Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
24

The seller should not be selling the vehicle with oil in the cooling system. That supposed "quick fix" should have been rectified at the earliest opportunity. Have him flush the cooling system and put another few tens of kilometers on the odometer before you even consider such a vehicle. If the seller is topping off the radiator with oil instead of water, ...


22

I would be more concerned about whether engine oil is actually finding its way into the radiator from the engine. If it is, this would be indicative of a compromised head gasket, warped cylinder head, or damaged oil cooler (if the car uses radiator coolant for cooling the oil). The first two items are not trivial to replace or fix. The third one isn't far ...


17

What you've been sent is the radiator for the diesel variant - as opposed to what appears to be the 1.25l Zetec petrol engine in your first diagram. You're correct in that the "main" radiator connections are the same between the two (Despite the confusing placement of the lower hose on the second diagram it is the same hose and hooks up in the same place ...


16

It can absolutely be started without a radiator. You will not cause any damage as long as the engine does not overheat. If you don't run it long enough for the engine to get too hot, it's not an issue. To give you an example of how it could be beneficial: I used to own a 94 Camaro Z28. The engine in it was a Gen-II LT1 350. This engine has what's called an ...


14

Normally, I would ask first in a comment but that seems to be a privilege not available to new users, so here goes: Are you sure it was the radiator cap and not the overflow bottle? The radiator is usually full and getting 100ml in would be a struggle, not to mention that the green coolant would be staring you in the face. If you radiator wasn't full then ...


13

I would definitely not intentionally put sodium hypchlorite bleach in my radiator. Vinegar is one thing, but the sodium hypochlorite will attack anything aluminum in your radiator, intake manifold, block, or head. It'll also attack (vigorously) any rubberized gaskets that're in contact with coolant. Even disregarding outright measurable damage, it'll release ...


13

I think the main reason for this is convenience. It's an easy place to run the water pump. If you ran it out to a fan belt, it would be in the way of the timing belt while doing it, or it would be a really awkward mess trying to work around it. The second reason is for compactness. With the water pump stuck out of the way, it physically makes the engine ...


13

Yes, it's possible some of the seals designed to withstand water and glycol could get damaged I am thinking you are creating a fictitious scenario here, so I'll roll with it. If you filled your radiator with oil and started your car and let it run for awhile I would be most concerned with damage to seals that were designed to withstand water and glycol. ...


11

Straight coolant does not have the cooling properties of water. Straight water causes corrosion, freezes at too high of a temperature, and boils at too low of a temperature. The range to shoot for is between 50/50 to 70/30 Coolant/water


11

An engine is a very large thermal mass. When the engine is cold it takes time to warm up. If you only run the engine for 15 to 30 seconds from cold there should be no problem. Running the engine any longer than that may cause the engine to overheat.


10

Engine safety. If you lose an accessory belt driven water pump, you're likely to keep driving, thinking the "oh, I just don't have an alternator" while you're busy cooking your engine beyond repair (normally with no temperature notification/change, if anything it'll read cold). When the water pump is on with the timing belt (or geared to crankshaft as is ...


9

I agree with Timo - if it is a big enough leak that you can see it clearly, then getting the car transported is much safer. In general, using water as coolant is OK for a short time or as a "get you home" alternative, but it does not have the anti-freeze and corrosion inhibiting properties of a proper coolant mix, so should not be left in the engine for ...


9

First thing I'd try to figure out is how quickly it leaks - run it, stick your head underneath it as check if there is any visible leaking. If there is, chances are that it's not going to make it for 30 miles. I'd also check for any evidence of oil and water mixing. If there is, don't drive it. If it's not leaking that badly I'd be tempted to top it up with ...


8

I would not use that solution to clean my radiator. Remember that a radiator itself is primarily made of fairly thin aluminum. The bleach/vinegar could very easily damage the structure and weaken it. A washing machine is made of (in most cases) a steel drum coated with porcelain, or stainless steel, both of which are very sturdy and are made to last a long ...


8

They may not have bled your cooling system properly As a possibility, if you had air trapped in your cooling system it would expand as the engine approached operating temperature. It would eventually, hopefully, make it's way into your radiator where the air would get released into the overflow tank by a valve that opens with higher pressures. As the ...


8

I use a garden weed sprayer, its less powerful than a high pressure washer yet can have its jet aimed in a small area. Additionally you can fill it with hot water which will help loosen the mud. Something like this Try a few applications of something like Muc-off too. Normally its best to try to remove the gunk as soon as you get home rather than wait ...


7

I appears to be coming from the front and the center of the engine. I could be a hose near the water pump. The water pump itself may have failed. Most water pumps have a weep hole that drips when the seals fail. It is on the bottom of the pimp and difficult to see. You may be able to feel it by reaching under the pump, it is a small hole about half the ...


7

Yes, it's possible. Also, the bit you lost that you think may be a leaking pipe is actually being turned to steam and blown out your exhaust. The car runs fine until the engine gets hot enough for the thermostat to open up, at which point exhaust gases are let into the radiator. The details of how/why is a bit long, but this is what happens. How do I know ...


7

If you can see and access the crack, a two-part epoxy or something like JB-Weld can be great for a temporary fix. This page shows the process on a metal radiator for a race car, but your fix would be similar. Clean the site of the repair, and rough up the surface with fine sand paper, especially if working on plastic. Mix the two-part epoxy and generously ...


7

It's possible that the impeller blades on the water pump are either compromised or gone completely. I ran into a somewhat similar situation with a Chrysler. The engine would not overheat driving. Idling it would overheat eventually but it took a long tome to do so. The heater core would not get hot no matter what I did. The thermostat was already replaced. ...


7

Yes, you need to cut them - difficult but possible with sidecutters, they do make special cutters for these, but you can grind them : be very careful where the sparks go : cover everything... For replacement use a good quality hoseclamp making sure it is sufficiently wide.


6

The main thing the higher pressure cap will do is to increase the boiling point of the coolant slightly. 3psi isn't going to make a huge difference, but it will make some difference. If your cooling system is in good shape, the higher pressure unlikely to cause problems. If your cooling system is already on the way out, well, then it'll be on the way out a ...


6

You need to drain the coolant and replace it. You should follow the instructions in your owners manual. If you don't have one handy, the ehow page is a fairly general set of instructions but it'll get you into the right general location for the coolant drain. Keep in mind, engine coolant is toxic and should be disposed of properly. This is a perfectly ...


6

Here's a thread from honda-tech.com. Sounds like you should have one from the factory, but it's possible an aftermarket thermostat housing was installed minus the valve. If you really have no bleeder, you could install a thermostat housing that has one, or pull yours and install one yourself. Otherwise, you're on the right track, though you might try ...


6

Yes, it will. However, your biggest concern is going to be getting enough air flowing over it. Do yourself a favour and go look at the engine bay of a 200x model Subary Impreza WRX. The intercooler is mounted flat on the top of the engine and the characteristic scoop forces air onto it to cool the intake air. The same type of thing might work for your ...


6

I think this points at the thermostat being bad. The reason I go in this direction is due to there being no heat coming from the heater vents. I'm not sure if Subaru has it this way, but many heating systems in cars only divert coolant from exterior of the motor to the heater core. If the thermostat is not allowing (much or) any coolant through, you'll only ...


6

Putty/epoxy works but here's a handy tip I picked up from my materials professor to ensure that the crack doesn't propagate: Drill small holes at the ends of the crack to arrest its growth before using metal putty/epoxy to seal the existing crack. My dad used to own a Maxima that developed a crack in the radiator's aluminum head. The mechanic he took it ...


6

Once your system expels as much fluid as it can via the pump there is still an additional amount of fluid that is left in the block and other areas that the pump can't push out because there isn't enough fluid and pump is just attempting to push air through the system. Some engines have block drain plugs. You would need to remove those, allow to drain and ...


6

Radiators are pretty simple to replace. If you've never done it before, look at some youtube videos, and set aside about 4 hours for it (90 minutes, if you're handy with a spanner). Repairs on radiators are rarely successful - it's often a plastic sidewall that goes on Subarus. Sticking various concoctions in the radiator (or a raw egg) just causes extra - ...


6

You want to make sure you do not put tap water into the cooling system on your vehicle. The cooling system has a leak, which is why you need to refill it periodically. Look on the ground where you park and note any wet spots. Check all the hoses to and from your radiator for any signs of a leak such as wet fluid or runny looking patches of evaporated fluid ...


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