water pump may be collapsing when water pump reaches high speeds. This will cause restricted flow of coolant hence less volume therefore overheat of block fluids. If you have been around vehicles as long as I have you may have removed "...


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